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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would love to get into shotgun sports. Which should I start with, trap or skeet? Also, are there social differences between the 2? Is one more "friendly" than the other? Are the rhythms of each different? Thanks for your advice
 

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You're more likely to get help from skeet shooters. IMHO, skeet is definitely more social. When you're on a trap line, nary a word is spoken until the round is over. Trap people get in a rhythm and don't like to break it. In skeet, one person shoots a station, moves out, then another shoots, until everyone has shot that station. Trap is just bang-bang-bang....

Once you get the hang of it, skeet is easier, IMHO. The birds are on predetermined flight paths.
 

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If you owned your own range or could rent/lease a skeet field or trap field for your own personal use, then it wouln't make much difference. However, if you are going to be shooting on ranges with strangers, then skeet is by far the better learning environment. Non-tournament skeet is very casual with shooters asking and offering advice to each other. Trap shooters, OTOH, are as serious as a heart attack even if they do well to break 21 out of 25. If you even start to ask someone a question or violate the unwritten trapshooter's code, they will look at you like you let a loud beer belch in church. :evil: Besides, if you try trap first, you may get "trapped" into thinking you can't hit anything but a going away type target and fail to even try the much more fun game of sporting clays. :lol:
 

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Like everyone said, skeet is a little more casual and social. For example, if you're having trouble on one of the stations, they may encourage you to take some extra shots from that station during your turn, just for practice. People don't mind waiting patiently while you take a few extra birds... In fact, even the old-timers take extra shots when they're having trouble at a particular station :D

Also, only the shooter and the trapper need to be focused on the clays and each other. During someone else's turn it's fine to quietly talk to another person to get tips or advice, just as long as you're not being a total distraction to the shooter.
 

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Skeet is a much more social game when you are on the line. Trap shooters do their socializing before and after. It's pretty much all business when you are on the line. But, usually, trap shooters are very receptive to new shooters. And, only too happy to share their expertise - real or imagined. :lol:

Competitive trapshooting is my passion because I enjoy the intensity. But, I recommend starting a new shooter on skeet, 1. because it is slower paced and more social 2. because the concepts of swing, forward allowance and follow-through are so much more obvious to the new shooter in skeet.
 

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I prefer skeet also, but
Skeet can be very intimidating and dissaponiting to a first time shotgunner - epsecially one not used to Moving targets. With Skeet clays up to 90mph, multiple angles/directions/doubles (even when on report), plus moving to different stations. Its pretty easy for one to do one very poorly the first time around -and get dissapointed.

Trap IS easier, the shots are similar always going away from you, and move slower (only up to 45mph) - and lets one settle in and get used to the whole moving target thing - and get a better score. Simply DUSTIN more birds, more easily is more inviting(fun) for a beginner... ( simple positive reinforcement)

I'd have to say Trap first to get the feel for moving targets, then move on up to skeet.
 

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Skeet birds are nowhere near 90mph in American Skeet.

All the new shooter has to do is ask the trapper to pull singles. They do it all the time at my club. The trappers are also skeet shooters, and can offer advice to the new shooter as they are shooting. Something like this wouldn't be tolerated on a trap line.

You still have to move from station to station in trap. Five stations vs eight isn't a big difference.

Now if you could get on a trap field alone, and have them lock the trap to throw straight out birds, this would be better than a round of trap with other shooters. The trapper could walk with the shooter and explain what to do, and perhaps offer tips during the shooting.
 

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I started out with my own thrower, a friend and a public range. With my own thrower we could send the clays across our sights (skeet) or away from us (trap). I found that going at our own pace without the pressure of unknown/unwritten social rules was very helpful. We could put the clays where we needed the practice. After getting a bit of confidence we went to the club fields. At the club we professed our ignorance and asked for help. The other members took this into consideration and were very helpful.
 

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Hey idriv495,

You may also find that you don't need to make such a huge distinction about which one you start with.

More often than not, wherever you find a skeet field you'll also find a trap range. And some of the people shooting skeet one minute will be out there shooting trap the next.

Unless you have two local ranges that are exclusively skeet and exclusively trap, you'll probably find that you can switch between both and find friendly people willing to show you each.

In my case, switching off between skeet and trap is just walking over 100 feet :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My thanks to all for your responses. Looks like skeet gets the nod. Now, auto or o/u? My gut tells me that if I buy the auto, and love the sport, I'm going to wind up buying an o/u anyway. So, should I buy the more expensive o/u out of the shoot? Thanks again guys.
 

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You should buy the semi-auto.

Because you're right, you will end up buying an O/U. So in about six months you'll have two guns instead of just one :D

Weird logic, I know... But you might as well accept the fact that if you really get into the sport, your first gun is never your last! :wink:
 

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I would have to agree with the skeet decision. I shot my first round of "official" skeet and everyone was very helpful. I also bought my first shotgun and went with the semi-auto. It works fine and am told that the reduced recoil is significant, though I have not shot an O/U yet. I think the O/U would be an advantage in sporting, but for skeet a semi-auto seems to work just fine and Sander is right, if you enjoy the sport you have an excuse to buy a second gun. I'm already saving. :D
 

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Sander said:
Because you're right, you will end up buying an O/U. So in about six months you'll have two guns instead of just one :D
Weird logic, I know... But you might as well accept the fact that if you really get into the sport, your first gun is never your last! :wink:
Dude, almost excatley my path through shotguns, so far. I started about six months ago and I know own three shotguns. I started with skeet and shoot a little trap, I still suck at both.
I bought a pump first (870), then a semi (391) and just bought my first O/U (Onyx). I bought a 20ga though because I want it for my first hunting trip this fall.
In April of this year I had to have a kid from the range show me how to release the action on an 870, so you know I just started about six months ago, and I was very green.

I would recommend starting with skeet. Spend your first day shooting nothing but low 7 just to get the hang of it. Once you bust a few in a row you will be hooked.

My best round so far was a 21 I still average around 16 or 17 when I bother to keep track. I'll worry about score later, I am just trying to cultivate the basic skills first.
 

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Skeet!

I've only encountered a few grumpies at my local range and they are the ones who come down from the trap side. The die hard skeet shooters are a wealth of information and encourage a few extra shots from a station that's giving you trouble.

I haven't had the pleasure of sporting clays. Yet.
 

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Took my first skeet lesson yesterday. I had been doing trap for a few months while I learned how to shoot a shotgun. I wanted to give skeet a try, and I think I like it more!

Personally, I don't know much, but I'm not sure it really matters which one you start first as long as you're taught the basic fundamentals. So whichever you do first, get a lesson!
 
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