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mtnoyster said:
Do you need snap caps for an o/u?
Personally I'd say no, BUT the're nice to have when checking the functionality of firearm so you don't have to use live ammo.

"functionality"... Don't you just love it when you use big words? :lol:
 

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oyster, they usually work better with loaded shells. Its hard to hit anything with snapcaps. :lol:

Oh, do you mean for letting the tension off hammer springs. Do whatever makes you feel good about the gun.

I've got em an don't ever use them anymore.
 

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I have never used snap caps on anything, UNTIL I got my Beretta Silver Pigeon.

I bought the 'plastic' ones (I forget the brand). . . . they've split.
Brownell's has the nickel plated (brass) caps that are on the way here, now.

I figure it this way - - - it's cheap insurance. :)

Keith
 

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There have been cases of firing pins sticking when dry fired so you're probably better off with snap caps. However, there are many people who've never used them, and have never had any problems.

Personally I always use snap caps in my guns :)
 

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Zoom is also a good brand of snap caps. They're made of alumnum an lots cheaper than the brass ones. Less than $10.00 a pr.
 

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mtnoyster said:
Do you need snap caps for an o/u?
No - there have been cases where guns stored for maybe five decades were taken out and fired with no problems. I bought a set in my first year cos I was keen and meticulous. I have not used one for over 20 years and believe leaving the gun empty and cocked does no harm whatsoever.
 

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What about cutting down a couple of hulls and using them as snap caps. Is that just as good as the real thing? Is it harmful in any way?
 

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Slopoke, after the shell is fired an the primer dimpled in, there's nothing for the firing pin to hit the next time.

There is also the possibility that you might pick up 2 live shells thinking they were the snapcap shells. BAD NEWS.
 

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In that case, I need to buy two snap caps for my Browning 12 ga. and two for my Beretta 20 ga.

I understand that brass is best.

There are no gun shops where I live. I'd appreciate suggestions on which outfit to buy from. What's the going rate?
 

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After some looking, I found A-Zoom aluminum snap caps at The Sportsman Guide and ordered a pair of 12s and a pair of 20s for a total of $24.92 including shipping.

Now I'm looking for the best deal on flush (mobile-choke) style choke tubes for my Beretta 20. Ideas? Thanks.
 

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You can make snap caps!! Don't waste your money. Just take a spent shell and knock the primer out. Then take an eraser out of a pencil (preferably a new pencil) and push it into where the primer use to be. You may need to use a tiny bit of oil to get the eraser in. They work great!
 

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If you are gonna place something in your chamber for an extended period you also need to be wary of "galvanic corrosion." Galvanic corrosion tends to occur when dissimilar conducting materials are connected and exposed to an electrolyte. If you put two dissimilar metals (steel, brass, aluminum) or alloys in a common electrolyte and connect them with a voltmeter the voltmeter will show an electric current flowing between the two. This is how the battery in your car works.
When the current flows, material will be removed from one of the metals or alloys (the ANODE ) and dissolve into the electrolyte. The other metal (the CATHODE) will be protected.
The electrolyte can be contained in a variety of solutions. Most commonly water (the most common electrolyte being salt and other minerals). If you live by the sea I would never store my guns with a snap cap (aluminum, brass). The salt air significantly increases the risk of galvanic corrosion.
Likewise, any ionic contaminents in your gun oil/cleaner can also serve as electrolyte but not so much so as salt water...

The risk is low, but it is there nevertheless, esp in humid environments.

In addition, leaving rubber in contact with metal is a big no-no! As such I cannot advise the eraser technique of the previous poster...
 

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mjgunner-
I agree. I should have clarified that it is just a fast inexpensive way to snap your pins. I always snap them and break my gun down. However my gun never sits for more than 4 or 5 days without being shot so in my case I would probably be ok. That was a good point you brought up.
 
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