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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a handed down Remington Model 1100 12 gauge....i've got the option of either a full choke barrel or an improved cylinder barrell. I tend to miss alot of pheasants so I was thinking of going with the improved cylinder, but will that be enough to put down a pheasant? Thanks for your help
 

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Definitely go with the improved cylinder, unless maybe late season when the birds are flushing wild. Most factory loads, especially the nickle or copper plated loads, pattern pretty tight. Most people over-choke their guns, and with a full choke you'll either mangle them at close range or miss them entirely, or cripple them. I remember using a full choked pump for pheasants when I was a kid, and the ones I didn't hit, I'd miss and hit their tails (shoot for their head) or break a wing and lose them.

Good Hunting,
Mark
 

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I shoot a double barrel 20 gauge for the first month of pheasant season with a full on one side and a improved on the other. Shooting over pointers this is not a problem. I would say you should practice with each of the chokes and find your comfort zone with both. The improved will do a fine job bringing down a pheasant, but nothing better then cleaning a ring neck with no bb's in the breast. I try to stick to head shooting but we all know how that ends up. hehehe The full choke gives me a better chance at leaving a clean breast and if your not hunting over pointers the tighter pattern at greater distances will serve you better in the long run.

When I switch to my 12 I shoot a extended full choke. I still hunt over pointers but for some reason it gives me the confidence to take those 45 yard shots. I think it will be up to you to find out what you are comfortable with. Each will do a good job on a pheasant. I would also suggest doing some patterning with the chokes and various loads. My favorite pheasant load is #5 in a 12 gauge. In the 20 I stick to #6 and #4.
 

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I base my shotgun choice, shot size and choke selection on the time of year and the type of day.

Early in the season when the birds hold tighter I'll use my Red Label 20 with an Improved in the bottom barrel and modified in the top. I use 71/2 field loads in both barrels.

If it's a warm day and the birds are flushing too far out I'll simply change to #6 turkey loads or I'll switch to my Model 12 with a modified choke and 6 shot.

Later in the season I use the Model 12.
 
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