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Doubt it.

Fosters are near full bore, up to .730. ML sabots are not that big to my knowledge. The only sabot for shotgun reloaders I'm aware of is the CCS, and it's one of the most expensive components of the load anyway, so you wouldn't really be saving anything.

But keep thinking... :)
 

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I used to try to put my own sabots together, way back when. Allot of ideas were blown out of the water when they were tried and failed. So far the Lyman sabots, are by far, the best yet. It has very little bore contact, and can be moved at fairly high velocities. The recipes are simple, and easy to put together. I have been doing it for many years now :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ooh! I got another idea!

You can use a 50 caliber muzzleloader bullet, and buy a solid wad, where you drill out a .50" hole and slice it in half so it can fall off the slug from the centrifugal force from the rifling. Then you put the bullet in that drilled hole in the "wad-sabot". How about that?
 

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You know I was going to say .... Stay away from muzzle loader bullets, because most of them are made to soft to withstand the pressures in a shot shell. They will crush, and push out, causing high pressures. Muzzle loaders, for the most part are very low pressure guns.

But now I must say, never mind what I said above, cause it sounds like you want to blow yourself up :shock: Hey, I have nothing against perfecting good loads. But when you start just slapping components together, without ever loading sabots before, you are just asking for trouble.

I really don't want to read about you in the obits, or read any headlines of the paper, stating that a man blew himself up at the target range :? It isn't worth it, when there is loading data out there for sabots like the Lyman sabot.

So I hope you change your mind, and just load some sabots that there are recipes for :D
 

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wileyhunter said:
So far the Lyman sabots, are by far, the best yet. It has very little bore contact, and can be moved at fairly high velocities. The recipes are simple, and easy to put together. I have been doing it for many years now :D
When did Lyman start making sabots? I've seen their slug, the one that looks like a large pellet, but never a sabot.

My definition of a sabot is a bullet held in place by a formed wad designed to shoot from a barrel not the same caliber. Not a 12 gauge slug sitting in a 12 gauge shotgun wad.

I would like to start reloading 50cal sabots, but can't find a sabot wad to hold them or shoot them from a 12 gauge. I know of several commercially manufactured sabots, but none available for reloaders.
 

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Sorry.
I think you will find you are incorrect. That system is based on an expanding cup sabot design (wad). It is in fact just that..... a sabot.
The substantially reduced size of the projectile does not define it as being a sabot or not. ANY projectile that is carried by a 'sleeve' where the projectile is smaller than the bore diameter is acknowledged to be sabot round.

Your preference in what you call it does not change it in fact.
 

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neophyte said:
Sorry.
I think you will find you are incorrect. That system is based on an expanding cup sabot design (wad). It is in fact just that..... a sabot.
The substantially reduced size of the projectile does not define it as being a sabot or not. ANY projectile that is carried by a 'sleeve' where the projectile is smaller than the bore diameter is acknowledged to be sabot round.

Your preference in what you call it does not change it in fact.
From Wikipedia:

A sabot (pronounced "sah-boh") refers to a device named for a shoe used in a firearm or cannon to fire a projectile or bullet that is smaller than the bore diameter. Since a strong seal is needed to trap propellant gasses behind the projectile, and keep the projectile centered in the barrel, something is needed to fill the gap between projectile and barrel, which is the role of the sabot. Firing a small size projectile wrapped in a sabot raises the muzzle velocity of the projectile. Made of some lightweight material (usually plastic in smallbore guns, and aluminum - and in earlier times; wood - in cannon), the sabot usually consists of several pieces held in place by the cartridge or a loose connection. When the projectile is fired, the sabot blocks the gas, and accelerates the projectile down the barrel. When the sabot reaches the end of the barrel, the shock of hitting still air pulls the parts of the sabot away from the projectile, allowing the projectile to continue in flight.
 

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Well, after a lot of work and putting forth ballistic curves and such we were able to get the Montana state school trust lands management agency to catagorize slugs for hunting into three divisions --- Full Bore Size, Wad-Slugs, and Sabot Slugs. Sabot slugs are a no-no for hunting in a couple areas because of the range they are capable of traveling. It took a lot of work to convince the department that "wad-slugs" defined as, "slugs traveling at similar velocities to that of full bore size slugs (below 1,700fps.) and designed to fit inside a shot wad not originally designed for slugs" presented no more public danger due to extended range then conventional full bore size slugs.

So, although I agree that in direct technical terms the wad is being used as a sabot, at least one gov. agency has made a distinction between sabot slugs and "wad-slugs" thanks to the combined efforts of quite a few reloaders who wanted to still hunt with "wad-slug" reloads.
 
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