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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Long time since I've written (I guess I only call when I have a problem!). Last week my sons-in-law and I went out to Nebraska to hunt pheasants. We had a great time running around in the snow, and got a few birds. But we were severely handicapped by two separate gun problems--both unfortunately afflicting the same son-in-law.

First, his O/U frequently would only fire one shot; it would fire either barrel, but not the second, if you follow. I am not familiar with Browning O/U's other than the Citori, but this was a CGI or CTI or something similar, single selective trigger; it had worked fine for him for several months in North Carolina, shooting skeet. My first thought was that it was the cold--when we set out it was two degrees; but by the last day it was 30 degrees, and still the gun would not fire the second barrel. Anyone tell me what's likely going on?

The 870 is even more mysterious to me. It's a 3 inch magnum, but on this trip we were all three shooting the same shells, which were 2 3/4 inch, 1 1/4 oz. The first ones we shot were Remington Nitro's, green shells with high brass; they did fine for the 870 and the rest of us. But we ran low, and bought some Federals at Wal-Mart, same load but lower brass: In the 870, these red shells after firing would jam in the chamber, so tight we had to get out pliers and pull them out! It was as if the plastic part had expanded so much that the extractor couldn't budge them--I never saw such a thing. The rest of us, shooting a double barrel and a Browning A5, had no such problem.

Any solutions to these two mysteries would be most welcome. (It was still a great trip--saw literally hundreds of pheasants, even if we only bagged nine. If hens were legal...Oh, my!)
Beach004
 

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On the browning....My guess is that it has inertia triggers vs. mechanical and the shooter was not getting the gun tight to his shoulder. Inertia triggers require recoil to operate properly and without the gun being tight to the shoulder they may not.

On the 870...I have also seen this. Those Federal shells probably had the cheap "brass"....that silver crap, don't know what it really is. It expands and gets stuck in the chamber.

P_102
 

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On the Browning... Are you sure he was releasing the triggers? I actually have done this myself, and thought something was wrong w/ the gun but actually it was me :oops: Maybe in the excitement of the birds and having a good time, he was not depressing the trigger enough.

I've seen this happen w/ other people as well who have not shot double barrels very often w/ a single trigger.
 

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I am not an expert by no means on the Brownings but two things come to mind.
1. If your son-in-law was wearing gloves maybe the thichness of the material was affecting the trigger release as mentioned above.
2. If your son-in-law uses any kind of lube in the action, the cold weather may be causing it to thicken and affect the re-setting of the trigger for the second shot.

Just my $.02

Rick
 

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I would suggest cleaning and re lubing the action on the over under. Sometimes old lubricant can cause the trigger to not reset for the second shot. In the field you can usually bang the recoil pad against something solid and the trigger will work after that.

The problem with the 870 I believe is what the others said about the base metal. I have seen the cheap Federals jam in other guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For economy's sake I have waited and will respond to all the responses at once.
The suggestions about the O/U may well be on target, especially with regard to lubricant; in the field there didn't seem to me to be any way to get to the working part of the trigger mechanism; now that we are back in NC, we can take that part out and see if it's gunked up--the gun is second-hand, so it could well be, and the cold would influence that. FWIW, back in our (warm) motel room, I "shot" the first barrel, thumped the gun on the floor, and the second barrel "fired" then just fine. Not holding it tightly, or not releasing the trigger, I could see, but not repeatedly--and especially not with high-powered loads such as we were shooting.
The 870 is a greater puzzle; it has shot a variety of shells for years, most of them cheap and low-powered; why it should balk at this one particular type of Federal shell, a shell that shot just fine in our other two guns, is a mystery. I suppose the 870 might have an especially tight chamber (it was not a dirty chamber--we checked that); but it's never been a problem before.
Well, we have till next fall (alas) to figure out what's going on. Hard to wait; maybe spring turkeys will help a little. Thanks to all readers and responders
Beach004
 

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Long time since I wrote as well, but me being the son-in-law in question, I thought that I might add some more insight into the situation and see if anyone else has more suggestions. With the latter being true, that the o/u would fire in the motel room with simply banging the butt on the floor, I would be willing to agree that the trigger is an inertia group. Seeing as how this firearm as shot many of skeet in its day, I can't forsee not releasing the trigger as the problem either. I think that backing out the trigger group and cleaning it with a non-sticky degreaser will probably be the best answer. Anyone got any good tricks or things to stay away from???

As far as the 870 goes, I can't believe that it would balk at a lesser grade shell in a "low brass" model. It has been used as a dove gun shooter way lighter and lesser brand shells with no problem. Could it be more the idea that someone prior pointed out that the "silver brass" actually froze to the gun barrel???
 
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