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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My father recently granted me permission to take one of his 1100's for pheasant/dove use, so we went dove hunting at his place before I returned home from a weekend visit. Well it only shot once, it would not autofeed, turns out when he changed the barrels the O-ring was in the other one... (likely story :D) So we get back home and sure enough the O-ring was in the other barrel, so in a few seconds he proclaimed the gun ready to go, so I loaded it up and brought it home.

This morning I go out to shoot some doves and what do you know it still is only firing one round. I took it apart and the O-ring is still in place. I mean it doesn't even try to eject the shell, anything else I can look at before I take it in to a GS to check out?

Thanks
 

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What you should look for is if this is a magnum 12ga, meaning only 3" or hih brass mag 2 3/4" shells will work, Check to make sure the the piston seals are on correctly, and try a different brand of ammo, auto loaders can be kinda picky so do not use any cheap $3.00 or $4.00 abox hunting loads.

RON KONTOWSKY
ACTIONS BY R.A.K.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
this is a 20ga 2 3/4".

I was shooting Winchester 8 Dove and quail load... I took some pictures of it broken down, but I don't have them uploaded yet.
 

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Check to see that the gas ports aren't partially or fully clogged. Be sure that the gun has plenty of lubrication on the receiver rails, action bars, outside of magazine, and on the piston on the magazine tube.

Also, cock the bolt and leave it locked back. Then press the carrier release. The bolt should fly forward into battery. If it does this satisfactorily, then I'll bet that the problem is a dirty magazine tube (inside) or a weak magazine spring. You can clean the inside of the magazine tube. You may need to replace the magazine spring. If the magazine spring doesn't have enough power to push the next shell rearward hard enough to trip the carrier release, then it won't load the next shell. It will simply lay on the carrier with the bolt locked back.

Oh, one other thing. If that doesn't do the trick, you may need to replace the action (recoil) spring in the buttstock.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Also, cock the bolt and leave it locked back. Then press the carrier release. The bolt should fly forward into battery.
It does.

I mean when you shoot, it does nothing, like it is a single shot, you have to pull the bolt back manually and eject the spent shell casing.

I will clean the gas ports and lub it up good and take it back out of town and give it a quick test.
 

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Oh, that's a little better explanation of what is happening. :lol: If the bolt doesn't even come back when you fire it, then it sounds like you've got the piston, piston seal, or O-ring improperly assembled. Or possibly clogged up gas ports. Some 1100's have a one-piece piston/piston seal and some have two separate pieces. These must be assembled correctly. Also, the O-ring must be in the little recess near the front end of the magazine tube. If it is loose, frayed, or broken it should be replaced. Check your owner's manual for a diagram of the correct assembly. Or, check the Remington web site for a similar picture and description.
 

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Ulysses, The gas mechanism should be clean and dry. My Remington manual says "When cleaning, brush or scrape to remove shooting residue. Wipe all parts clean, including gas cylinder attached to barrel and magazine tube. Important: After cleaning gas mechanism parts-wipe clean and dry. Gas mechanism parts include gas cylinder on barrel, barrel seal, piston, piston seal, outer surface of magazine tube, and action bar sleeve". All that is necessary is a light film of oil to prevent the possibility of rust. Keith
 

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Dovehunter,

With all due respect to you and to Remington, I disagree on the best oiling method to keep the autos running smoothly and for the longest period of time between cleanings. If you don't lubricate the 1100/1187 well (including the gas system parts), then you will be fortunate to get 150-175 rounds of target loads through it before it starts hanging up every few rounds. The carbon buildup on the magazine tube becomes very dry and the friction between the moving parts becomes considerable. Also, the cleaning job of removing this dry caked-on powder/carbon residue is considerable.

If you lubricate the parts LIBERALLY with Breakfree CLP, it will run at least twice as long before it starts hanging up. Additionally, since the CLP seems to keep the powder/carbon residue in suspension, cleanup is a breeze. Just take a paper towel or old rag and wipe it off. It's that easy. In between cleanings, I will simply add more CLP to the gas system parts and to the bolt assembly. This will keep it going another couple hundred rounds until you get the time or desire to clean it.

