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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just picked up trap shooting after a long...long layoff. I shoot a Remington 1100 field gun, 28" non-vented barrel, mod. choke (I average about 21 out of 25/round), but would like to buy an O/U gun that does not lock me into just trap, as skeet and sporting clays look like a lot of fun. I like the look, reputation, and recommendation of the Browning Citori model(Cynergy looks nice, too). From what I have gathered...through this incredible forum...and my shooting buddies, that the flexibility I am looking for is provided through choke selection, which most models have, barrel length, and the adjustable comb. Given that criteria, the Citori XS Special, 525 Sporting, XT Trap, and Cynergy Sporting all look like viable choices. I would appreciate any advice, tips, etc. that any of you knowledgeable practitioners can provide. :)
 

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The problem that you will run into is that most advanced trap shooters prefer a gun that shoots significantly higher than where the shooter looks. Sporting clays and skeet shooters prefer a gun that normally shoots flat or in the case of skeet slightly high.

I shoot primarily skeet and sporting clays. I prefer a flat shooting gun. For years I shot a Browning 425 with 30" barrels. It shot very well for skeet and sporting, and even got my my first 25 straight in trap. But in trap you have to cover the bird with the barrel, which is not always optimal in trap.

I now shoot a Beretta 682, which also shoots flat. That gun works about the same as the 425 for trap.

Since I'm not shooting much trap, I would rather have a gun that excels at skeet and sporting clays and does "OK" for trap than one that's great for trap but "OK" or "poor" for skeet and sporting.

My choices for all-rounders would be "sporting clays" models in the Beretta 686/687/682 series, Browning Citori/525/XS, Rizzini Premier, or Guerini Summit.

One other suggestion would be to look at a Beretta Parallel Target 391. It's an auto rather than an O/U, but it's a very good "one gun" solution. It shoots slightly high, which may compromise nicely for all clay target games.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:D Thanks! This certainly confirms what I have been told. I was under the impression that the adjustable comb would allow me to change the "target picture" between trap and skeet. That is to say, setting the comb a little higher would allow me to aim lower; thereby seeing the target above the sights for trap and setting the comb lower would allow me to shoot flatter (covering the target) for skeet. Opinions, please?

This web site and these forums are awesome! :D :D
 

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That's the same thought that I have heard from a lot of people. Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way for most of them.

A trap gun normally shoots high when you're looking right down the rib. If you just raise the comb on a flat-shooting gun to make it shoot more like a trap gun, you will be seeing a whole lot of rib. If you're used to it, no problem. But if you're going back and forth, it's going to be disconcerting.

Secondly, that's a whole lot of messing around with the comb every time you want to shoot a different game. Let's say you're going to shoot a "club championship" - a couple of rounds of trap, some skeet, some sporting or 5-stand. Maybe you shoot skeet first, then trap, then sporting. So you'll have to adjust the comb going from skeet to trap, then adjust it back. How are you sure you got the comb in the right place? If you miss, are you going to have doubts and start getting out the allen wrenches to mess with the comb again? Most adjustable comb hardware that comes on factory guns isn't designed to be adjusted over and over and over again. Some of it can slip over time.

I dunno. If you're primary game is trap I think it's harder to have a "do-all" gun, unless you like a flat-shooting gun, or are willing to put up with swapping barrels and stocks (some guys do this with Perazzis, Krieghoffs, or Berettas). If you're primary game is skeet or sporting, I think it's easier to have a "do-all" gun.

All just my opinion though. Others will certainly differ. If I were doing mostly trap with some skeet or sporting, I'd probably get a 682 trap combo (available used for about $1600) and send it to Rich Cole for a set of 30 or 32" sporting barrels and a sporting stock. The barrels should run about $1000, the stock somewhere between $150 and $900. You'd have a "do-all" gun that had no compromises for under $3000. Add subgauge tubes and you'd be set for any clay target game you ever wanted to shoot.
 

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I have both an XS Special and Cynergy Sporting. In my opinion the XS fits much better with a fatter stock at the shoulder and a right palm swell. However, it also feels much heavier than the Cynergy.

Also, both these guns come with ported barrels. If you have never fired or been around someone firing a ported gun, I would recommend testing one first. They are considerably louder and hearing protection is NOT optional. The Cynergy also has less recoil then the XS but, the fit issue still comes into play to me. If I were you, I would fit each one to your shoulder and see which feels best to you.

The XS and most other Citori's have about the same feel (to me) except for weight. The Cynergy is considerably narrower and lighter. If I were to do it over again, I wouldn't have bought a Cynergy just because they are so much higher than the XS and other sporting models in the Browning lineup.

If you have the means, get you one of each and sell the one you don't like, or just keep em both, like I did. What ever you choose you can't go wrong with a Browning or Berretta!!

Hope this helps!

Jolly
 

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Very good advise so far. Remember that there is a considerable difference in the Citori, Cnergy, 525 or the Beretta's. You will be better served to take your time and try as many as possible. You will be suprised at how much different each of these guns feel. The Browning 525 feels much nose heavier than the others to me. I find the Cnergy and Beretta 682 to have somewhat similiar characteristic's, I have no experience with the XS Brownings but would also suggest you looking at the Beretta 391 if an autoloader is something you might consider.

RTA48
Beretta 682 gold E, 30" for all games
 

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I second the advice to try as many as possible.

For SC's, I want a gun w/ at least 30" barrels, and overbored to .735, at least.

I want screw in chokes and don't need porting.Those are very broad parameters....barrels go from 28-34 " and factory bores go from .722-.750.There's plenty to choose from.....but how you shoot a gun is personal to you....so sample as many as you can.
 
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