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I am just getting into trap and sporting clays. I have a few guns i'm looking to trade and came along a browning citori field grade 28" in 96% condition. It is from the 90's and would be traded for a gun which would be right at $1,000.

This offer just came up and i was just curious if this would be a worth while gun for me to start off with or if i should be in search of something other than a field grade or a 28" barrel.

Thanks for any guidance you have.
Dan
 

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Browning offers various options on their "Clays" guns vs their "Field" guns, mechanically, their both the same. One will shoot just as well as the other for both. Citori Shotguns have proven themselves as a solid, reliable shotgun over the past decade. If the owner has taken care of the gun, it will be a solid shooter for years to come.

One of the reasons I purchased a Field Cynergy was because I didn't want porting on my barrels, one option Browning didn't offer on their Sporting Guns. I don't hunt, only use the gun for clays/skeet/5 stand and it has held up great!

If you feel the deal is a good one, by all means make the trade!
 

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The Citori is a great gun, but if you intend to get serious about trap, the 28" bbls and field stock will not be suitable. Trap targets are risers and going away. You'll need a gun that shoots high, something not easily accomplished with a field stock. Right now, you're probably covering the bird. Eventually you'll need to see the bird in its entire flight. The 28" bbls are also a little short, considering the longer sighting plane that trap shooters prefer. Barrels are usually anywhere from 30", out to 34".

There are shooters out there who can use field-type stocks, but the best trapshooters use a single-shot (O/U for doubles), with a high comb (monte carlo, adjustable, etc.). Be sure to try out a dedicated trap gun, and you'll see the difference.

The Citori will last a couple of lifetimes, if properly cared for, and you'll get your money's worth when you use it.

A well-stocked gun shop may well have a Remington 870 or Winchester Model 12 trap gun. More targets have been broken with them, than all others combined. They can be had for as little as $300, and it's a great way to start with an inexpensive trap gun.

Best of luck, and welcome!

Best,
Dennis
 

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pendennis said:
The 28" bbls are also a little short, considering the longer sighting plane that trap shooters prefer. Barrels are usually anywhere from 30", out to 34".
Was waiting for someone to bring up "Sighting Plane", didn't realize it would be so soon...

I would pay an individual if they could prove to me that you could see the 4 to 6 inch difference when looking down a shotgun barrel. If you can, its obvious the gun doesn't fit you in the first place..the real reason behind your inability to hit anything!

It's an old wive's tale and a excuse used by many a poor shooter.

pendennis said:
but if you intend to get serious about trap, the 28" bbls and field stock will not be suitable. Trap targets are risers and going away. You'll need a gun that shoots high, something not easily accomplished with a field stock. "
Stocks are different also., check these measurements..

Browning Sporting Clays model:

http://www.browning.com/products/catalo ... ype_id=231

Browning Field Model:

http://www.browning.com/products/catalo ... ype_id=230

Both look like 1 11/16 drop at Comb and 2 5/16 drop at Heel...but I may be wrong, please verify!

Trap stocks are different, I will admit, they do tend to be a little higher, but nothing you couldn't get used to.
 

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Bob, I've run 25's with barrels as short as 26". I've shot numerous trap rounds with a Remington 3200 skeet gun. My prefence for the longer barrels does relate to the "sight plane", and there is a huge difference in 28" and 34" barrels. I do not like to cover the bird with the muzzle, and that is what happens with field/trap guns. The longer barrels also help me in preventing over-swing.

Dennis
 

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I agree with Dennis on longer barrels for trap. Clay and skeet shooters are now buying 32 inch barrels for those disiplines. I know of one clay shooter that had custom 34" K-80 O/U barrels made for the game. Makes me wonder what he paid for them. Guess if you have to ask....you couldn't afford them.

The industry designs guns for intended use. In trap shooting, 30 inch barrels are the shortest offering combined with a short single barrel or O/U frame. To me, its more about balance and handling dynamics than sight plain. Its a certain bet trapshooters could break some targets with a short barrel, but if they expect to break a lot of targets, the longer barrels will help with the task.

Last summer I purchased both 30" and 32" O/U barrels to compare in trap doubles. Have always used 32's in the past and do find a handling difference with the 2 inch shorter version. I plan to give the 30 inchers a 1000 pair before I make a firm decision and sell the other set of barrels.

Maltzie
 

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If you want a gun for several disciplines, there is always the Beretta A391 Teknys Gold Target. It comes with a 30" bbl, two ribs (70/30 and 50/50, with 80/20 and 60/40 also available), adjustable comb, and 3 fore-end weights. It's priced at under $2k, and several premium chokes. It's reliable, and would work well for clays, five-stand, and perhaps even skeet.

Of course, as with multi-disciplined guns, it's a compromise.

Best,
Dennis
 

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Dan,

The Citori you are thinking about is a great gun, as the others have stated. BUT if you buy it for Trap shooting you will soon be wondering if you should have gotten one with a longer barrel and different design stock and within a year you are going to want to replace it.

I own two Citori's, one dedicated Trap model with 32" barrels one Sporting Clays model with 30" barrels which I use for other clay games and I love them both. For the money you can't beat a Citori.

Come on pendennis, the guy is asking about a Citori :) and while I enjoy semi-auto shotguns (Remingtons) they are a bit of a hassle with the shell catchers needed for trap. I gave up on using them a few years back. I think they are great for other Clay sports however.

Happy shooting..................................Levi
 

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pendennis said:
If you want a gun for several disciplines, there is always the Beretta A391 Teknys Gold Target. It comes with a 30" bbl, two ribs (70/30 and 50/50, with 80/20 and 60/40 also available), adjustable comb, and 3 fore-end weights. It's priced at under $2k, and several premium chokes. It's reliable, and would work well for clays, five-stand, and perhaps even skeet.

Of course, as with multi-disciplined guns, it's a compromise.

Best,
Dennis
I have to agree with you. I have a Beretta Teknys Gold Target and it is a great sporting clays gun. Then you can make it in to Trap gun and it will work for that also.
But for me I like my XT or BT-99 for Trap and my Cynergy 32" sporting for sporting clays.
 

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Levi, my point was to show Danv1317 that the Citori, while a good buy, and good for several clays disciplines, would not be ideal for trap. For a few bucks more, he can get the Beretta Gold Teknys. I owned a Teknys, but traded it in on a Perazzi MT-6, since I wanted a true, dedicated trap gun.

Yes, the ejection of empties is a hassle, but every gun which is multi-purpose, is a compromise somewhere along the line. The Citori is not a trap gun, and never will be.

Some years back I used a Remington 1100 for skeet. I spent a lot of time picking up empties, but it was sure cheaper than what a Remington 3200 would have cost, and I put all my savings into shooting skeet targets.

Best,
Dennis
 

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Dennis, I hope you didn't take my comments too seriously. sometimes my humor doesn't come thru :) but I might point out that in years gone by ,on this forum, you might have been accused of "topic stealing" by switching direction of a specific question. I hope that this is no longer the case.

Dan my comments above are from the experience of being in you position many years ago. I went thru so many shotguns trying to find the perfect "all-around shotgun" that I was almost asked to become an FFL dealer.:lol:

When the question of "economics" comes up, my experience was, by the time I added up all I spent on "inexpensive guns" I would have been ahead to have bought a gun dedicated to each Clay Sport I wanted to shoot, the exception being that my 30" Sporting Clays Model Citori also works just as well at Skeet with simple choke changes.

Again the Citori you are looking at is a good deal, money wise but like Dennis and others have said "it is not a trap gun". Good luck,

Happy shooting..........................Levi
 
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