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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got the itch for a small bore shotgun (28 or 410). I'm trying to decide what to do. I want to shoot skeet and clays with the gun. (Would rather have another gun than a tube set.) Ideally, I would get a 28 / 410 set, but most that I've seen are pretty expensive. Although I'd prefer the gun to be on a 28ga frame, a light 20 (6lbs) would be fine. I want at least 28" barrels.

I've got about $2200 of guns I could trade (HK USC 45 and a guide gun tricked out) and I can put a little cash in the deal.

Should I just end up getting two guns? Should I start w/ a 28?

I could go with a Beretta 686S and then get the other ***** later.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,
QD
 

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I have a Browning 4 barrel set that I use and the 28 is my favorite *****. I love the .410 to but it is not forgiving at all. I have looked at the Rizzini lately, they have a 28/410 set on a 28 frame. Nice gun and looks to be of very good quality. I beleive the price is around $3400.00 but there are also some SIG Rizzini's out there for a lot less.
If I had to choose one gun, it would be the 28 and save my money for a .410 later. The Berreta is a fine gun too and you won't go wrong with one. Good luck on you quest
 

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quickdraw, You made it clear that you don't want tubes, and I won't try to change your mind other than to say that the added weight of a tubed O/U goes a long way toward encouraging a smooth, fluid swing. I can't emphasize enough how important that is, especially with the .410.

If you're only into shooting the game for casual recreation and fun, barrel sets, pump guns, and semi-autos are all fine and will serve you well. However, if you become serious about shooting the best scores possible and reaching your full potential, a tube set is probably in your future. :wink:
 

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The 28 gauge is a lot more fun to shoot than a .410, especially at sporting clays. It might be OK for skeet, but it is really frustrating to shoot SC with a .410, because so many of the targets just won't break, even when you think you are doing everything right.

I have a Beretta 686 20/28 ga 2-barrel set, with Briley .410 tubes that fit the 28 ga barrels. I love the set, but the 28 is my favorite of the 3 gauges.

A 28 ga frame might be nice, but I think you might find it too light to shoot well. I like the frame size of the 20/28 combo, even when I am shooting the 28 ga.

If I had it to do over again, I would not get full-length .410 tubes, I would get ChamberMate short tubes or something similar. They would be cheaper. I've read that the .410 Chambermates don't work as well in a 12 ga as the 20 and 28 do, because there is such a big difference between the 12 ga and .410 bores. Howeve, I suspect a .410 Chambermate in a 28 or 20 ga would work well.
 

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I have a 28 gauge Beretta 686 which is on a 20 gauge frame and have just purchased a set of .410 Chambermates, and I have to say that its the perfect set-up for me.

I definately would get the 28 gauge on the 20 ga frame though to help with your swing through. My gun has a much nicer feel to it than other 28 gauges I've held on the smaller frame.

The .410 Chambermates have worked flawlessly (so far) for skeet, and don't change the feel of the gun. I'm not willing to embarrass myself enough to try them at sporting clays.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, I guess I'll continue to wrestle with whether to turn my H&K USC 45 into a gun or tubes.

I shoot a Browning 425 12ga now. If I was looking at a gun on a 20ga frame, I might stick with a Browning.

Decisions, decisions.
 

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Hi Quickdraw,
I have one comment then one suggestion for you just to give some thought to.

Comment- I love my .410 on the skeet field, it is the most fun skeet gun I have. But I couldn't imagine using it on a fairly normal sporting clays course. I might as well just throw my shells on the ground, and not have to clean the gun!

Suggestion- Nothing against the 28 gauge, it is a great skeet gauge. But being the cheap S.O.B. that I am, I just load my 20 gauge shells down to 3/4 of an ounce. I don't need another reloader, 20 gauge hulls are cheaper to obtain that the 28 gauge hulls, and don't need a whole other set of reloading components. I get more use out of my 20 gauge gun, and can still load it for 7/8 ounce loads (standard 20 ga. fodder) if I feel like it. Being a recreational shooter I don't shoot registered skeet, so I don't NEED actual 28 gauge loads to meet standards.

Good luck on your endeavor, and Merry Holidays.
 
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