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I use a 28 ga and a 20 for upland and have not touched a 12 ga for upland in years. It is all about learning the guns limitations and yours and staying within that. Don't get caught up in the bigger is better mindset it is just simply not true. If you like the 20 and shoot it well go for it. I also use reloaded #6 shot going at 1250 fps in a 3/4 ounce for the 28 and a 7/8 in the 20. I have already taken 10 birds this year so something is working right.

Here is opening day all birds were shot with either the 20 or the 28. I used my 28 ga Franchi al-48 or 20 ga Benelli M2. Partner used his M1 20 ga or his Bereta Silver Pigeon 20 ga.

 

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My buddies and I took 9 birds today I shot both 12 and 20.
My first 2 roosters were stone dead before they hit the ground but my buddy's - well they ran around a bit and the dog had fun with them!
He said it was because I was shooting a 12 and he was shooting a 20 so we swapped.
My next rooster never knew what hit it. My buddy's rooster… eh lets say I had to help him out a bit.
I fired 4 rounds and had 3.5 birds a good day for me.
You hit the nail on the head there Bob. DOn't blame the gun it's usually from focusing on that long tail and shooting them in the butt.
 

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I have made a decision this small game season to hunt exclusivly with a 20 gauge. I'm having a pretty good season so far with a couple of birds and rabbits and a bunch of squirrels. I have (2) 20. Wingmasters I've owned for years (fixed full & fixed modified).
I think you misread his post he is not a beginner and has obviously been shooting these 20 ga guns for years. He just never used them for Pheasants. His question was do people think he can be sucessful with the 20 and the answer is yes you can.
 

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The ones that whine and obsess the most about "heavy" guns would be better served giving equal attention to the massive girth that hangs over their belts. Hard to feel sorry for sweating slobs and 8 lb. guns when 20, 30, 40 or more pounds of excess blubber is hanging off their bodies because they put it there.
Hey Randy thats hitting a little below the belt! :lol:

I love light guns and yes I have that extra blubber but it's for warmth. :p

3/4 oz. of #6 shot is about 166 - 168 pellets. 1-1/4 oz. of #4 shot is also 166-168 pellets.

This stuff isn't all that tough. A 3/4 oz. 28 gauge load of #6 shot can produce just as many holes as a 1-1/4 oz. 12 ga. load of #4 shot.

Savvy 28 gauge shooters understand this well, and exploit it. I can tell you who cripples more birds, the 28 ga. guy who takes most of his birds at 30 yards (or less) vs. the "12 ga. guy" that thinks he can stretch shots past 55 yards for the "legendary" late season pheasants by virtue of his "better" 12 ga., 1-1/4 oz. load, and "late season pellets."

The 28 gauge hunter wins in the clean kill department every time. It should be obvious why that is.
WHat an excellent way to put it. I watch more guys wound birds regardless of gauge because they don't know their limitations or their guns. Most becasue they look at that long tail and shoot the bird in the ***.
 

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I have been using my 20 ga with a mod choke and a 7/8 #6 first shot and second is same or is a 1 ounce #5 same for third shot.
 
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