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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hunt upland birds - pheasant, chukar and quail mostly. Interested in shooting trap as I don't get out hunting as often as I would like. I see that trap guns tend to have longer barrels, raised ribs and combs. Not sure why, but I would like to know. I do have a Remington 11-87 and I am wondering if it would make sense to buy a 30 in. barrel and place a comb pad for the purposes of shooting trap before I invest in a trap gun?
 

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Trap guns are designed specifically to shoot one game, trap. Trap targets are a rising target and that's why trap guns shoot a bit high. The stocks are designed to allow consistant mounting and reduce as much felt recoil as possible because you simply shoot a lot of rounds in trap. The bbls are longer allowing for a longer sighting radius... simply easier to point out a long target with a long bbl than with a short one.

Your idea of coverting your present gun is a valid one. Get a 30" Bbl as you suggested and simply leave a full choke tube in it. You could also build up the comb to the point where you see a wee bit of rib between the beads and then put it on a pattern board to see where the point of impact is. Anything between 60-70% of the pattern above the pont of aim should work fine. That allows for built in lead on rising targets. The only other thing would be the length of the stock possibly being too short on a field gun. To correct this you could have a new pad and spacer installed or some sort of adjustable butt plate.

Hook up with some old farts at your local trap club and almost any of them should be willing to help you. Good luck. BTW, one of the best starter trap guns out there is the current production Remington 1100 Classic Trap.... basics are the same as what you have.
 

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SS said:
BTW, one of the best starter trap guns out there is the current production Remington 1100 Classic Trap.... basics are the same as what you have.
Not too bad for some of us veteran shooters either :wink: , bought mine in 2005, at which time I had 35 years trap experience :shock:

I shoot mine by choice, not ecconomic necessity. Fits me as if it was custom made for me, weight distribution/ergonomics suit me and the felt recoil is minimal. Works for me :D
 

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Art;

Your 1187 will work fine. Depending on the distance of your cheekbones below your eyes, it might even shoot a little high. Even if it doesn't though, all you will have to do is cover the rising trap targets with the muzzle to provide the necessary forward and upward lead. Covering targets isn't ideal but it will work well enough for quite a while.

I would suggest you get a shell catcher or deflector though. Some shooters are very irritated when they are standing to your right and being hit repeatedly with your ejected hulls.
 

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I pickup a Browning XS sport 12ga and shoot trap skeet and sporting clays plus I gone bird hunting with it and I been doing just fine with it......... in my book its been a good all around gun for what I do. I am even going to try coyote hunting with it this morning.
Last night I shot doubles with it at the trap club and I hit the one time 44 birds out of 50 then round 2 that I sign up for I hit 49 birds out of 50.
This last weekend I shot saturday night trap under the light with some guys that has shot for 40 some year and don't miss very much and I win 2 or them rounds out of 3 that I sign up for. The lost that 3rd round in a 35yd shoot off. ...... I called for the bird and shot way to fast ........... I am still kicking myself in the but for that move.

Like a old trap shooter told me one time a shotgun is a shotgun but it the way you pull it up and hold it the way you shoot it and the choke tubes you use in it, and if you can get all that together you can stay up with be best of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great information. I appreciate it. I understand that trap targets are rising, moving away and shot a somewhat greater distance. Easy to understand the need for a longer barrel and a full choke, but hard to understand the need for an elevated comb and why the sight plane should be different than if you are shooting at a moving bird. I guess I will figure that out when I try shooting trap! Sounds like technique, practice and adjustments to the gun set up will result in more success
 

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I don't think its as much the long barrel its what choke you use.
This is also my first year shooting trap and I do it with a Browning SX Sport with a 28" barrel, and I am hiting birds from the 27yd make and some times on the shoot off's I been in I been back as far as 35yd.
I did start out shooting with the Browning choke's that come with the gun but then I order some new Briley spectrum invector plus choke tubes and the shotgun is shooting a lot better even at long range.
I started out this summer shooting a Full choke and I have stay with a full choke shooting trap, I have won some awards this summer and I also been winning some of the money shoots I been going to.

Yes a lot of it is getting to know your shotgun.

Get on some trap shooting league's and go for it ...... that's what help me. Go to a trap shoot and see how the other guys stand and shoot then go home pickup your shotgun and see how it feels to you standing and moving from side to side. I am a long range rifle shooter also and I like to hold my shotgun like I do a long range rifle and trying to shoot off hand. Some of the guys I talk to told me I can't do that but its what ever feels good to you. Go shoot some skeet or sporting clays that will also help you also on trap shooting.
I know as soon as you try trap shooting your going to like it like I did. Now I can't wait for the next shoot to come along I can go to.
I had a guy tell me last night I need a trap gun, I told him the gun I am using feels good to me why change. Your also better off not doing alot of changes till you feel good about your shooting....... like pick a name brand of ammo and stay with it and choke tubes pick one and stay with it. For trap I pick a full choke and I still shooting a full choke. But now that are leagues are over I am trying some new stuff to see if I can better myself before next spring trap league's start up again.

Are leagues are over for the year but the club is putting on for fun doubles shoot. I shot that last night and I had a blast. This coming Sunday I going to a money trap shoot and hope to win alittle bit.
When I go to a trap shoot I sign up on shoots where I know some of the guys can out shoot me and that will also help you to shoot better. I been pushing myself all summer trap shooting and I can say I can run with some of the best now and give them a hard time.

Hey just get out there and go for it ......... your going to love it I just know you will.

Keep us posted on how you do.
 

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Art;

The longer barrel for trap shooting is due to the longer sighting plane for greater accuracy and the extra weight the extra length provides, which promotes smoother swings.

A higher comb positions the eye above the level of the rib. Like raising the rear sight on a rifle, the gun will shoot higher (above its point of aim.) That eliminates the need to cover the rising targets with the barrel to provide the vertical lead necessary to break them.

The average distance from shooters to trap targets when they are broken is about 33 yards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK. now I get it. I added a comb pad which does change the sight plane and creates a space, although very small, between the two sight beads. I am sure that when I find a 30" barrel adjustments will need to be made. I have a clay thrower and I will get out there this weekend and give it a try
 

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Art

I am in my 5th year, what I did 5 years ago was, add the middle bead, a comb pad, and a spacer to add almost an inch to the length of pull. I did this on a shotgun that I have hunted with for years, the results for me have been in general good, It is the space between my ears that has given me most of the problems I have had.

That 11-87 is a shotgun that will propably get you well past the new to shooting trap , and well down the road to knowing what you want out of the sport.
 
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