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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new Rem. 1100, and will be shooting light to medium loads most of the time. I have already tried some 2.75 dram x 1 oz. shells, and they didn't feed well at all. I shot 10 shells (3 dram x 1.125 oz), and had one that didn't feed.

Is there a few things that I can change to make the gun light load friendly?
 

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The Rem 1100 is set up for 2 3/4" shells ONLY or 3" shells ONLY. The barrel is marked to tell you which. It will not shoot both through the same barrel.

The 1187 will shoot both through the same barrel.

Either way, in order to shoot light loads reliably, the gas ports must be tuned. I recommend taking it to a COMPETENT gunsmith so he can do the work.

Thanks,
Lee
 

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I was just going mention that my 1100 Sporting 12 is a 2-3/4" only, and I never have a problem with it cycling, even with the lightest of loads.

I was going to indicate that if yours was 2-3/4" only as well, to be sure that gas ports are clean and unobstructed, the slide assy, mag tube and piston(s) are nice & clean, and a new rubber O-gasket is in place...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was wrong. I looked up the 1100 that I have, and it is a 2 3/4 only. I never knew that the 1100 would not shoot both, but thats ok, most of what I shoot is small game.
 

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One other thing I was just thinking about now that you indicate yours is 2-3/4" too...

My 1100 is a pretty new firearm, just purchased new this past Spring. One change that Remington has recently made to the 1100 12 Ga. series (not sure about the 20 Ga., but can report that my sons new 1100 LT-20 youth uses a two piece piston) is using a gas piston that is a single piece unit. If I'm not mistaken, all older 1100 12 Ga.'s use a two piece piston assy. Don't know if this makes for more efficient operation or not, just a difference that I'm aware of.

And again, be REALLY SURE that the magazine tube (the tube the piston(s) slide on) is totally clean, especially where the little notch in the tube is at that holds the rubber O-ring in place. That little notch gets powder fowling in there that is the devil to clean totally. Pay special attention to just how smooth the piston(s) ride down that magazine tube. If this 1100 is pretty old and has fired thousands upon thousands of shots, you may be looking at a worn magazine tube and/or pistons as well which may require replacement to get it functioning perfect again. What's the black finish of the magazine tube look like? Is most of the paint/black color missing and you're down to the bright metal finish mostly? I'm not sure, but those magazine tubes may be impregnated with a semi-solid lubricant such as graphite that keeps them slippery (this is commonly done with all sorts of metal to metal contact situations). Once that black graphite coating is mostly gone, it becomes the dickens to keep the metal parts sliding across one-another efficiently, and efficiency is what you're looking for when shooting light loads - the smallest amount of resistance to the piston operation as possible. These parts aren't that expensive either if it boils down to that, and something that most anybody can do themselves without the aid of a gunsmith. Although a gunsmith would probably just have a moments look at it and tell you what likely needs to be done without any guessing.

Just throwing out some ideas...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This gun is new. I got it out of the box yesterday, and shot around 15 shells through it. The gun more than likely shoots what it is ment to shoot fine, but I would like to tune it to shoot light loads (2 3/4 dram x 1 oz)for my wife to shoot skeet, and sporting clay with me.
 

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Don't even think about "tuning" the gun or making any changes to it until you have thoroughly cleaned all the grease off the moving parts and fired at least 250 to 300 high velocity 2 3/4" 1 1/8 ounce loads. :!: Also, lubricate the magazine tube, piston, and action bars with Breakfree CLP.

Do this and report back when you've done it. I just did this to a new 1100 recently and I know a little bit about it. :lol: You've GOT to break it in and keep it lubricated. :!:
 

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Your 1100 rem is set up for field loads, if the lighter target loads are going to be used I would suggest opening up the orifices on the barrel to cylce, but keep in mind that this will add battering when going to magnum 2 3/4 loads!

Or just switch brands to a higher quality ammo and stay away from those DOVE & QUAIL " cheap shells and save those for the pumps and o/u, single shots.

RON KONTOWSKY
ACTIONS BY R.A.K.
 

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Another solution is to buy a 2-3/4 chamber target barrel for it (I understand they have 2 holes for gas ports) and it will work fine with very light loads.

Just remember to change back when you go out hunting with big boomer loads - with 2-3/4" mag loads, the gun will pound itself to death in short order... and if you try to shoot 3" shells, they won't chamber in the 2-3/4 barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This gun also has two ports, but they may be smaller. The problem with buying a new barrel is that a replacement sheet barrel is 75% of what I paid for the whole gun new.
 

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wwb said:
Another solution is to buy a 2-3/4 chamber target barrel for it....

...and if you try to shoot 3" shells, they won't chamber in the 2-3/4 barrel.
The 1100 standard IS chambered for 2 3/4 inch shells unless it specifically says 3" Magnum on the barrel.

Unfortunately, 3" shells often WILL chamber in 2 3/4" chambers. You see, the chamber length of 2 3/4" is the length AFTER the shell has been shot and the crimp has opened. So a 3" shell is actually less than 2 3/4" in length BEFORE if has been fired. Therefore, it will chamber in most 2 3/4" chamber guns, but the problem occurs when you fire it. The crimp tries to open into the forcing cone of the 2 3/4" barrel and there just isn't enough room for it to open fully. Pressures rise dramatically! :!: The barrel might explode. This is obviously an unsafe situation. :cry: So don't try to check to see if a gun is a 3" magnum by seeing if a 3" shell will fit into the chamber. That doesn't mean a thing.
 

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BUCK said:
This gun is new. I got it out of the box yesterday, and shot around 15 shells through it. The gun more than likely shoots what it is ment to shoot fine, but I would like to tune it to shoot light loads (2 3/4 dram x 1 oz)for my wife to shoot skeet, and sporting clay with me.
mine does the same thing. .
it will shoot 1oz and 1 1/8 oz loads that are 1240fps or faster+ but not winchester light target 1 1/8oz loads.
any suggestions for me to try?mine is 2/34 and has new oring and is extrmely clean and lightly lubed.
thanks for your time.

victor
 

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Hadaway,
It's a bit misleading saying that an 1100 is either for 2 3/4" shells or 3"shells but not both.While its true that you can only shoot 2 3/4" shells in a barrel chambered for such,a 3" chambered barrel will shoot both 2 3/4" and 3" shells.It's more of a cycling issue.I' ve got a 3" chambered barrel that shoots and cycles loads down to 3 1/4 dram quite efficiently(3 dram when it's just had a thorough cleaning)The single gas port can be opened up to cycle the lighter 2 3/4 dr loads,which I've also done.I can't make it work well enough though to cycle my 2 1/2 dr loads with a single port gun. Such modifications do render the barrel useless for the 3" magnums however.
Dave
 
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