Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the pros and cons of a parallel comb stock for skeet shooting? I notice that almost all trap guns come equipped this way but seldome do I see a skeet specific shotgun (or sporting clays for that matter) that comes from the factory with a parallel comb stock.

TIA - Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,533 Posts
Pros: Regardless where you place your cheek along the stock, it is the same height below the line of the rib. Also, when the gun recoils, it is less likely to hit your cheek (or so they say).

Cons: Uh, let's see.............. hmmm, I'm sure there must be some cons but I can't think of any. Oh yeah, I remember. :lol: Some people just like the sloping comb better. :D On some shots, such as at Station 8, you need to have your cheek a little farther back on the stock in order to shoot at such a high angle. A sloping comb makes it easier to lower your cheek on the comb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
I am a big believer in parallel comb stocks for women (men too), because so many women require a 13.5 in LOP.

A Remington gun is a good example. The pitch on this gun is fairly steep, and when you get a youth model on this gun, the LOP is only 13.5, with a fairly steep pitch, and I think there is significant cheek slap. Generally speaking, the farther away from the receiver you place the cheek, the less cheek slap.

Because of sloping shoulder and longer necks, many women need a 3 inch drop. However, with a short LOP of 13.5, such a gun would be brutal.

If you will notice, many companies are making women's stocks with less than 2.5 drop to heel, but, for the most part, these require that women crink their neck over the stock.

I think the perfect answer is the Wenig New American Women's stock with a 3 inch drop and a parallel comb. Fabulous idea.
 
G

·
:D List me as a great believer in parallel combs for skeet. The reasons are given in an earlier post. I presently ha ve two guns with parallel combs and will convert all my guns used for target shooting in the future. As far as I can tell there is no down side to the parallel comb.

Stan
 
G

·
Parallel combs are growing in popularity in all disciplines. They have several advantages and few "disadvantages."

Advantages include the individuality of drops at the comb and drops at the heel. Either dimension can be had independent of the other. There is no higher part of the comb to mash into the face of the shooter. The cheek can be placed anywhere on the comb without altering the vertical point of impact.

The disadvantages are only two: varitation of the drop at the comb dimension to correctly fit different facial configurations by changing the cheek placement on the comb, is not available on a parallel comb stock. Some shooters, experienced with rising comb guns, find parallel comb guns less natural in feel and in the perceived security of the gun mount. This is especially true in games beginning with a low gun.

Shoot Well,
Rollin
http://stockfitting.virtualave.net/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Nice to see you posting over here on this forum...I have always enjoyed your gun fitting posts.

I have alwasy shot a Beretta Target with a parallel comb. However, the Target has about a 2 mm drop to heel. Not much drop, but if you put a longer butt pad on the gun (a Beretta option), you will lower point-of-impact.

Recently, I purchased a Beretta 20 *****, 390, with more of a field stock dimension with about a 2.5 inch drop to heel. I came to understand what the term "crawiling into the stock" means, and I think a person has to get used to sensing the correct cheek position with such a stock.

I am thinking about getting a New American stock from Wenig for my 20 *****.

Rollin, do you know anybody else who makes these New American styles as does Wenig?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Does it make a difference if you are shooting "low gun" whether you have a parallel comb or sloping comb?

I have a Citori XS Skeet with a parallel comb, but have only been shooting "high gun" skeet. I was wondering if there is any advantage/disadvantage between the two types of combs when it comes to mounting the gun from a low position.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
I shoot low-gun also, and have found the parallel comb an advantage because the gun (for me) seems to come right up to the face so there is no searching for proper stock placement....what I call creeping into the stock.

For me, if I bring the gun to the face, it is always just exactly at the right spot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,618 Posts
Wenig's New American is one that they designed to give a parallel comb and a bit of cast at the heel to the stock. It is well designed but it is a heavy piece of lumber. I know of no one else that makes them (other than custom stocks) but there are very few if any, other companies offering semi-inleted stocks since Bishop and Fagen went out of business. Maybe someone else can provide alternatives.

Some shooters starting with a low gun feel that with a rising comb, the gun can be mounted more quickly with the rising comb coming back into the cheek without the risk of the comb's sliding and catching on the cheek during the mount.

In my opinion, it is of little matter; whichever one feels best and is easier to mount is fine.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top