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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to identify a Parker Brothers shotgun that I have come across. It is a 12 gauge twisted steel double barrel with external hammers and double triggers.

It says "Manors" and "Plain Twist" on the rib. It has a 4 digit serial number. It has patent dates of 1866 and 1875.

On the www.parkergun.org site it shows all hammerless guns on it's identification page.

Can someone help me with the identification of the model, etc.? I am not familiar with the "water table" of a shotgun, where would that be and what am I looking for?

Thanks,

Chubber
 

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On a Parker that old , your best bet would be to contact one of the Parker Collector's Associations around, chances are it is far too valuable for an internet Appraisal by anyone but a stone cold expert specializing in Parkers. That being said, condition plays a BIG part of it.

We can however, probably determine the frame and grade...

Frame size on Parker shotguns is determined by the number on the bottom of the rear barrel lug on breech. Frame sizes (from largest to smallest) include 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1½, 1, ½, 0, 00, and 000. 8 ga. guns typically are framed 6 or 7. 10 ga. guns typically are 3 or 4. 12 ga. guns typically range from 2 through 1 (more desirable). "½" frame 12 ga. guns are very rare and desirable. 20 and 16 ga.s range from 2 through 0 (more desirable). 28 ga. guns are either 0 or 00 (more desirable and twice as expensive). .410 bore shotguns are 00 or 000 (most common and most desirable). 8 and 10 ga. steel barreled shotguns are very rare, and prices can equate .410 bore values if the original condition is there.

The grade on Parker shotguns is a number or initials located on the water table (flats the barrels rest upon when closed) of the frame. An alphabetical designation would indicate the grade immediately. For numerals, a "2" would indicate a GH, while an "8" would specify an A-1 Special - interpolate for the others (numbers 3 through 7).
 
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To access the water table, pull the little latch on the foregrip. this should come off in your hand. Then push the lever that actuates the barrel break hinge and break the action downward. The barrels should swing down and lift out of the gun. The water table is, as Mars said, those flat parts in front of the firing pins where the barrel butts fit against the stock. You will see a letter and some numbers. That letter is your "grade". Since it says plain twist instead of Damascus twist, it will be somewhat below D grade (if the barrels are original). Parkergun.org has been most helpful to me with my 1902 D grade. Give them a shout. You can also order a very interesting letter that describes your guns ordering info for about 30 dollars from them. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the tip. I was able to noodle it through. On mine, it is not really a latch, but a square "pin" that is driven through from one side. That releases the forepiece that lets the rest of it break open.

There is no letter code on the water table except for a "T" inside crescents, one above and one below. There is also the barrel weight number. I don't have it in front of me right now, but I think that I remember seeing a "dot 2" where the dot is like a little circle, like a degree mark, before the number. The gun is very plain with no engraving on the wood or the metal. Prob. the lowest grade. The barrel is definately a twist, not Damascus, as the twists are obvious.

I have not seen any pictures of Parkers with external hammers. When did they go to the internal hammer?

Maybe I will send in for the Parker letter and see if they can shed some light on it.

Chubber
 
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