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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi from a new user! My wife and I are just about ready to start shooting over our first German Shorthair. It will be quail, chukar, and at some point pheasant.

I inherited my dad's late-70's 1100, which he bought for duck hunting, which alas, he never got to do. It's equipped with a non-ribbed, single-beaded smooth 30" barrel marked "full" (choke, obviously), and indicates it's for 3" magnum shells.

I'm trying to understand my options, here, and am just getting more confused as I go! Obviously I can swap the barrel out for something a little more upland-bird-friendly (I'm thinking, 26" with the changeable Rem. chokes). But I'm a little fuzzy on the 2-3/4" vs 3" shell issue. Does this receiver mean I have to go with a barrel meant for 3" shells? And, if I stick with a 3" shell configuration, I'm guessing 2-3/4" shells won't behave, right?

Sorry to sound like an idiot! Most of the places you can shop for barrels don't make it very clear what will and won't make sense. I'll also take any quick advice about the appropriate load/shot for these small-ish birds in fairly close-in hunting. Going to have to shoot a lot of clays to get used to the shotgun, but the emphasis is ultimately on the birds, not the clays. Hey - someday I'll buy another gun, too - but here's this virginal 1100, and it seems a shame not to put it to work! Thanks in advance for any help and clarification on the barrel issue!
 

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I have a Remington 1100 and haven't had any problems with it. It is also chambered for 3" shells, however I never use them and it ejects the 2 3/4" shells just fine. 2 3/4" shells are all you need to use any way. 3" will probably get old quick if you are shooting a lot.
 

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Your 1100 Mag will feed any 3" and most standard load 2 3/4" shells. You might have problems if you try shooting light 1 oz loads, so stick with standard 1 1/8 oz 2 3/4 inch shells and you should be fine. Most of the mail order catalogs sell replacememt barrels for 1100. The Cabelas catalog I have here only list replacement Remington barrels for 2 3/4" guns. Hastings also makes replacement barrels for 3" 1100. Check with Remington and them shop around. After you have a shorter barrel try some standard hunting loads you plan to use at your local skeet range and see how they cycle.

Good Luck

APEXDUCK
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ah! Now we're getting somewhere. So, because my 1100 is chambered for 3" shells, I have to buy a barrel to match (whether or not I actually shoot 2-3/4" shells is a separate matter). Er, right?

Indeed, I have yet to come across any dealers specifically indicating that their 1100 barrels are suitable for the 3" gun. Glad I didn't buy the first good deal I came across. Thanks! Time to keep looking.
 

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Go ahead and buy the 26" vent rib barrel with remchokes. You will not be able to shoot 3" shells out of it, but according to what you will be using it for, (upland bird hunting) it won't matter anyway. I shot the exact same setup for years. Killer Combination!!!! A 3" shell will not cycle through your gun anyway with a 2 3/4" chambered barrel. You'll be just fine just with the 2 3/4"!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ah, clarity! Thanks all, for the input. For such a staple item (the 1100), it's amazing how hard it is to get a basic understanding of this info from Remington. This forum is a tremendous resource. Much obliged! I'll think of you this coming bird season, as soon as I'm done talking our 2-year-old dog into giving me the bird (so to speak!).
 

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First, there is nothing wrong with a 30 inch barrel in the field, especially over a dog. If you want to leave the gun as your father left you the gun you could have the barrel reamed for screw-in chokes. This is not very expensive ($60?), plus, the cost of the chokes. You can usually buy Remington chokes commonly on e-bay, and they are not expensive; never more than $20 each, and most commonly at $10 each. Ron, the gunsmith on this forum, could do this for you.

Another thing I would consider is to purchase another fixed choke barrel in modified choke, which would probably cost about $70, and go as low as $55. A modified choke barrel would match the blueing on your gun. For hunting, except waterfowl, I just think a modified is the perfect choke. If you want a wider pattern sometimes, just use SPREADER loads in your shotgun.

Where you find a modified barrel? Ebay has an active Remington 1100 section, and if you want to see for what price these barrels sell go to the "completed section" once you are at the "Remington 1100" section. In other words, when you go to ebay, just type "Remington 1100 barrel" in the search.

Another place to buy barrels (used) is on the Gunbroker discussion forum, where they have a "wanted" section...look at the index...little know feature of Gunbroker.

Be aware that Remington had some problem with barrels on new guns where the threads were not in right and they didn't shoot straight. Remington took care of most of these barrels, but some are on the market. So you want to ask that question, if you buy a replacement barrel (used) to force the seller to make disclosure on this issue.

