Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On my newer 1100's, 870's and 11/87's the shell latches are held in place in the receivers. After several years they tend to fall out, (making reassembly very tough). My question is; #1. Should the shell latches be replaced? and #2. What is supposed to hold them in the receiver in the first place? Just a tight fit that loosens up over time? Any help would be appreciated... :?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
dueeast,
It wouldn't hurt to get new shell latches. They are staked in.
Cost is going to be around $40 for both latches and labor. See what Remington will charge you. Not all shops have the tooling.
I know Vang does it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
All you should need, provided there are no breaks, is to have them re-staked. I would think any gunsmith has the staking tool and should be able to accommodate you for minimal cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
The feed latches are staked in place, and have been since these models were introduced over 40 years ago. As you may have already found out, if the feed latch becomes unstaked, you'll need three small hands to reassemble the gun!

Considering that over 8 million M870s and over 3 million M1100/1187 Remingtons have been produced so far, I believe any competent gunsmith should be able to handle this in short order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,858 Posts
it is very simple,it takes longer to take the gun apart than it does to stake the latches in..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
The trick to putting an unstaked latch back in place is to first remove the stock. You then only need two hands to put it back together.
Good Luck
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,203 Posts
I wish I had a Remington receiver in the shop so I could photograph an easy set-up for staking the latch in place. I use a small vise grip to hold the latch in position, with a popsicle stick on the outside (to protect the receiver) and a trigger assembly pin in place (in order to insure proper positioning of the latch). The latch is then held in proper position and both your hands are free. You can use a staking tool to tighten the existing stakes or an automatic center punch can be used to work the lower stakes inward to secure the part. Remove the trigger plate pin and the vise grips and your troubles are over.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top