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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which one would you choose? I have narrowed it down to the two, but not really sure that I like one over the other. I am torn & need a little advice. The Ruger weighs more & I would think, would help w/ recoil. But, I have heard Rugers kick like mules. Also, I am not a little guy, so maybe the recoil will not be a factor for me, (6'1", 210). However, I really like the vented rib on the Ruger more than the Beretta. It just makes the bead jump right out at me everytime. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Quack..Quack....BOOM!
 

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Sporting Clays...

Occasional shooter who may one day sell his gun:
Beretta.
Frequent shooter who wants an inexpensive entry gun and doesn't care what people think it looks like:
Ruger Red Label.

Why? Well, I doubt you'll ever hurt either gun with normal use, no matter how long you live. The Ruger's also slightly heavier, which will help you control your follow-through and lessen the recoil somewhat.

The Whitewing's a little lighter gun and will hold it's value somewhat better. I've always considered it an upland gun.

Don't drop a grand on a shotgun before you've shot it (or like model). Hang out at the range for a while, you WILL SEE both of these guns come and go if you're determined. Heck, I should have.... I just got lucky.
 

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Dont limit yourself to any until you have shot that model. I normally shoot a 686 E sporting and a squadmate let me shoot his 391 gold sporting and I liked it so much I went and picked one up later that day. I now use my 686 for skeet and the 391 for clays.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I shoot a Red Label sporting clays model on 5-stand and love it. Never shot a Beretta O/U, but I do like their autos. The Ruger does have a couple of quirks. First, it's purposely built to be a "looser" gun. Moving the top lever results in the barrels practically falling down on their own where the Beretta requires a fair bit of force to open the action. However, once closed, the action on the Ruger is rock solid and the looseness has no affect at all on the gun's performance. If you're used to the tight fit of Brownings or Berettas, the Ruger will seem a bit strange. The other notable thing about the Ruger is that the downward angle of the comb is more pronounced than most imported guns, resulting in a bit more "face slap" on recoil and giving the Ruger its' reputation for kicking. In terms of aesthetics, I really like the appearance of the Ruger myself. Mine has beautiful bluing and with the screwless brushed stainless receiver, nicely figured wood, adjustable butt plate and extended choke tubes, it has a serious competition look to it and I get my share of compliments. The adjustable butt plate also goes a long way toward correcting the stock issue. If possible, try to shoot both guns before you buy (I know, that may not always be practical). Also, I wouldn't let resale value be a major factor in a gun purchase. If the gun turns out not to be quite what you had hoped for, I can almost guarantee that you're not going to be happy with the price you get when you sell it regardless of what brand it is. And if it performs well for you and you enjoy shooting it, who cares what its' resale value is!
 

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I say Beretta

Also, don't just limit yourself to the whitewing. For the price of a new whitewing or red label you can find some awesome deals on used higher grade sporting models. I found a great deal on a used 686 sporting. Got it for less than a new red label and I love it. I've put close to 1500 rounds through it in the last 4 months and it's doing fine. Plus, most of the time you can shoot a used gun before you buy and see how you like it.

Just a thought :lol:
 

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I admit to being a Beretta fan, but like TrapFreak says...try to shoot them both and make your decision. Cletus makes a great point that you shouldn't limit your Beretta choices to the Whitewing only. Look at the sporting models as well. I have an Onyx Sporting and a 687 Sporting and love them both. The Sporting models have wider ribs, manual safeties, and weigh a touch more to help absorb recoil.

Beretta "Y" guns are a good way to stretch your buying dollar. A "Y" gun is like a "demonstrator" on a car lot. They have been handled and looked at, some have been shot, and others haven't; but they are cheaper... Since they are made to be looked at by dealers and ranges, seems like the wood looks a tad better on them for some mysterious reason (that tid-bit is never officially acknowleged)

Whittaker's has a lot of these "Y" guns if you want to try them... http://www.whittakerguns.com/

Good luck,

Rawhyde
 
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