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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning on rebluing an old Model 12 I have, and I'm wanting to do it the same way it was done from the factory. I already know I need to make a humidity box, and I've already went to a welding shop and having a boiling tank made but I was wondering if there was any little tricks that you guys do that can make things easier along the way.

I'm going to use the rust bluing solution called Belgium Blue, but I don't really know, what do you guys suggest? I think I've got most of it put together but like I said I'd like to have your guys input on this, especially since this is my first time trying this.

I'll be in WV for a couple weeks bowhunting, but whenever I get back I plan on getting everything together. Any helpful hints are appreciated.

Matt
 

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If I can assume you are using Brownells blueing system, be sure to get their degreaser to boil the gun in and be sure your steel wool is absolutly oil free. They have some good instructions that need to be followed exactly. It isn't really all that hard, just follow what they say and the job will turn out great, I know from experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply ruger4570, I didn't know I needed a degreaser to boil it in. All I thought I needed was distilled water that had all the impurities removed. Thanks for the tip, I'll check that out. Also, someone said to dip the steel wool in acetone to remove the oil that keeps it from rusting, do you know anything about this? I'll go to brownells and check out the degreaser your talking about. Oh and I'm not planning on using the bluing system brownells offers, but if it looks better I'll check it out, I've got a couple barrels and a complete model 12 to do.

Matt
 

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This isn't meant to be condescending -
The first gunsmithing technique you'll need to manage is polishing. It's a craft unto itself. No of dishing screw holes or rounding off corners, no creating flat spots on the round parts and keeping the flat parts flat is the result of good polishing.
 

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You'll need two tanks. It's a very labor intensive effort. I never use a wheel for polishing--everything is done by hand. Try to find stainless steel wool and you won't have to go to the trouble of burning the oil out of regular wool. Make your barrel plugs before you start and be certain they fit. Get some stove wire to suspend your barrel in the boiling degreaser and clean water in the second tank. A small mesh wire tray is handy for small parts. My guns have all come out good but it's a lot of work. Some of the Winchester barrels will take many passes (applications) before they reach the desired color. I use Pilkington's rust blue and have had good results. Have an extra gas tank on hand so you can switch them out quickly. I never used a humidity box, since everything rusts quite readily here in East Texas. Good luck.
 

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The Pilkington's solution is good stuff, but for a beginner I recommend Laurel Mountain Forge barrel brown and degreaser....it's base is ferric chloride and it has a detergent included that makes handling of parts a bit easier....I always use a humidity box, but you might not need one...never mind using steel wool...a carding brush on a drill press will do the job much better and quicker....some years ago I did an article for American Gunsmith on this subject....if you'd like a copy (in pdf), just send me your email address and I'll forward it....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies so far guys. I was only thinking I needed one tank, because all you needed to do to clean the barrel after sanding is getting a clean rag and rubbing acetone over it. I don't know though. Also, I've been looking at the buffing wheels for a bench grinder. It seems like it would be much easier to work, and also give me both hands to have on the material to keep thing more precise.

Also Mike, I was wondering what a carding brush is. I've never heard of such a tool, can you give me an explanation?

Matt
 

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if there's not enough humidity in your area it can be hung in a closed bathroom , run the shower till the mirror gets foggy. I also like Laural Mountain - don't have to worry about degreasing so much. When you put it on make sure it's with one pass , NOT overlapping the solution. Use a rag big enough to cover around the whole barrel as you drag it accross in one motion. Boil it on the last treatment [ as the instructios say ] to get a black instead of brown color . As said, the metal prep is where the work is. Paul
 

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Keep your guns away from the dreaded buffing wheels. They ruin what they touch...

Read Tom's description on doing Damascus barrels. (link below) It's more demanding than just rust but some of the same techniques will come in handy. Tom is an exec, not a gunsmith...he does this as a hobby and is right up there with some of the best work I've ever seen.

http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery.fcg ... d=17977891

Jeff
 
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