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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last weekend I purchased a vintage Remington 1900 12 ga SxS at my local Cabelas. The gun had been on the shelf for a while and they discounted it fairly heavily. The final price was right at $1300. When I was a kid and just learing to shoot back in the early 1960s, a neighbor loaned me a 1900 and I developed an affection for the gun at that early point in my life. When I saw the one at Cabelas, I just couldn't resist and took it home. The gun has about 97% blue on the fluid steel 30" barrels. Both are choked full. The chambers are only 2 5/8" which may be the reason the gun did not sell right away. The color case hardening is about 75% color and the stock, checkering, butt plate and all are original and in great shape. The gun is beautiful and has seen very little use in the last 100 years. The bores are mirror like. Now, my question: I can't seem to find much information about this model or the 1894 which preceeded it. There is lots written about Parkers, L.C. Smith, Lefevers, Ithicas, Foxes, and Winchesters, but I don't seem to find much information about these beautiful old Remington doubles. I would like to have the chambers lenthened to 2 3/4" so I could shoot modern ammunition in it. Does anyone know of any reason why this would not be advisable? I am a nostologic kind of guy and to own a 100 year old double gun from the oldest gun maker in America makes me proud and sad at the same time. When I look at this fine old Remington and my L.C. Smith that my grandfather owned, I reflect on what our country once produced, but no longer. If anyone could provide me some information on the 1900, I would be appreciative.
 

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The 1900 was sort of a plain version of the 1894. There were no fancy engraved versions of the 1900. There were 98,508 produced from 1900 to1910. They sold alongside the 1894. Serial numbers were from 300,000 to 398,508. Have the chambers lengthened and shoot the snot out of it.
 

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Charles G. Semmer wrote an excellent book called "Remington Double Shotguns", that will give you all the information you could want. Contact the Remington Society of America to order a copy. I own an autographed copy, and find it to be an excellent resource. At 289 pages, it's a good deal - and reasonably priced for a limited release book that was published nearly 14 years ago.

Roy Marcot's big Remington book "Remington - America's Oldest Gunmaker" is also a good general resource.

Also, Cornell Publications sells reproduction sales brochures and catalogs from a wide variety of gunmakers. She may have Remington brochures from this time period.
 

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Remington Model 1900s are a simplified, cheaper, version of the Model 1894, built on the same patents -- No. 528,507 and No. 528,508 both granted Oct. 30, 1894. The Model 1900s were all K-Grades, with E added to the designation if the gun had ejectors and D if it had Damascus barrels -- K-, KE-, KD-, or KED-Grades. The K- and KE-Grades had Remington Steel barrels. The Model 1900s had a snap-on/off forearm and their serial numbers were in the 300,000 range, often preceded with a stock letter Q.

You need to check out Charles G. Semmer's book Remington Double Shotguns. It is available from the author 7885 Cyd Drive, Denver, CO 80221, for $60 plus $5 shipping and handling. It is invaluable if you are going to shoot, invest, collect or play in the Remington double gun field. Remington supplied a number of different pattern Damascus barrels on these old doubles. A picture of their salesman's sample of the various styles of Damascus available is shown on page 275 of Semmer's book.

Remington Arms Co. stamped the actual pellet counts of their test patterns on the rear barrel lug of their Model 1889 hammer doubles and their Model 1894 and 1900 hammerless doubles. If the number is three digits, that is the count, if the number is two digits a leading 3 is implied. From surviving hang-tags we know the standard load they used to target 12-gauge guns was 1 1/4 ounces of #8 going 511 pellets to the load. My 12-gauge KE-Grade Model 1900 is stamped 33 on the left and 24 on the right. That would be 333/511 = 65% left and 324/511 = 64% right, or about improved modified in both barrels. The chokes measure .027" in both barrels of that gun.

If your gun has survived over 100 years in such nice condition, I sure wouldn't go changing anything. There are plenty of proper shells from great suppliers like RST. There is no reason to be subjecting these vintage guns to Wally World modern SAAMI spec ammo.
 

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:) This is wonderful information on the Remington 1900. About 25 years ago I picked up a 1900 off a used gun rack in Olympia, WA. The bores are perfect but the action has a bit of rust inside. Fine rust, as if it had gotten wet and then set in the corner. The stock had been broken and repaired at some time but the cross wood was still split. I also have an L. C. Smith, a Fulton and a Winchester 24 so I wanted the Remington to kind of round out the gun case. Believe it or not, I have never shot this fine old gun as I do a lot of (Not as much as I should.) tinkering with my guns and I dismantled this fine old double and when the cross pieces of the stock fell out I never reassembled it. I found the information concerning the barrel markings by "Researcher #1" to be excellent and they answered some questions I have always wondered about. Today I pulled the gun out of the vault and checked the markings. The barrels are marked \\\ KEY. The barrel stud is marked 50 and 64. The serial numbers, 362660, match through out. There is an additional number of 6083 stamped under the screw on the forearm. I have started again on the restoration of this fine old piece and look forward to shooting it. Can anyone tell me what the "\\\", the "Y" and the "6083" mean? Based on the serial number I am assuming this is a 2 & 3/4" chamber but there are no markings anywhere to confirm. Thanks for this great forum. All of your comments are helpful and professional and are greatly appreciated. There is no room in this life for crude and rude comments. Thanks again.
 

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Most 12-gauge Remington Hammerless Doubles seem to be chambered for the old 2 5/8 inch shell. Some of the surviving hang-tags for old Remington Hammerless Doubles state they were targetted with a load of 1 1/4 ounce of #8 shot in a 2 5/8 inch UMC Nitro Club shell. Here is one such hang tag, scanned fron Charles Semmer's book Remington Double Shotguns, page 260 --



Here is the page from the 1905 UMC catalogue showing that load --



Charles suggests in his work on these old Remington doubles that the extra four-digit number found on some of these guns is a factory assembly number. He also speculates that the /// mark may indicate full choke. Many of these markings we will likely never know for sure what they mean and it will remain a topic of speculation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I started this thread and I want to thank you for all of the great information. I live in the Kansas City area and I took my 1900 to Simmons and had them lengthen the chamber to 2 3/4" so I could at least use it with low brass modern ammunition. The cost for this was less than $150. Lengthening the chamber by 1/8" is really no big deal and it will allow the use of modern ammunition. Now I can enjoy this fine old gun. I do not plan to shoot anything in it that exceeds 3 dram equivalent.
 

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I recently picked up a model 1900 KED and I'd like to find out more about it. Would anyone be able to show the Damascus pattern options?
 
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