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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any of you out there had to outfit a 10-year-old-daughter? So far, even the youth models have too long a trigger pull for her and she can't hold them properly. Are there any other options other than having a gunsmith chop down the stock, which, of course, I'll have to replace once she gets tall enough to handle the regular youth model.
 

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Yikes. Could this be more perfect? On Gubroker (auction site) there is a Stevens 94, 20 ***** single shot, 26 inch barrel with a 12.5 inch LOP. The number for this item (just type in the search box) is 10908043. Currently asking $50, with six days left on the auction. I also like that the pix seems to indicate not a sharp pitch on the butt stock...can't really tell from pix though.
 

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CrusherT said:
Any of you out there had to outfit a 10-year-old-daughter? So far, even the youth models have too long a trigger pull for her and she can't hold them properly. Are there any other options other than having a gunsmith chop down the stock, which, of course, I'll have to replace once she gets tall enough to handle the regular youth model.
My choice is the Stoeger uplander in 28 gauge I would then cut the stock to the proper L.O.P. My grandaughter handles this well and replacing the stock isn't that big of an expense.
Mike
 

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If you go that route, which sounds OK, you may wanna have a gunsmith add weight wherever you can. A 20 gauge can be vicious with recoil, because they're often so light!

Because you want your daughter to enjoy shooting, I'd actually opt for a lighter gauge and maybe an autoloader. Like a Remington 1100 youth model, in 28 gauge. You could have it cut down for her, and then add a Graco adjustable recoil pad put on it. Then, as she grows you can lengthen it yourself.

On second thought, don't buy her a 20 gauge. In order for the recoil to be "pleasant" you'd have to make the gun too heavy for her to swing easily. A youth model 1100 28 gauge sounds perfect. It'll be light enough for her to manage on her own. If the cost is prohibitive, then look for a pump or break action single barrel in 28. A 410 has nice recoil, but it can be frustrating to learn to shoot with the sparse shot string that they throw.

If you go a 28 gauge, the shells are pricey to buy new but cheap to reload. And it will be worth it in the long run, when she actually enjoys shooting with you.
 

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I would vote with Dale on the 28ga--even the Rem 1100. The 1100 semi-auto will make the 28 recoil feel like nothing. A single shot 20ga may be painfull if she is petite.

How much does your daughter weigh? How tall is she?

That info may help give better suggestons.
 

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I just ordered the EAA/Baikal sxs .410. I know that my daughter will have some work cut out for her but we'll spend a couple of bazillion straight away clays and I bet she'll be alright.

Here is the link
http://www.eaacorp.com/firearms/longgun ... h43t.shtml

it's sku# 180037
LOP 11.5" 39.8" overall length 6.4lbs

By the way for all that know me, this is by no means an endorsement for Baikal shotguns.
 
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Remington 1100 lt-20 with 3/4 oz. loads. The 3/4 oz. loads are available and a lot cheaper than 28 ga. The 7/8 oz. Remington All Purpose loads available at Dick's Sporting goods in boxes of twenty have a load combination that was easy on my kid and patterned better than STS or AA in his lt-20.
Look on ebay for a stock that is already cut or just bit the bullet and cut. I had to cut my son's down to the stock bolt. Put on a kick-eez pad. I would not even look at a single shot because the cheaper ones kick like mules and the auto displaces felt recoil. A .410 is only good for a kid to shoot at stationsry objects but is better left to the seasoned gun for moving targets.
Get her hooked on the shooting sports!
Good luck!
 

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I keep hearing that .410's are hard for kids to hit targets with, but if you were to take a poll out here on "what was your first shotgun" about 80% would be 410's. It's not that damn complicated to hit home thrown clays with a 410.

My 18 yr old daughter and 14 yr old daughter have both learned on 410's. My 7 yr old daughter is getting the benefit of her older sisters getting a sxs but she'll learn on the 410 too. The two older one's are great shot's now and I'm certain that the little one will also be.
 

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Crusher,

You don't mention if your daughter has ever shot before. I really screwed up with my 11 year old. I took her and my wife shooting using my skeet launcher. I let them both shoot my 28ga. Wifey had no problem but my daughter hated the kick and now won't shoot a shotgun, not even a 410.

What I should have done was started her out with a .22 rimfire. I backed up and let her shoot a BB gun and grimaced watching her flinch from it. Since then I let her shoot a .17HRM and she seemed OK with it but she can't get used to the scope. I now need to take her to a range and let her have some fun with a .22 before I can get her back to trying the shotgun. This all boggles my mind since my daughter is a physical animal who could probably give my wife an old fashion butt kicking. She's been playing soccer since she was 5 and is really strong. Yet she doesn't like the kick. She is so wound up about it she wouldn't even dry fire my friends 410!
 

