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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been shooting high recently. I *think* that i am peeking....not getting my face down on the stock and looking down the barrell. Would this cause a high shot?Also believe this is a result of ruffed grouse hunting and taking quick shots before I've settled into position.Would peeking cause a high shot? Any recommendations on corrections, other than getting into position before shooting?
 

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Yes, looking up over the barrel can cause high, behind, and just plain missing shots. You have to self consciously force yourself to keep your cheek on the stock.
 

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Another general rule of thumb I have followed goes like this:Buttstock too long: Low shotsButtstock too high: High shotsIf this is a recent developement, I agree that it is an issue of form, or some changes you have made to your clothing or something. If you have a comfortable trap stock that performs well with a light shirt and shooting vest, it probably will be too long when shooting with a heavy sweater and jacket or parka. Mike RossLife Member, NAHCMember, National Rifle AssociationMember, Meeker Co. Historical Society
 

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Sometimes recoil migh be a factor. Make sure the gun fits you and you have a firm grip on the forend. Its not how well you shoot , its how much noise your gun makes
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I *think* I have resolved this issue, and attribute the high shots to improper form...not getting my face/cheek down on the sighting plane. And, I do believe the quick shots required for ruffed grouse hunting were the reason for the poor form.
 

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grouse are hard to hit anyway. you end up doing a lot of snap shooting and it takes a large amount of skill and a little luck. keep hunting.
 

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Form is something that starts as a conscience effort and then becomes second nature. Simply practicing mounting the gun properly will develop the muscle memory that will allow those snap shots to become more natural. Try mounting the gun and think of the steps and contact points, then repeat in a normal manner and see how many reps it takes to feel slight fatigue, you might be surprised at how fast it comes.
 

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I had to teach a buddy a way out of a similar bad habit, and his too was caused by upland shooting. He would tend to start aiming before he shouldered the gun, pushing the muzzle out and up. I told him to swing the butt in and aiming with his whole upper body as a "turret" as opposed to pointing just the gun.
 
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