Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a new Beretta Silver Pigeon I sporting. I really like the gun but the action has to be "slammed" shut before the top latch will move to lock the barrels to the breech. If I close the action "normally" the latch will not move. Is this typical for the way this gun works, or is this something I should have corrected while the gun is in warranty? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,869 Posts
This is normal. Working the action repeatedly will help. You will notice witness marks on the forearm lug on the bbl as it wears in. The worst thing you can do is to over lubricate this area, let it seat in metal to metal contact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,521 Posts
cbgraham said:
I recently purchased a new Beretta Silver Pigeon I sporting. I really like the gun but the action has to be "slammed" shut before the top latch will move to lock the barrels to the breech. If I close the action "normally" the latch will not move. Is this typical for the way this gun works, or is this something I should have corrected while the gun is in warranty? Thanks.
Rather than slamming the gun shut and hoping that it breaks in before it breaks something else, I strongly suggest that you remove the buttstock and soak the complete receiver by immersion in a good solvent like mineral spirits. It's quite possible that something is gunked up in there which is not unusual for a new O/U. After a thorough cleaning, oil the innards lightly with Breakfree CLP or similar and reassemble.

Even if that doesn't fix the problem, at least you've eliminated this as a potential source of the problem. BTW, I don't like slamming O/U's shut. Close them firmly, yes, but don't slam them. If slamming is required, something needs corrected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I opened and closed the gun over 200 times today (put a bandage on my thumb before doing this) and even after this, the top latch would stay open if I closed the action without slamming it. When I opened the action afterwards, the pin that protrudes through the breech face that the barrels push against to close the top latch would be flush with the breech face. I could then take my fingernail and push the pin in a little further (slightly past the breech face) and close the top latch that way, but it seems to me that the pin should not have to be pressed in that far to close the top latch. I am going to contact the company I bought the gun from tomorrow to see what they recommend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,337 Posts
The top lever release spigot is set wrong. It should release the lever fractionally before becoming flush with the standing breech face not fractionally after as yours is doing.

AFAIK there's no user adjustment for this so it will need attention from a smith.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,521 Posts
cbgraham said:
I opened and closed the gun over 200 times today (put a bandage on my thumb before doing this) and even after this, the top latch would stay open if I closed the action without slamming it. When I opened the action afterwards, the pin that protrudes through the breech face that the barrels push against to close the top latch would be flush with the breech face. I could then take my fingernail and push the pin in a little further (slightly past the breech face) and close the top latch that way, but it seems to me that the pin should not have to be pressed in that far to close the top latch. I am going to contact the company I bought the gun from tomorrow to see what they recommend.
Once again, I recommend a good cleaning of the insides of the gun. In case you didn't know, many or even most of the new guns have a fairly heavy coating of rust preventative on the insides when they are manufactured. This is because the mfr doesn't know how many months (or maybe years) the gun may sit in storage under less than ideal conditions. Since they don't want their new guns rusting, they coat them with a sticky rust preventative. And sometimes wood chips or metal shavings are left on the insides of new guns.

In some cases, this rust preventative can interfere with the proper operation of the gun. You're far better off to clean it yourself now than to box it up and ship it off for a problem that you could have fixed yourself. And if you are reluctant to clean it because you don't know how to take the buttstock off, it's time you learned how to do it if you're going to own and use the gun. I've heard and read of too many instances where someone shipped a gun back for some very minor problem and ended up with a gun that was damaged in shipment. Then they REALLY had headaches and a$$burn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for your observations and recommendations. While working the action and occasionally shouldering the gun, I also noticed the middle bead on the rib is installed crooked and is likely cross threaded (I can see two threads between the sight and the rib), so the barrel (at least) will need to go back for this repair. I did talk to Cole about the action and the bead. They told me they could take care of both issues under warranty. I do agree about cleaning the action as being a correct first step, vs. the risk of shipping the gun again and would do this myself if not for the barrels needing to go back for repair anyway.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top