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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand this has become a nuisance question but there is no link.

Other Frequently Asked Questions
1. Difference Between Old AA & New AAHS Hulls
2. Primer Brisance
3. What Wad to Use
I am assuming this would pertain to the gray versus red hull and I am curious about the difference.

Thanks,

Dusty
 

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Right now your best option would be to do a search.

I need to find a definitive post and link it to ensure accurate information is correlated with the post.

It's on my list of TO DOs... :wink:
 

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Dusty said:
I understand this has become a nuisance question but there is no link.

Other Frequently Asked Questions
1. Difference Between Old AA & New AAHS Hulls
2. Primer Brisance
3. What Wad to Use
I am assuming this would pertain to the gray versus red hull and I am curious about the difference.

Thanks,

Dusty
The only difference in the 12 GA WW AA hulls is the color of the pigment in the plastic. Some folks will say that the silver lasts better than the gray, which last better than the red. The truth is durability is totally dependant on the plastic in the hull and what it has been put through for loadings, and guns. The recipes that are used in them are the same with similar ballistics. There is a minute capacity difference in the old CF hulls and the new HS hulls.
WW had a suggestion list for the new HS hulls that included an increase of the precrimp( lower the precrimper until a eraser on a wooden pencil would not fit into the hole, I have used a spent primer as they are more readily available at my bench than a pencil.
The list also included an increase of the wad pressure to 30-40 on the pressure gauge. This apparently was to insure that the wad slipped into the new separate base-wad.
Use the wad suggested by your favorite manuf. based on what your desired shot charge might be. Ask a question on this forum, you can get straight answers.
Primer Brisance, HMMMM, at this time, primer price might be a better subject to consider. My suggestion is the 209 primer from Nobel Sport in a package of 5000 from Gamaliel. Load them according to recipes that call for WW-209 primers as they have been ruled interchangable by Hodgdon Powder Co. in their printed manual.
http://www.gamaliel.com/cart/product.ph ... 480&page=1
Ask them how much powder and primers you can combine to get the maximum effect out of your HazMat fee.
 

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Dusty said:
1. Difference Between Old AA & New AAHS Hulls
There's a major difference in the old AA and new AAHS hull, and it has nothing to do with color: They're totally different hull designs.

The AA is a one-piece (with the exception of the brass), compression-formed hull; the AAHS is a two-piece hull with a separate basewad and uses an entirely different formula for the plastic, which allows more reloads with acceptable crimps than the plastic in the older hull.

However, owing to the design of that separate basewad, the interior of the AAHS retains much of the "tapered" characteristics of the older compression-formed hull, although the case contains slightly more volume. In general, the same wads can be used in AAHS and any Remington hulls. Current Remington hulls are all compression-formed.

Color is simply a pigment added to the plastic of any hull and has nothing to do with a hull's physical design or performance.

2. Primer Brisance
All modern shotshells use 209 primers. "Brisance" is a ballistician's term referring to the shattering power of an explosive. While it loosely refers to "hotness," it has little or no application for shotshell primers, which behave differently with different shotshell components. Since there's no such thing as a specifically quantitative scale of brisance related to small arms primers, the term is basically meaningless.

3. What Wad to Use
That depends entirely on the hull, its design — whether tapered internally or straight-walled -- and how it will fit with the powder and shot to produce acceptable crimps.

Straight-walled hulls contain more volume than tapered, and therefore require wads of a wider diameter to avoid gas blow-by and powder migration above the overpowder cup.
 
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