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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone said to me recently in regards to gun restoration that the difference between old money vs. new money is that old money wouldn't bother to restore an older object because its appearance isn't that important, because they can buy whatever they want, whereas new money has the opposite view. Being in the latter camp, that comment really got me to question whether I should bother with restoration of an old gun and just save for a fancier one if that's what I want.

I would be interested in your various opinions on this subject. :?:
 

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It's the old car/new car routine. If you have the money, and everybody knows it, you are not embarassed in driving an old rusty car, as there is nothing to prove to anybody. If you are trying to succeed, to make your mark, you would be embarassed to drive an old, rusty car.

Personally, I think you have to follow your heart. If restoring old guns makes you happy, then I would restore old guns. It is, after all, not a money issue, because a first class restoration will cost you as much as a new gun, in common guns.

It is too bad that more guns can't fall under the category of the Winchester Model 21, where it is almost an obligation to pass this gun down in better condition than you received it, and reblue is a common process, as is wood work....without being a negative to the value.

Winchester Model 12s are being lost at an alarming rate to rust right now, and these guns are common, and should be treated like a 1955 Checy.

Remington
 

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Another take:

If you want to "use and shoot" a gun that might otherwise be unservisable, do so by all means.

If you are into "collecting and showing", in most all cases, restoration will deminish the value.

The guys over on the "Parker Gun Collectors Assn" BBS clearly have stated and proven many times that ORIGIONAL less than perfect is "worth" far more than RESTORED into perfect.

So, what to do? If your purpose is "use and shoot", restore it to your hearts content. If your purpose is "collect and show", orgional is what counts--if it is not origional, you're not in the race.

Not sure it has much to do with how old/new your money is--it has to do whit why you want the gun and where your interest lay (lie?)

Just my thoughts. JB
 
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Restoration of a gun is in the eye of the beholder. When I was 16 I was given a used Model 21 by my father. Restoring the gun brought back to life the gun I had been given. Another gun I had restored was an European combination gun brought back by my father after WWII. The wood had been discolored with the years and the barrels dull. Proper restoration brought out a beautiful light colored walnut stock and the reblueing of the barrels has made the gun one of my prized possesions. I will pass these guns down to my grandsons some day. So, restoring a gun can be more that dollars and cents, but one of family and heritage.
 

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You know, only prizing shotguns that haven't been restored will come to an end, if only because it will be VERY difficult to preserve any gun over 150 years old, because of steel and rust.

My own personal opinion on this subject is that the whole idea of collectibility will change over the next 25 years, and I think many of these issues will be about preservation...which has gone on in the Winchester Model 21, and with houses, which, also, severely decline in condition over the years. You can't expect to keep a 100 yr. old house, without restoring it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree 100%. Not only that, but from an aesthetics standpoint, I personally don't find an older gun, with its bluing worn off and a darkened stock with the checkering smoothed over, very attractive, no matter the pedigree of the gun. I would rather own a new gun or one that has been restored. I'm probably in the minority on this, but I'm curious. Maybe I'll ask that question on another post on the opinion page.
 

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Some old guns look good with a little character. A little worn spot on the blueing, a darkness in the wood where countless days in the field have weather the stock. But I have also see the neglected gun with the blueing shot and stock has a crack in it that has been pinned back together some years ago. I think there is a point at which the value of the restoration will only enhance the value of some guns. Others, if there not far gone just a little wear from the years should be left alone to help share their story to future generations.

APEXDUCK
 
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