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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious:

I keep seeing recommendations to go to 1oz loads for those who have an issue with recoil. Why is it that no one recommends going to a lighter powder charge, like 2-1/2 drams, instead of lighter shot weights? Is it not as dramatic a difference, or just harder to get shells with light charges? (Winchester AA does have a "low recoil/low noise" round with 2-1/2 drams, but it also has slightly less than 1oz of shot, too.)

Thanks,

-- Sam
 

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The change in recoil is caused by the difference in inertia generated by the lighter shot weight. The heavier the shot weight the more the gun is going to try and recoil in the opposite direction from the line of travel due to the increased gas pressure resulting from the detonation of the powder. Reducing the powder charge will also affect the amount of recoil, but not as significantly as reducing the weight of the shot charge. Also the reduction of powder charge will also result in lower velocity for the shot charge. Hope this helps---AFG
 

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More fps means more Eq. Drams that is more recoil, same with lead weight.
There are some hunters that say that you don't feel the diference,
But actually you do notice the diference in the recoil when you shot 300 rounds.
 

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whenever u change loads u always wanna keep the velocity in the same area. If not u will mess up your lead.
 

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SamL

I recommend people use 1 oz loads but NOT for recoil.

I lived in Europe at the time they made the switch to 28 grams as they call one ounce. The purpose of the change was to reduce the number of people in the (International Bunker) shoot offs -IT HAD THE OPPOSITE EFFECT. :cry:

Scores went up.

I do not consiously feel recoil but I use 1oz, in a heavy gun. It reduces muzzle flip, recoil and fatigue - all make it easier to score higher.

Roger
 
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As was stated above, reducing the weight of the shot will reduce the felt recoil in a given velocity. Less energy is required to accelerate the shot to the desired fps.

There is a price to pay, however. Reduce the velocity very much and determining the forward lead becomes even more difficult.

There are also fewer shot pellets to cover a particular area, a 30" circle, for example. Extend the range with light loads and the pattern may get too sparce to give consistent "kills."

A much better way of reducing felt recoil is to change the stock dimensions to make the gun better fit the shooter. The dimensions that most commonly cause unacceptable recoil are pitch, drop at the comb, and drop at the heel. When the dimensions do not fit the size and shape of the shooter. Along with other difficulties, felt recoil is often a problem.

Recoil is caused by the energy of the load (the acceleration of a given shot weight to a particular velocity) and the resistence of the gun's moving to the rear (the weight of the gun.)

Three dram loads (a meaure of velocity, not powder weight - it was initally used to describe the weight of a black powder charge necessary to get the shot to a given velocity.) do not bother people who are not overly sensitive to recoil. The gun must fit however.

Shoot Well,
Rollin
http://stockfitting.virtualave.net
 
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