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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at a new Remington 1100 "Sporting 20" as a potential upland gun (very nice wood, too). I am wondering if there is anything particular about this gun that makes it more appropriate for sporting clays and any less suitable for upland hunting than earlier 1100s. My impression is that it is simply marketed as a sporting clays gun (because they don't want to detract from the 11-87 as their "flagship" bird getter), but the gun would function equally well on the field. Am I missing anything?
 
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Not missing a thing. The only difference is that it comes with a set of sporting chokes rather than "field" chokes. Magazine capacity is the same. Choes are SK, IC, LM, M. Very nice upland gun.
 

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I don't why you would need a 3in shell for Pheasants or Grouse.

Correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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2 3/4 20 gauge isn't a whole lot for wild pheasant even on especially on long shots. It isn't impossible but your going to need a good shot every time you pull the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think the 20-g makes up in quickness what it loses in downfield power. I really feel the difference in weight toward the end of the day when I start getting fatigued. In fact, I probably shoot better than I would if I had been lugging something bigger around.

Plus, I already have a 3-inch gun. If I follow Mossberg's advice then I'd have no reason to get another, right?
 
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My daughter killed her first pheasant with a 28ga last season when she was 12 years old. She had been shooting for only 2 months total. I would assume anyone who is a reasonably good shot could certainly kill a pheasant or grouse with a
2 3\4" 20 gauge. If not then they perhaps should stick to clay targets.
 

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A 2 3/4" 20 gauge shell is plenty for either grouse or pheasant if you do your part right. I really like the saying that one of the posters uses here (I forget which one), that says, "You can't shoot a big enough gun to miss them dead." Very true. :lol:
 

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2-3/4" 20 ga is plenty of gun for any pheasant hunting I'm familliar with! You can get 1 oz. loads if you think you need them and if you just must you can handload 1 1/8 oz loads for 2-3/4" 20 ga. 3" is overkill, in fact counter productive in my opinion, but, what do I know??

BP
 

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I agree with Burnt Powder. I have shot plenty of pheasants with 20 ga. 2 3/4 and 28 ga. My old Ithaca M37 is 2 3/4 and actually if I shoot baby "magnums"...2 3/4 with 1 1/8 oz...I am hurting at the end of a long day! And when I shot a Citori 20 ga. with 3" chambers using the 1 1/4 oz loads....it was very counter productive...recoil is very bad in a double with those shells. 20 ga. 2 3/4 is a completely adequate load for pheasant and grouse. Most of my kills with 20 ga. have been with 1 oz. at no more than 35 yards. My 2 cents.
 
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