This method of shooting the guns "wet" applies to other autos as well, not just the Remington guns. Although I'd like to take credit for discovering this, I cannot. I got the idea from Bruck Buck (The Technoid) who is a confirmed advocate of running the guns "wet". I was skeptical at first, but after trying it on several different autos, not any more. :!:
 

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I've shot my 1100 dry (gas mechanism) since 1977. No problems so far. I must have a good one, I get a lot of shooting out of mine before having to break it down for cleaning. No debate here Ulysses, we just have different ways. I might try shooting mine wet and see what its all about. Keith
 

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1100's and 11-87's are made to shoot alot of rounds before needing to be cleaned. Take the barrel off and see if you can move the gas piston(s) up and down the mag tube smoothly. No hang ups what so ever are allowed. Next, make sure the gas pistons ( if two ) slots/cuts are NOT aligned. Doing that will vent most of the gas out, and not cycle the gun with light loads. Next make sure the "O" ring is in the groove and has no flat spots or cuts and missing rubber. When in doubt, replace the piston(S) and "O" ring. NU-LINE sells a kit with stainless steel pistons and an Teflon "O" ring. Check on the web for dealers. Brownells and Midway have had the kits for $ 15.00 plus shipping. The kit works very well.
Rob.
 

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There are 4 million 1100s out there so one of us must have the right answer!!

If you are essentially shooting a single shot then you want to check in this order: 1. Proper ring stacking 2. check to see if gas system is crusty 3. shell stop security.

Since you were messing around with the O ring I would guess that the rings are stacked wrong in that they can stack in 24 different combinations and only one is correct.

From the slide weight forward: You want the square ring, the scalloped ring and the O ring. From the outside the square ring looks just that, square. If you lok at its inside circumference, you will see that one edge is beveled. The flat side goes against the slide weight, and the bevelled edge goes towards the muzzle. The scalloped ring has a beveled side and a curved side. The bevel of the second ring fits into the bevel o fht first ring. The o ring comes last. Of the stacking permutations, some will stack thick enough to keep the bolt from fully closing. The safety dimensions built into the receiver prevent its firing with a partially closed but not locked bolt. Other permutations will stack thin enough to let the bolt lock, but it won't cycle because of an insufficient gas seal. A missing or broken O ring will keep the 1100 from cycling with light loads, but some shotguns will cycle with heay loads even without the O ring.

From Gunsmithing: Shotguns...Pat Sweeney...own this book if you own a Rem 1100.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As to running them wet or dry....... Run'em WET with Breakfree CLP or Slip 2000. Only use these 2 products as regular lubes will not work and if it were not for these lubes you would be better to run it dry. I coat the outside of the mag tube, put a little on the rails and inside the piston and piston seal. My son competes on a national level in scholastic sporting clays and after 300 rounds you can wipe off the gunk as the CLP floats the carbon. I have tested to see how many shots I could get without a problem using CLP and made to 1369 shots. No problem, I just could'nt stand knowing I have a dirty gun in the safe. Gotta love those "Green Machines"! Good Shooting

.................
"I don't care if you can get a Brittany Spaniel down the barrel, if it puts 70 percent of the pattern in a 30" circle at 40 yards it's a full choke!" Jack O'Conner
 

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A neighbor and I was looking at his 1100 recently because I have had similar problems. He showed me a small screw located between the barrel and the ring that goes around the mag tube.

He claims this is an adjustment screw that regulates the gas flow trough the gas ports. He measured the opening with a piece of thin wire and made sure the ports was fully open, and since then his gun reloads all kinds of shells with no problems.

I dont remember this screw being mentioned in the owners manual or seeing it in my gun, but it could be worth checking.
 

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Outboarder,

There is no such screw in the 1100 as it comes from the factory. If you saw one on an 1100, it is something that someone rigged up on their own. I think it is highly unlikely that anyone else's gun would have such a screw.
 

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I'm just about certain that my newer 1100 Sporting 12 does not have such a screw, but I'd love to see the pic you have!

Use the link below to take you to the Shotgun World picture upload area:

http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/album_u ... p?cat_id=1

From there it's pretty simple - just point to the pic on your hard drive and submit it for posting to the site, then come back here and give us a link to it...
 

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Dang, Outboarder, what happened to the rib on that gun? :!: Looks like someone used the barrel as a pry bar :lol: and bent the heck out of the rib.

As for the screw on that barrel, it has me puzzled. My 1100 certainly doesn't have a screw there. Actually a screw in that location to adjust the amount of gas fed to the piston seems to be a good idea if a person used it correctly. Open the screw for low powered shells and close it for high power shells. All I can say is, if it works, use it. :lol:
 

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Thanks Nortonics.

The rib got bent before I bought it used, ordered it unseen. But i have now seen the screw on three guns, and I think that maybe the importer ordered a special version. All barrels also have the Cutts compensator on them. The company that sold them for a long time does not exist anymore, so no help from them. Yes, of course I´ll use it if it works. Seems like a good idea, wonder why they dont make all 1100´s that way.
 
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