Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Speaking of rule book nazis here is a proposal for your consideration and comment:

On page 38 of this year's rule book you will find under Safety Precautions, G9., the rule prohibiting the use of any gun that will accept to shoot 2 different gauges of shells.

Since it is under safety precautions supposedly it is the cure for a safety issue. You can posit that this blanket rule covers all shell size hijinx and is therefore the most completely safe and effective way to combat the spectre of exploded guns and spraying shrapnel. Yet by extension of that logic the safest of all skeet would be air skeet where only empties are loaded, the shooter makes the bang sound and pretends the gun goes off. So how far is too safe?

I say NO 28 shell will stay in any 12 gauge chambered gun: They slide thru all the time. Each and every brand each and every time. They slide thru. Even thru my super full Rhino turkey choke. I just tested it. I say no chamber neck stops them. If you have contravening data so state by post.

To my mind, a reasonable way to shoot the doubles event (and ONLY the doubles event) would be to shoot 28 for the first target then the 12 for the second target to reap the benefits of maximum pellets chasing the second target and for the longer shots. The 28 would maximize the recoil drawbacks vs shot pattern effectiveness ratio for the first shot yet allow you max "wack" -to recoin a popular word - where the fruits of same would benefit the most in the second tube.

Ball in Your Court.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
You make a good argument for a lighter load for the first shot but why not just shoot a 3/4 oz 12 ga load in the first barrel?

I don't see any reason to change the rule.

Kensington
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,305 Posts
Yep. No reason to change the rule. There is nothing to prevent you from shooting more or less BBs in either barrel, mixing velocities, changing powders or changing shot size--all of which can arguably be put to strategic use in the shooting of doubles. And I know of a couple of shooters who do. For example, 1 oz everywhere but second shots on 3-4-5. 9s everywhere but 8s second shot on 3-4-5. Or do as Kensington says and load up some 3/4 12s for your first shots if you feel the need. Nothing in the rules prohibits it.

I see absolutely no reason to affect any change whatsoever in the rule. In fact, I think it's a good safety rule. It may not bear much on those who have been shooting a long time and have excellent safety practices, but that does not include everyone who shoots skeet and the rules need to be written to protect the lowest common denominator.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are rule changes made only when there is some necessity?

Are rule changes justifiable for motives other than pure need?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,237 Posts
That rule came from the early 80's. Tube-sets were just then establishing themselves as the primary equipment choice.

Then, as now, the unresolved equipment question was what to do in the 12 gauge. Robert Paxton had started to use in 20 in the 12 gauge events, but the jury was still out on how that would work. Others were trying other solutions.

Some liked the idea of staying with their o/u, but weren't yet ready to follow Paxton's lead, so they inserted just one 20 gauge tube. The though was that the single tube would add weight and help maintain the balance and swing of a tubed o/u. The shooter would single load the 12 gauge barrel for most of his shots, and the 20 gauge would only be used for the four second shots on doubles.

This offered the opportunity for a shell of the wrong gauge to be dropped in the 12 gauge barrel, etc, etc, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,643 Posts
Ain't nothing like a 20 ga, dropped in the 12 ga tube...with a 12 ga behind it because...well, the chamber looked empty.

Its a decent rule, I have not problem with it.

"Edited in an attempt to refind my recently lost graciousness LOL"
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,237 Posts
mike modelle said:
I say NO 28 shell will stay in any 12 gauge chambered gun: They slide thru all the time. Each and every brand each and every time.
That is true, and some say that is the reason the traditional shooting order for a 4-gun shoot paired the .410 and the 20 gauge on one day, and the 12 and 28 on another. The .410 would not stick in the 20 gauge barrel, nor the 28 in a 12 gauge.

I remember when the 20 gauge went to yellow hulls. Imagine how easy it was to confuse a 28 gauge shell with a 20 gauge when they were the same color.

Orange and Purple.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Tom you know so much. You add a marvelous texture, a dimension of experience that no one else seems to want to share. That idea makes good sense to me..

One of the secondary but significant reasons you will not find a 12 gauge shell on my person or on my property nor my gun untubed at any time is precisely the danger posed by the 20 in a 12 bore. It will slide in and lodge and you cant see it...and wammo.

A 3/4 or 7/8 OZ 12G load in the big gun would work fine as the first shot and short-circuit the safety issue.

The two advantages of a 28 tube for the first shot over a reduced load 12 for the first shot in doubles is the extra weight of the tube vice no tube and of course the need to adjust machines for the 12 if you reload two kinds of shells.

Relative to safety..even today there is nothing but shooter care that breaks the chain of events needed to cause something ugly thru a shooter slipping something down a tube he should not. In that regard, I do not see on the face of it why a shooter could not be allowed the 28 in the doubles event based on any salient issue of safety.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top