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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not long ago, I purchased a Tristar Viper G2 in synthetic, and it has proven to be a good decision for my purposes. However, the LOP with stock shims in place is 14 5/8, and I prefer 14 1/4 for a hunting gun. In addition, the original recoil pad would hang up on my shirt or vest about every 4 mounts. It's probably a Pachmayr 250 or clone, and 1" thick. I decided to shorten the LOP and resolve the pad issue by replacing the original pad with a Kickeez pad in 3/4" thickness (which is actually more like 5/8" thick, with about half the pad being the base. I could have cut the stock, but I hate making permanent commitments, so I opted for more work that could be reversed if I didn't like the result.

The end result is good. The Kickeez pad felt sticky/tacky out of the box, in spite of the shiny, smooth surface, but that resolved by the time I was done fiddling with it. I think there's a bit more felt recoil with the thinner pad, which has about half the padding of the old one.

I don't know the structure of every synthetic stock out there, but replacing the recoil pad is far more complicated than on a wood stock. For anyone who is considering replacing a recoil pad, here's my experience. I'm sure other folks would come up with other ways to solve the problems, probably easier than what I did, but this method fit my skill set.

The first very substantial problem in replacing the pad is that the screw holes for the original pad are 3 3/4" apart and the holes for the new pad are 3 1/8". The stock itself is hollow, unlike a wood stock, so I couldn't just drill new holes in the stock. Drilling new holes at the wider spacing would screw up the new pad, IMO.

The second substantial problem with the synthetic stock is that the screw holes in the stock are inset about 1/4" below the surface of the stock. The original recoil pad has a special, machined/routed base to fill this gap, but the replacement pad was just flat, and didn't have the thickness needed to rout the base.

My solution was to make a spacer to insert into the stock which would attach at the existing screw holes, and provide a base for the new pad and allow for screw holes wherever needed, just like a wood stock. I could have made the spacer out of wood, but the wood could get wet and swell when I fall on my face crossing a muddy creek (a near sure thing for me, hence the purchase of a synthetic, aka waterproof, gun) I had some plastic material I bought years ago from the local college engineering department when they were selling off excess materials. The exact type of plastic is a mystery. An inexpensive 1/2" thick pad spacer could be used in exactly the same way. I had to do some sanding of the thickness of the spacer as the screw posts in the stock are recessed at differing depths. The spacer and extra screws weigh just under 4 oz, which is undesirable to me, but acceptable since the gun was just a tad muzzle heavy.

Here's the inside of the stock:
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Here's the spacer I made, note that I used a Forstner bit to 'rout' the spacer at the screw posts, so it would end up flush with the end of the stock :
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Here's the spacer in place in the stock. Note the second set of screw holes for the Kickeez pad:
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From there, I just screwed the spacer to the stock, and mounted the Kickeez pad in the usual way. I haven't ground the pad to fit yet, as I want to try it out and make sure I'm happy with it first. Voila'!
 

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Good solution but is recoil spring in buttstock on this gun. If so i,d drill appropriate size hole with hole saw centered over retaining nut to allow disassembly for cleaning and removal of buttstock. Big enough to allow you access of nut with socket .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No springs in buttstock. A hole for a 13mm socket might be a good idea to allow stock removal without removing the insert, but I think I've got it shimmed where I want it and won't be taking the stock off often.
 
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