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All good points made above, here are a couple more to consider. Make sure that you get her fitted as the above people have said, then have her eye dominanace checked and have someone make sure that her stance and mount are correct. Stance and mount can have as much effect on perceived recoil as fit.

Oh btw, ask the guy who cuts the gun to give you the piece back - with care/skill it can be re-glued back on again and you will not have to buy a new stock.

BTW how heavy is your daughter? I do not like to start anyone until they are in the 75-80 lb range. Started my two daughters around that weight, one younger than the other.

Great to hear of another youngster starting. BTW the youngest student I have ever had was 7 - he came to one of the free clinics we run every other month and he shot the .410 WELL. I had to kneel down behind him to see where he was shooting :lol:

Roger
 

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Roger--your additional points are well taken and are of good value.

A 7 year old with a shotgun! Amazing! I would have never believed it. Mine started at 12 and 14--but only with my knee to knee behind them in trap shooting.

I had thought about questioning the maturity of Crusher's 10 year old, but decided against it. Now I'm glad I did.

I guess I am the nervous type. A shotgun is very unforgiving.
 

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Okay i'm kinda slow on this thread, but do not get her a 28 ga or a 410. Get a 20 ga. Story time: Okay i know this girl and she's a pretty "big" girl for her age. Her dad automatically went out and bought her a 20ga 391. In about 6 months she wanted a 12 ga so now she shoots his 391. She is older than 10 though.

Just get your daughter an 1100 light 20 ga and put a good reciol pad on it. Try a trapdude gooey pad they come in all colors so you could get the color she wanted. www.trapdude.com And you may have to get a youth stock for it though.
 
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I agree. We just bought our eleven year old a 391, and she likes it a lot. She says it's light, and doesn't complain about recoil. Also, she's very good about cleaning it, and I can use it for skeet! I like this forum; it's nice to see the issues other women bring up.
 

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Well "guest" welcome to the forum and i hope you register sometime and you can post pretty much anything you want in the women's forum. And we'll try to answer your questions, or discuss something that needs to be discussed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I see they've moved my original post :)

My daughter is 10, about 100 lbs. and a little tall for her age. She likes shooting my .22 rifle, but didn't care much for the 20g auto at the Ducks Unlimited festival back in May. Of couse, it had no recoil pad and all she had on was a t-shirt to "cushion" the recoil. Not much of a cushion. To top things off, she's cross-eye dominant - she's right-handed and shoots left. Makes for a really nice combination of things to try and get her fitted right.

I would lean toward a 20g 870 with a nice recoil pad (trapdude.com). Maybe if I can find a used auto at a gun show or in the paper, I'll go for that.

Thanks for all the info.
 

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I thought a 10 year old might like a colored pad :wink:. I'm sure that if you look you can find a good 1100 for like $300 and that will last her for a pretty good while (3 years or so) or until she takes your gun away :D . But if you do end up with a gooey pad make sure that when you put it in your safe or whatever set it barrel down so that its not setting on the pad, because they will flatten out if you set the pad down and leave it down for a while, but not like when their settin the gun rack or anything just prolonged amounts of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, I bought a 20g 870 youth model for my daughter along with a Past recoil shield for her to wear. Although I would have liked to, I just didn't have the money to purchase an 1100 youth model (may do that in the future).

Took her dove hunting yesterday (Labor Day) and she took a couple of shots and had fun with her Dad. That's what counts!!! :D
 

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I'm a firm believer in a single shot for any beginning shooter.Concentration is then on only the task at hand,and making it count. I gave a lot of thought to the idea that a .410 is hard to hit with. I then weighed that with the cost of 28ga. shells,and the recoil on a 20ga. For what it's worth,my 11yr. old daughter will now learn on a British made,.410,single shot,"poachers gun".It probably weighs 4lbs,has a wrist small enough for small hands,an automatic safety,and shoots only 2 1/2" shells.I've had the stock cut back to 12.5".Yes, it'll be a little harder to hit with than a 28ga.,but so was the 22mag/.410 o/u that I learned with,and I didn't suffer any long term mental distress over it. :)
Jim
 

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Just did this drill with my 9 year old daugther--the solution was a Mossberg 500 Youth and a set of Trulock Choke tubes. The deciding combination was the short LOP and the fact that the forearm is set back further on the gun than the 870, so she can work the action.

I'd have preferred an 1100 Remington Youth, too heavy for existing upper body strength, or an 870, too long a reach and LOP. Beretta's light 20's are great, but expensive. Mossberg it is. The only feature I do not like is that there is no access to the magazine tube for cleaning.

Here is a URL to some pictures.

http://www.doublerhuntingclub.com/index.htm

There are only two girls in the montauge, but that is 100% more than last week. There are some very small kids here who all look like they are having a great time.

L
 

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I started out with a .410 and already haave one for my daughter. She is not yet three, so I guess I have to wait... I took it out to the skeet range and shot 20/25 so I know it must pattern well enough on the skeet field.
 
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