One of the other posters gave a good place to buy new barrels, and they are only about $165. If you took your current barrel and sold it on e-bay you would only have about $100 into a new barrel (net after selling your old barrel)....however, you will have a parkerized barrel on the gun; not a blued barrel like on your 1100 currently.

One of the other posters also commented about the fact that the gun is a field gun. The Remington 1100 does not have compensating barrels (like on Beretta) so you do have to put 1 1/8 oz loads in them minimum. However, you could ream the ports on the barrel and shoot lighter loads...if you shot heavier loads you could do damage to the gun.

I don't know. If it were me, I would just buy a modified barrel for the gun and get a few spreader shotgun shells when I wanted to hunt in close-close.
 
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Go here for a rem-choke barrel to fit your 1100. I have searched and found them to be the best price.

https://www.dnrsports.net/miva/Contact.html
This is D&R Sports Center in Nanticoke, PA
570-735-1752

For your type of hunting I would mostly use the improved cyl.
The information of new replacement rem-choke barrels only being available in parkerized is not true. You can get a nicely blued barrel to match your gun. Be sure to tell them it is for an older model 1100 so you dont get the light contour.
 
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hi i realize this is along time after your first question and by now you probably have what you want. that being said no one seemed to tell you the difference on these barrels ,the 3" mag barrel has has a single port for the gas exchange. this is because a 3" mag produces much more gas and as previosly stated a 3 through a 2 3/4 which has 2 ports could come back hard and do damage over time to the gun .now a 2 3/4 barrel will go on your gun i have one and it works fine in fact i have run some 3's through it by mistake and did no damage ,altough i dont recomend this, i have a friend who is very expierenced ,and has the trophys to prove it .he swears by this configuration and has never had a problem. the more important issue with an 1100 is to keep it clean and replace the 3 o rings when it starts to screw up they are in front of the mag ,and wear out in time i always carry an extra set as they are easy to change and save the disapointment of having a singleshot when the birds are really fliing. i agree a short barrel is faster when upland in fact i am looking at a 21" for grouse in northern Mn. as aposed to the 30" i use for ducks and geese .in the event you do some waterfoul hunting DO NOT use your 30" as it was a full for lead which is no longer legal for waterfoul and the steel shot will damage the barrel .i have seen what it does it groves the barrel and the pattern is all messed up the tube type barrel is the way to go, as they have a full for steel. hope i helped ,just remember clean is the answer to keep a 1100 cycliing
 
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"Guest" makes a magnificant point I currently am using the same setup. A 3" magnum 1100 receiver with a 2 3/4" barrel 28" w/ Remchoke. It will cycle as light as 7/8 oz. as long as it is spotless clean. To clean my gun I use a Scotch Brite pad and a little Outers Bore Solvent to get the heavy stuff off then after I am done clean it I usually spray one spray of WD-40 on the magazine tube where the moving parts are. With this combination of cleaning I have shot over 350 1 oz. sport loads through it without a jam. Good Luck!!
 
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"Guest" makes a magnificant point I currently am using the same setup. A 3" magnum 1100 receiver with a 2 3/4" barrel 28" w/ Remchoke. It will cycle as light as 7/8 oz. as long as it is spotless clean. To clean my gun I use a Scotch Brite pad and a little Outers Bore Solvent to get the heavy stuff off then after I am done clean it I usually spray one spray of WD-40 on the magazine tube where the moving parts are. With this combination of cleaning I have shot over 350 1 oz. sport loads through it without a jam. Good Luck!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well! It's been a couple of years since I first posted on this topic, and it recently occured to me to check back up on the thread... and lo and behold, there were some later responses that I missed.

So, if you're curious how the story ended: I'm still using the 1100, and bought a 26-inch, fixed-choke (modified) "skeet" type barrel, and am using it with great success on quail, chukar, and even pheasant. That 3" mag receiver is having no problems with the 2-3/4" barrel, and of course, I'm having no problems with those shorter shells on the birds and clays I'm shooting... so all's well that ends well.

Of course, in the time that's passed, my wife and I have become completely hooked on shooting over our dogs (two Shorthairs, now). She's got a new Benelli Legacy, and I've added a Browning Citori White Lighting (both in 20ga). Love both those guns. The old 1100 is my big-bird howitzer, and the 20s are perfect for smaller east-coast birds.
 

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Four posts in over 1 1/2 years. :shock: You need to step back from the computer and get out more! :lol: Glad to here all is well with you, yours, and that lemon-hunert. :wink:
 

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Just a note about WD 40 since it was mentioned here. WD40 should never be used on firearms. It will build up into a varnish and cause fuction problems. There are many stories about how bad this is for guns. There are many good lubes like FP10 Rem Oil, CLP etc that are made just for firearms so there is no need to use WD40.

Regards,
 
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