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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Sorry to break the news, but your gun is a "Pride of Spain" gun that has a very poor reputation for reliability. They were cheap guns imported into the US in the 1970s.

The maker is Zamacola Hermanos (makers mark is H over Z in a vertical oval under a crown); not to be confused with Zabala Hermanos (ZH in an oval). "Hermanos" is Spanish for "brothers." The latter made some decent guns, the former produced price-point guns for export to the US, primarily. You will find the Zamacola Hermanos guns bearing a variety of US (and maybe other) importer names.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes I see the HZ stamp: however I also see a CH stamp, X, HP and a 2 in between 2 guns?
The wood to metal work is beautiful and especially the fore stock? Are the additional stamps other workers on the gun? I've seen many cheap side by sides and this looks great in comparison. The lock-up is tight and it smokes sporting clay birds?
 

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The other stamps on the barrel flats include proof marks, inspection marks, caliber/gauge, chamber length, etc.

Fit, finish and wood is only one aspect of quality in guns. Other very important aspects include parts design and parts quality, along with good workmanship. The Pride of Spain guns generally failed in that second area. As with any gun...even cheap ones...some of those guns worked well, but the failure rate was significantly higher than better-built guns.

If your works well, that's great. Just realize that if a part fails, replacements will either be unavailable or will need to be hand-crafted; an expensive process.
 

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Absolutely no offense intended OldSkeeter, but you're off base on this one. The model name "Pride of Spain" is a creation of the shotgun importer rather than the shotgun maker and tell us nothing about the shotguns to which it was applied.

Zamacola Hermanos, like just about all of the artisanal Spanish shotguns makers, produced shotguns to every price point at which a demand existed. The price point of all these guns was determined by the amount and style of engraving, and by the presence of add-ons such as self-opener mechanisms. Zamacola produced well made, durable, and reliable shotguns at every price point.

That said, you're correct when you described the HZ guns sold under the name "Pride of Spain" as "…cheap guns imported into the US in the 1970s." Other examples of such inexpensive guns include the AyA model 4 and the Ugartechea model 30 and both the model 4 and 30 were made to the same price point as the subject Zamacola Hermanos.

Dan, you have yourself a very nice example of a plain Jane, handmade, Spanish shotgun. It was likely made in the 1960s or 1970s and has been giving good service ever since. That the gun is still tight and works well after forty or fifty years of use tells you more about the durability and reliability of the gun than anything you're likely to learn on the internet.

That's a nice gun - I hope you enjoy it.

Best,
 

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Just to clarify, Zamacola Hermanos was the manufacturer of the "Pride of Spain" guns imported into the US in the '70s. They did make other guns; some of them of better quality than the Pride of Spain version. Not all of their cheap import guns were marked "Pride of Spain." Some just used the phrase "Fine Spanish." Given the information provided by the OP, one would have to assume his gun is, in fact, a Pride of Spain import. The barrel flat stamps would seem to support that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you gentlemen. I am pleased with the function of this gun. If it lasts a few years, I'll be happy. The triggers have smooth pull and the action seems very tight and pure. I look forward to purchasing a Perazzi or Caesar Guerini: however, will have fun with my "no-name" Spanish side-by-side or Benelli A4 Xplore.

Thank you

Dan 8)
 

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Just for clarity:

The gun the original poster has appears to be a Zamacola Hermanos model 90.

This gun was proofed in Eibar, in 1961 (proof year code G1).

"Pride of Spain" is a model name made up by the importer, probably Sloan's Sporting Goods, as Sloan seems to have been the biggest seller of guns marked "Pride of Spain".

This gun is "cheap" in the same way that the AyA model 4 and Ugartechea model 30 shotguns were "cheap" guns". All three were simply bottom price point guns that could be had for a good price in Spain and sold for a small profit here in the USA. "Cheap" refers only to price at which they sold, and does not describe their reliability or durability.
 

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Just a car manufacturers made cars to different price points, Spanish gun makers made guns at whatever price point an imported wanted to pay. So an old adage for Spanish guns is to buy the gun and not the name. The gun will speak for itself. The quality of the fit and finish plus extra hand engraving are good indicators of how much effort went into making each gun. Hold the barrels suspended by the lug and gently tap them with a wood handle. They should ring. If they do that will tell you the barrel solder is intact and there's no loose rib. Gun is not proofed for steel, not surprising since it was made in 1961. Most likely your gun is one of many utilitarian boxlock SxS guns imported from Spain, made by one of maker makers, by GOK's number of importers. Wood can be deceiving since many Europeans aren't wood w hor es like many American buyers. Your photo's really don't show a whole heck of a lot of the entire gun, so try to ignore preconceived opinions based upon input based upon your two photos.
 
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