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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, first time poster, looking for some opinions.

There comes a time when the Rem 870, however rugged and reliable, becomes a second option, a backup, if you will. The time has come (after less than a month it'll become my trunk gun); I am saving money for a premier shotgun, and being probably the only shotgun I will ever purchase again, I'm going all out and money won't be a factor.

The following are what I am looking for:

1) semi-auto (must)
2) suitable for hunting upland, waterfowl, and deer
3) holo sights (I am pretty set on Eotech); thus pre-drilled/tapped would be nice
4) easy to clean/maintain

The following are things that do not factor in my decision:

1) barrel length, as long as it's 24"-28"
2) colour/finish
3) gas or inertia, it's all good (less recoil is always welcome)
4) 3 1/2" would be nice, but not necessary
5) not much of a trap/skeet shooter

Like I said, this is my one and final shotgun, and I'm willing to drop some good coin into it, maybe top out at around $2000 (w/Eotech installed).

I initially looked at the Super Black Eagle 2 and I was leaning towards that one, but the Winchester SX3 has caught my eye, and it's substantially cheaper than the SBE2. Other options I've seen out there are the Extrema2, Urika 391, Browning Gold.

Anyone had experience with these guns? I would really appreciate the feedback. Thanks!
 

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Welcome to Shotgunworld!

Since you already have an 870 pump, why not set it up to be your 870 for deer and turkey and your other shotgun for upland/waterfowl?

You could buy a rifled barrel for the 870 and put a scope on it. Use the smooth barrel and extra full choke for turkey and rifled barrel for deer. I haven't seen many shotguns with a red dot or holosight.

Then, shop for the upland/waterfowl shotgun. Lots of good choices. Beretta AL391 Urika, Technys, Extrema, Browning Gold, Benelli SBE, M1, M2, Remington 11-87. Find the one that fits you best. The berettas come with shims to assist with fit. The 11-87 will likely be one of the heavier choices so, if you do more upland than waterfowl, the beretta may be a better choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmm, I never thought about it that way. Setting up the 870 could be efficient. I do have my heart set on the Eotech though. In some areas where I hunt, however, it is buckshot only (no slugs), just throwing that out there.

Waterfowl/upland about the same, so weight could be an issue.
 

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Beretta AL391 Urika is a great shotgun. A slug barrell could set you back some bucks though.

Bet you can't just own one ( speaking of owning only one shotgun for life) :D There is always just one more that we need :roll:
 

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There are quite a few models that will fit for your intended uses. Theses are all well made and reliable semi auto's for all around use that range from waterfowl to upland to clays.

$800.00 and up: Benelli M2/M1 is Inertia operated. They are light in weight and very easy to clean. The have an automatic magazine cutoff and shims to adjust the stock. It has a good safety shape, size, and location. It holds four shells total and more if you add an extension. Most 3" field Inertia models are not usually the best choice for light target loads. Benelli Cordoba is also Inertia operated. They are similar to the M1/M2 with a few differences. They are thinner thru the forearm and hold five shells total. They do not accept a magazine extension to hold more. They have a two piece receiver which can make cleaning slightly easier. They are better for cycling lighter loads than the M1/M2. They only come in B/S and camo finishes. Their barrels are also ported which ay not be too good for blinds and boats with blinds.
Beretta AL391 is gas operated. They are fairly light and have very thin forearms. They have an automatic magazine cutoff, bolt lock back lever, and shims for the stock. It holds four shells total and cannot accept an extension. This design is more complicated to clean than most.
Browning Gold is gas operated. They are fairly light and pretty easy to clean. They have the speed load feature, stock shims, and a magazine cutoff switch. It has a good safety shape, size, and location. It holds five shells and more with an extension. The forearm/receiver junction could be much better than it is. The Evolve, Fusion, and SL models are similar to the standard Gold but are very light in weight and balance with more weight towards the stock. The Golds have a $100.00 rebate from Browning making them an excellent value.

