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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just shot my Fabarm Axis RS-12 in about an hour of drizzle/light rain. I wiped it down at the club and took it apart as soon as I got home to wipe and clean it. But I have not yet taken the stock off. Do you think there is a need to take the stock off and clean everything in case some moisture got in?

Thanks, Jim
 

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I hunt in the rain snow and sleet all the time with SxS and O/Us. I don't take the stocks off - for most of them I can't. I would clean it appropriately and not sorry about it. I have a Parker VH that has been used for waterfowling for 100 years and has never had the stock removed. It's just fine. Others will disagree.
 

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jrmev said:
I just shot my Fabarm Axis RS-12 in about an hour of drizzle/light rain. I wiped it down at the club and took it apart as soon as I got home to wipe and clean it. But I have not yet taken the stock off. Do you think there is a need to take the stock off and clean everything in case some moisture got in?

Thanks, Jim
There's no way to know for sure if stock removal (or at least loosening of the stock bolt) is necessary until it's too late. In other words, you'll never know that you SHOULD have removed the stock unless or until you see a split in the stock.

If you're fortunate, then you'll have no problem. However, if you SHOULD have removed the stock but didn't, you won't know it until it's too late to do anything about it.

My advice is if the (wooden) stock got more than just a few rain drops on it, then I'd at least loosen the stock bolt as soon as possible after shooting. Better still is to remove the buttstock completely. Good luck.
 

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An hour of light rain/drizzle? If it were my gun I would do just as you did and then go home and put it under a fan for the evening.

If you are still worried, removing the stock now will give you some practice for when you get caught in a heavy downpour in the future.

Demi
 

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I have had some guns that were drenched internally after being in the rain, and most that were not. Not a big deal to pull the buttstock and check on most guns.
 

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If you brought the gun home in a gun case, make sure you dry that well, too, or you will find that carrying guns in it in the future will be "bad news"!

And most shooters forget that important consideration, then wonder how rust suddenly appeared on a well-cleaned gun!
 

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I use a hair dryer to carefully warm the internal parts of my guns and drive out moisture after I've shot in a sprinkle. After shooting in a downpour, I usually tear them down. That's not always easy if you have engraved tang screws, etc. to deal with. That requires extra care and consequently more time. When I can, I pay attention to the forecast and shoot a "rain gun" where practical.
 

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I've pulled the stock from my Winchester 101 after hunting in the rain and found water in the lockwork. It's a good idea to check rather than leave moisture inside to potentially cause rust but, as oldbirdhntr said, that may require extra time and care.
 

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My experience is taking the stock off is not a big deal after the first time. The biggest problem for me is removing the recoil pad as doing that too many times makes the screw holes in the wood get too big. So on my main gun, which uses a special stock removal tool, I had an opening drilled through the recoil pad so it no longer has to be removed to take the stock off. So after shooting in the rain or wet snow, or wanting to reactivate the safety for hunting, it's easy to remove the stock and let it dry thoroughly.
 

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jrmev said:
I just shot my Fabarm Axis RS-12 in about an hour of drizzle/light rain. I wiped it down at the club and took it apart as soon as I got home to wipe and clean it. But I have not yet taken the stock off. Do you think there is a need to take the stock off and clean everything in case some moisture got in?

Thanks, Jim
Do you know how to take the stock off your shotgun?

It's pretty simple.

Have you tried it, yet?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
SuperXOne

I could not get the stock off. I have taken stocks off Browning's, CG's and Beretta's with screwdrivers and Allen wrenches but the Fabarm has a bolt. It looks like it is going to take a long, thin walled socket to get the bolt loose. None of my sockets could get down in there. So we will just have to wait and see. Thanks again for all the comments.

Jim
 

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hi may not be the same here but i had the same trouble with a fabarm h4 no sockets were thin enough to get to the bolt i used a torch and noticed the bolt was sloted so i got an old screwdriver and ground it down to a perfect fit, easy as now
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So I emailed Fabarm and they said it was a 10mm bolt. Because of the bracket into which the recoil reducer screws I needed a thin wall socket. Took the stock off and everything looked fine. I still cleaned and lubed it and put it back together. I never thought of doing it with my other guns but on the base of the stock I wrote "10mm bolt" with a Sharpie for when I take it off next.

Thanks for all the comments, Jim
 
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