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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok guys. I just bought a 12 gauge red label about two weeks ago. I have not had a chance to shoot it yet. I don't understand why so many people seem to be opposed to the red labels. I would just like to know how many red label owners have ever had any trouble with their guns, and if so, what kind of problems have you experienced? It makes me feel a little bit better to hear how good ruger's customer service is, but I really want to know if ruger's are more prone to have defects and malfunctions than other brands? I have also heard it said that the internal mechanics of the ruger are not quite up to snuff compared to the "B" guns. So lets hear it, do I need to trade the red label in and spend a few hndred dollars more and get a better shotgun, or will I get good service from the ruger? Thanks.
 

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I don't understand why you would consider trading in a shotgun you haven't shot yet?
Don't judge your shotgun due to opinions formed by others.
I've had my Ruger Red Label out in all types of weather and conditions,hunting upland,waterfowl,shooting skeet and sporting clays for years and it hasn't given me one moment of trouble in years of use.
I've heard others state that Rugers have all kinds of problems but have not had any of them get into specifics,just repeating things that are vague and subjective.
Bottom line,take yor shotgun out to the range and into the field and form your own ideas without any predetermined bias,after that if you don't like the RRL,then decide about what to get next.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dogman, I know it sounds a bit harsh, but I would get more money for the gun if I were to sell it new and unfired. I just don't want to get out in the field and have it malfunction, and be mad at myself because I made an $1,100 mistake. I realize that I could take a new Beretta or browning out in the field and have it malfunction too. I guess what I'm really asking, is has anyone with any gunsmithing experience ever compared the internals of a ruger to the internals of a browning or a beretta? I would really like to know if there is a weakness in the design of the ruger that the other guns don't have. If not, I can't understand why there are so many negative opinions out there about the red label. Thanks.
 

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Jason
Shoot it and decide yourself----what make car do you have?
is it approved by your neighbors?---did you go to the "right college"----do you vote for the "correct canidate"? Should you decide to not shoot your gun it could be classified as unfired--but As new in box--hint not new. Reliability--my bride of 35 years shoots a 1st yr 28 ga at skeet and will not permit me to even consider selling it. Back to the factory to have the auto safety removed---factory did some extra work--gun works great and I guess I dumb enough that unlike my friends that shoot "P" and "K" guns--I do not feel that my gun needs a "tune " every year(at a cost of $150).
Try it --make a decision (hopefully a good one) and learn from it
They are good guns--perhaps not the best--but a good value for the $
 

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Just like when you take the car off the lot, unless you are an FFL holder and bought it from the factory, it's used if you shoot it or not. If you shoot it you know it works and you can tell that to a seller rather than an ambigous never shot it statement.

I have heard of some specific valid problems that Claydoctor had with his, but ones in our family are field guns used for hunting and have had no problems.

There is pleanty of comentary in past threads on this subject, just search and you will have a hard time avoiding them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Truth is, if I were buying an over and under for hardcore clay shooting, it probably wouldn't be a Ruger. I guess I would go with one of the "B" guns. However, since my red label is just for hunting, it probably won't see 10,000 rounds in my entire life, much less 10,000 rounds per year. Hopefully it will be trouble free, only time will tell. I believe that I have about decided to keep it, and try my luck. At least if it breaks, I know ruger will stand behind it. Thanks.
 

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Jason you bring up a point that I have raised as well. From personal experience and about 5 years worth of reading forums like this, I am beyond wondering whether Rugers have more problems with reliability than the B guns. There is no doubt in my mind, they do. The question is why? Is it the design? Is it assembly problems? Is it the quality of the metallurgy? Somebody, somewhere knows something and if Ruger knows what's wrong, why can't they fix it? Now I'm starting to read posts about people sending back their Gold Labels for this and that problem, leading me to believe the new gun is nothing more than a Red Label with the barrels turned 90 degrees.
 

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Well, JasonH, I have three RRL's and a good friend has two more. Among the five guns there's been ZERO problems...and many, many rounds through every one of them. They are all field guns...but have been used for clays to sharpen skills prior to opening of hunting season. I feel, for the money, they are one heck of a good buy.

Shoot and enjoy! Remember the reasons you bought the gun in the first place.

Good luck and good shooting
hunter20ga
 

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Jason, Take the darn thing out and shoot it. I assume thats what you bought it for. I have 3 Rugers that have all had a few thousand shots fired on the skeet range an no problems at all.
You will find Ruger bashers are seemingly hard core fanatics . Half of what they complain about is just rumors they heard from someone else and took it as gospel.
I recently removed the stock from a 1991 model 12 ga, RL . It was clean as a pin inside. My opinion of the internal parts are
that they are solid and strong. The biggest difference you will see is that there are more castings that machined parts. And there is nothing wrong with the as they seem to be well designed. JMOFWIW.
 

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I just have to chime in here. Why in the world did you buy a shotgun if you have second thoughts before you have even shot it? Give me a break dude. It is not like you mortgaged your house or something. The Red label has been around a long time and has a solid reputation of being a great field gun. It is a very nice looking gun and should work fine as long as you own it. You must have liked something about it to buy it in the first place. Are you having buyers remorse? If you love shotgunning I doubt this will be the last shotgun you buy, but it is a nice edition to your collection. You may go through many shotguns before you really find one you love (like women?) Just go out and shoot it and enjoy it-It is a great gun for the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok guys, I get the point. I am no longer having second thoughts about buying the red label. I guess I just read a few posts by some people who have unfortunately had bad experiences with the red label, and got a little scared. As I said earlier, two things sold me on the red label. American made, and Ruger's customer service. I'm sure that I will get years of dependable service out of my red label, and if something does break, I'm sure Ruger will take care of it. Apparently they often take care of it even if it was your fault, such as breaking the stock. I have a feeling you wouldn't get that kind of service from one of the "B" gun makers. After reading all of the responses on this board, I believe that I made the right decision, and I plan on going out and shooting the gun very soon. I'll let you guys know how it goes.
As a side note, I spoke with my local gunshop owner today. He had just gotten off the phone with a lady from ruger. Apparently the price of the Red Label went up by slightly over $100.00 about two weeks ago, and according to her, it is getting ready to go up again come first of the year. I guess we will have to wait till the 2006 Ruger catalog comes out to know for sure. If my calculations are correct, that will put the MSRP of the red label somewhere around $1,800.00. If you are looking to add another red label to the collection, looks like you better do it soon, before they get out of reach for most of us. Thanks for all the advice.
 
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