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I live in AZ and am going White Tail hunting in Illinois in December where I plan to use my shot gun. I have only used shot guns on birds so this is a new experience for me. I have other O/O's but don't want to use them.Any advice? Rifled barrel? Accuracy of a rifled barrel to using a modified barrel? At a maximum of 100 yards -- what would I expect to see in the variance of a rifled barrel v modified barrel? Cost/Benefit? Slugs of [email protected]
 

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Unless you plan on keeping your shots under 50 yards I would go with the Slug Barrel . The real difference comes into play wih the slugs you can use accurately. If you use the modified bbl you'll be limitted to the old style rifled slug which gives marginal accuracy.If you go with the rifled slug bbl you can use the sabot slugs etc. and take full advantage of the accuracy of the combination, which depending on the ga. and load would be out to 125 yards.The mod bbl no matter what slug goes thru it will be hard pressed to stay on a paper plate much past 50 yards.Where in IL are you hunting? I live in the central part and was raised in the So. part.
 

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I've hunted with shotguns in Indiana over 30 years and I own 2 guns with the rifled barrells right now.My advice is to get a smooth bore slug barrell and keep your shots to 100 yards.The barrell is cheaper and you can use it to hunt small game the rest of the day when deer aren't moving.The ammo is cheaper, by half or more, and you can use the savings to learn what you and the gun are truely capable of.If you know what you're doing you don't need more than 2 shots in the gun, use the rest on the range. If it really bothers you to only have 2 then you haven't shot the gun enough.
 

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WOW, I get to disagree with the great MarlandS!!! I sighted in my favorite deer gun yeasterday. I ended up with a 2.5 inch group 1.5 inchs high and right of center at 100yd. I did it with a smoothbore 12ga pump and rem sluggers rifled slugs. I checked my drop at 125yd (about 4 inchs) and I have every confidence in the gun and myself. I can and will take a deer at 125yd if I need to. The 100 yd mark is not as solid as most hunters make it sound. Check yourself and your weapon to know your range, then hunt your range. Most shots I have are at 60 to 70 yards, that is well within my range. I saw a guy yesterday miss the 50yd targets all together (smoothbore 12ga rifled slugs) He grouped well on the 25yd targets. His range was 25 to 35 yards. That is still a possible shot in the north woods. Remember a hunter brags about how long a shot he made, a great hunter brags about how close his shot was.ps MarlandS: sorry to hear about that problem you have with keeping slugs on the paper at 100yds ;) ya know I joke because I care. (about what I have no idea) Let the dog hunt the birds, ... you hunt the dog.Edited by: GordonSetter at: 11/20/02 9:54:07 am
 

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No real disagreement here GS, know a guy that called a head shot at 150 yards +or - (Rifled barrel and sabots and shoots it a lot), I also know people that can't hit a 30 gallon drum at 30 yards because they only shoot it a couple of times one week before season.When advising people that I have no knowledge of their experience and capability, I hedge way hard on the safe side because I would prefer a dead animal instead of a jaw shot one or one running around on three legs.I don't think most people are honest with them selves about their range, I know I thought I was a great 400 yard coyote shot at one time, but now I know I'm a lot better 250 yard coyote shooter.In truth ,most shots in IL ,if they know what they are doing when placing their stand, are less than 20 yards.great , MarlandS, uhhh...yeah...
 

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Oh sure, I get to throw a disagreement out there and then you turn around and start making sense. I agree with everythng we both said. I encourage everyone to join a range and learn then imporve. A range isn't as bad as most newbies think. The two best ranges here cost $50 a year for a family of four or less and $35 a year but you need to be an NRA member. So for 50 to 70 bucks you can shoot as much ammo as you can aford. Look in your area and call around. I know when I first went into it I thought it would cost $100 a year per person. Glad I took the time to call. Let the dog hunt the birds, ... you hunt the dog.
 
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