$500.00-$800.00: Beretta 390 (Wal Mart) and 3901 are gas operated. They are basically the same gun with different shaped receivers (390 angled/3901 rounded). They are fairly light in weight, have stock shims, and automatic magazine cutoffs. They each hold four shells and can't accept extensions. They are not too bad to clean. The 390 (Wal Mart) only comes in B/S with a 28" barrel in 12 gauge.
Beretta Pintail/ES100 is inertia operated. It's fairly light and has a slim forearm. They are very easy to clean and have an automatic magazine cutoff. It holds five shells and can't be extended. Shims are available for this model. This model does not have a magazine release making the unloading take a tad longer than most.
Browning Silver Hunter is gas operated. It's very light in weight and has stock shims available for it. It only comes in a Silver/Blue/Wood finish. It holds five rounds total. It does not have the speed load and magazine cutoff features. It can be tricked into having a magazine cutoff by holding up the carrier and pulling back on the bolt. They have the same gas system as the more expensive Gold's.
Franchi 612 and 712 are gas operated. They are the same except for the receiver shape. They are very easy to clean and light in weight. They have an automatic magazine cutoff's and shims for the stock. They hold five shells and more with an extension. They don't have the best triggers in terms of weight and creep.
Franchi I-12 is inertia operated. Weight wise they are about average and balance with more weight towards the stock. It is one of the easiest semi autos to take down for a through cleaning. They hold five rounds and can take an extension. They have shims for the stock, automatic magazine cutoff, and a cartridge release lever. They do have a very modern look and are not the best choice for light target loads.
Weatherby SAS is gas operated. It is fairly light in weight and very easy to clean. It has a magazine cutoff switch and shims for the stock. It has a good safety shape, size, and location. It holds five shells and more with an extension. This model was made by SKB first then Valtro for Weatherby. Parts do not interchange between the two.
Winchester SX2 is gas operated. It has decent weight and is pretty easy to clean. It has a high rib design. It holds five rounds and more if extended. This is the only model that does not have a magazine cutoff of any kind but, can be tricked into having a magazine cutoff by holding up the carrier and pulling back on the bolt. The Light field model is the same but quite a bit lighter and balances with more weight towards the stock.
Winchester SX3 is the same as the SX2 with a much lighter weight and a more modern look.

You could go one more step and get two semi auto models. You could get and upland model and a waterfowl model instead of an all around model.

An upland model would be a lighter model like a Franchi AL 48 or Benelli Montefeltro.

A waterfowl model like the Benelli SBE's, Beretta Xtrema's, Browning Gold 3 1/2", Silver 3 1/2", Franchi 912 (also Dick's Diamond 912), Winchester SX2 3 1/2", SX3 3 1/2".

With some of these upland and waterfowl models you could get them new right of the rack and still be within your budget. With some combinations you would need to pick up a used one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Worc, thanks for that very detailed reply! I didn't realize there are so many options out there for semi-autos.

For these shotguns, do I have to drill/tap the receiver to mount the holo sights? Or are some pre-drilled/tapped?
 

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Worc, thanks for that very detailed reply! I didn't realize there are so many options out there for semi-autos.
Sure thing. There are far more models out there than I listed.

For these shotguns, do I have to drill/tap the receiver to mount the holo sights? Or are some pre-drilled/tapped?
Most would not. Usually slug and turkey models have their receivers tapped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Worc said:
Most would not. Usually slug and turkey models have their receivers tapped.
Well, the thing is, I would like to keep it at just one shotgun. I would think I would use it for deer 1/3 of the time (buckshot and/or slug, wherever local restrictions apply), and something like an Eotech would be a good add-on for extra accuracy/target acquisition. The rest of the time I use it for mainly waterfowl and sometimes upland. Should I get an all-purpose model and drill/tap it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think I'll probably go for the SX3. Quality-wise it might not be as good as the SBE2 or Extrema2 but I probably wouldn't notice the difference anyway, and I can't ignore the price completely either.

Thanks for everyone's advice
 

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rishu_pepper said:
The following are what I am looking for:

1) semi-auto (must)
2) suitable for hunting upland, waterfowl, and deer
3) holo sights (I am pretty set on Eotech); thus pre-drilled/tapped would be nice
4) easy to clean/maintain

The following are things that do not factor in my decision:

1) barrel length, as long as it's 24"-28"
2) colour/finish
3) gas or inertia, it's all good (less recoil is always welcome)
4) 3 1/2" would be nice, but not necessary
5) not much of a trap/skeet shooter

Like I said, this is my one and final shotgun, and I'm willing to drop some good coin into it, maybe top out at around $2000 (w/Eotech installed).
There's no need to "drop some good coin" Unless you don't care what you're spending your money on... Everything that you list can be found in the Mossberg 930, plus you would have more tham enough money for optics.

They are extremely reliable and wiil stand up to a lot of use...

Smitty
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, I went down to the local gun store (I live in Canada eh) and handled the SBE2 and Extrema, the SBE2 was sure nice to hold but it was a used gun on consignment (still $1800 Cdn!), and the Extrema just isn't for me ($1600 new). They didn't have the SX3 in stock, unfortunately, but could order it for me from Browning, for under $1000 (3", Composite).

If the SX3 is as good as you say, then my choice is made. With the money I save from buying highest classed semi's, I could install a new Eotech and have money left over for nice accessories as well, and I could always use more ammo.

Thinking hard whether to order soon... :)
 
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