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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First post on this board--looks like a friendly and helpful place for information!

OK, here goes: I use painted aluminum zoom type (red) snap caps in my Beretta 687 O/U to release the tension on the springs for storage--I don't store the gun taken apart--and leave the caps in the barrels. Someone at a clays range said that this was a bad practice for two reasons. One, the dissimilar metals can cause electrolysis over the long haul and two, the caps can cause moisture buildup in the receiver end of the barrels. I always clean, oil and grease my gun after use. Any thoughts and/or advice on this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the suggestions. BTW, whenever I go to the range and crack the gun for the first time, I go out of my way to let people know that there are snaps in there so they don't freak. Many of the people at the club also use snaps so they're used to it.

I was debating the woolies and think I'll try a set and also make sure my zoomies are well-lubed when I store them in the gun.

Also I didn't know about that trick with the forend, thanks for that.

So no one's worrying about electrolysis even if the metal snap is lubed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Does anybody know where to order the brass, adjustable type snaps for the best price?

I find a handy place to store snaps so they don't get lost when I'm shooting is in the two shell loops in my vest.

And I agree with Barry, snaps or not, even if you KNOW the gun is safe, the business end should always point in a safe direction. If people see you regularly observing good gun safety/courtesy and the barrels are always pointed downrange or skyward when clearing they're less likely to get uncomfortable when they see your snaps pop out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I just spoke with Ed, the gunsmith at the Beretta Gallery in New York and I asked him this very question. He said I'd be shocked at how many times he dry fires guns with no snap caps in them and he has never had a problem with firing pins. I still cringe a bit at the idea of not having something for the firing pin to strike. But this man really seems to know his stuff and works on guns that range from $1000 to $75,000 and more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Snap cap use is a relevant question because a lot of us grew up hearing that they were critical or seeing others use them religiously. Guns may have evolved to the point where snap caps are somewhat obsolete now, but I still believe a spring is better stored with the tension released.

Because sporting guns can get real expensive real quick, I want to protect my investment, even if the risk is minimal. Ed, the Beretta gunsmith in NYC did say to me that he dry fires the weapons he works on all the time, thereby implying that he believes it's better to relieve the tension on the springs.
 
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