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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a Beretta A300, older model my late son used for trap shooting. With his passing, this will be my primary shotgun for all things. One issue I have is the sight picture. I usually put a center bead on the rib of most shotguns and they either line up or the front bead sits right over the center bead. My line of sight with his shotgun is I feel like my head is riding high and the center bead is far below the front bead. Seems like the way the buttstock is, the comb is high. So, instead of having a straight line of sight down the rib, the rear of the rib is low and looks like it is going uphill to the front bead, if that makes sense. I haven't patterned is to see how it shoots for me, and I am sure that should be my first step. Thinking I need to have the comb shaved down. Looking at other A300s, it seems the comb slants down, but the one on mine is straight. Picture attached of shotgun and how the beads line up. Left is what I am used to and right is what I see on my son's shotgun.

Anyone run across this or have any thoughts?
 

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@USAF Retired: There's no great mystery here.
The gun in question simply has a stock whose comb height yields (for you) an eye position higher above the rib's surface than you're accustomed to seeing with other shotguns.
It would be ridiculous to think that every shotgun ever made comes equipped with a stock that fits you personally.
This is the reason shooters modify their stocks, or have adjustable devices installed, or get a custom-built stock, or as noweil said immediately above, is the reason why some shotgun models come equipped with a shim adjusting method.

Now, whether or not you really "need" to shave down the comb is a different question.
 

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If there is a shim, adjust the drop to better fit you and your sight picture
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@USAF Retired: There's no great mystery here.
The gun in question simply has a stock whose comb height yields (for you) an eye position higher above the rib's surface than you're accustomed to seeing with other shotguns.
It would be ridiculous to think that every shotgun ever made comes equipped with a stock that fits you personally.
This is the reason shooters modify their stocks, or have adjustable devices installed, or get a custom-built stock, or as noweil said immediately above, is the reason why some shotgun models come equipped with a shim adjusting method.

Now, whether or not you really "need" to shave down the comb is a different question.
Understood, have owned many shotguns. Just never had a sight picture this far off and wanting to know what the best method would be to modify it. Looking at the recoil pad, it seems like something has previously been done to the stock to modify it for the pad. Gunsmith noticed it as well.
 

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Beretta has shims that can be changed out. They fit between the receiver and stock and the bottom of the buttstock.
sometimes they have to trim the wood when the stock doesn’t fit you so they recommend that you have a quality gunsmith do it. Should be easy for a gunsmith.
I just bought a Beretta 390 and the buttstock is too high for me too. I’mgoing to have it fixed soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Beretta has shims that can be changed out. They fit between the receiver and stock and the bottom of the buttstock.
sometimes they have to trim the wood when the stock doesn’t fit you so they recommend that you have a quality gunsmith do it. Should be easy for a gunsmith.
I just bought a Beretta 390 and the buttstock is too high for me too. I’mgoing to have it fixed soon.
Thank you for the reply. Answer I was looking for.
 

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I think before you make any more investments in solutions you need to determine there is a problem - pattern it. Some guns (including some Berettas) have flat ribs (meaning the slope is parallel with the bore), in which case you may want to see your current sight picture.

If pattern testing reveals a point of impact you can't work with - yeah, if it has stock shims, that's the thing to try before permanently modifying the stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think before you make any more investments in solutions you need to determine there is a problem - pattern it. Some guns (including some Berettas) have flat ribs (meaning the slope is parallel with the bore), in which case you may want to see your current sight picture.

If pattern testing reveals a point of impact you can't work with - yeah, if it has stock shims, that's the thing to try before permanently modifying the stock.
I agree 100%. I will be doing that before I make any changes. Thank you.
 

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Not sure about the earlier 300, but the 303 Trap models did not have an interchanable shim at the rear of the stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Sold out here, but I would start looking.
As was messaged earlier, I need to find out if the model I have even has the shims. I think I saw a set for sale last night. Not very much. After I pattern it, I will need to have a chat with the gunsmith if it is off.
 

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Just look at the joint between the back of the receiver and the grip. Your picture shows a black plastic shim in there. The guns typically come with two shims that can be flipped for right or left cast as well as more or less drop in the stock. As a mate to the shims, there is a large metal oval washer in the stock under the head of the stock bolt that has to be oriented the same as stock the shim.

Typically the standard shim installed at the factory will be marked 55/60 for drop....which is drop at heel in mm (25.4 mm is an inch) so 2-3/16" or flipped is 2-3/8" drop.

My 391s and A400 also came with a second shim and stock washer that is 50/65 mm or 1-15/16" drop or 2-9/16" depending on orientation. Sounds like you will likely need the most drop (patterning will tell you this),. If so, install this shim with the 65mm text on the plastic shim and metal stock washer facing you during assembly. If shooting right handed, ensure the DX faces you....if left handed it would be SX facing you. If you don't have a 50/65 plastic shim and matching steel washer plate, Beretta sells them online.

There are videos on setting performing this switch online...Google will help you find them. The short written version....A Beretta stock bolt takes a 13mm socket, and you'll need a pretty long extension, or couple two or more extensions together to reach the bolt head after using a #2 Phillips screwdriver to take the recoil pad off. To aid in reassembly I usually stick a small piece of paper towel in the socket to hold the stock bolt head while inserting it into the steel washer. Just ensure your plastic shim and steel washer are oriented exactly the same or you risk cracking the wood at the grip.

Good luck with it, and pretty gun by the way!
 

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You don't really care if you don't go to a pattern board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just look at the joint between the back of the receiver and the grip. Your picture shows a black plastic shim in there. The guns typically come with two shims that can be flipped for right or left cast as well as more or less drop in the stock. As a mate to the shims, there is a large metal oval washer in the stock under the head of the stock bolt that has to be oriented the same as stock the shim.

Typically the standard shim installed at the factory will be marked 55/60 for drop....which is drop at heel in mm (25.4 mm is an inch) so 2-3/16" or flipped is 2-3/8" drop.

My 391s and A400 also came with a second shim and stock washer that is 50/65 mm or 1-15/16" drop or 2-9/16" depending on orientation. Sounds like you will likely need the most drop (patterning will tell you this),. If so, install this shim with the 65mm text on the plastic shim and metal stock washer facing you during assembly. If shooting right handed, ensure the DX faces you....if left handed it would be SX facing you. If you don't have a 50/65 plastic shim and matching steel washer plate, Beretta sells them online.

There are videos on setting performing this switch online...Google will help you find them. The short written version....A Beretta stock bolt takes a 13mm socket, and you'll need a pretty long extension, or couple two or more extensions together to reach the bolt head after using a #2 Phillips screwdriver to take the recoil pad off. To aid in reassembly I usually stick a small piece of paper towel in the socket to hold the stock bolt head while inserting it into the steel washer. Just ensure your plastic shim and steel washer are oriented exactly the same or you risk cracking the wood at the grip.

Good luck with it, and pretty gun by the way!
Great information. Thank you so much. I got the gun used years ago, so no extra shim with it.
 
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