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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Gunsmithing and Restoration Forum--

I came over to ask a question. I have an old Iver Johnson Champion 16 ga single-shot, made in about 1910-1915 (according to the Iver expert on another forum). I paid the princely sum of $58 for this fine shotgun, and despite its high age and low value, I have taken a liking to it. In fact, I want to hunt with it occasionally. Call me sentimental :lol:

Here's the latest problem. I fired off a low-pressure shell in it (I wouldn't use high-pressure ones, although my gunsmith ok'd it). The extractor barely moves with a spent shell in the chamber--I had to use a cleaning rod to get it out. When I pushed the spent shell out, the extractor did move out about an eighth of an inch, but it's not stong enough, nor does it move far enough, to extract an A-zoom 16 ga snapcap (they are made with some weight).

What's wrong with it, and is it something I can fix? Needs a new spring somewhere? Gunk and goo inside the extractor assembly? Broken part in there?

I haven't messed with it or pulled on the extractor, of course. Any suggestions? Of course, I can take the old girl back to the gunsmith, but if it's a simple fix I'd just as soon do it myself.

Thanks!
 

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Jeff,

I'm pretty sure that you can fix it yourself without being a gunsmith. Although the extractor spring may need replaced for a complete restoration, I'll bet that just cleaning out the old congealed oil and grease will improve it a lot.

Take the barrel off the stock. Pour some mineral spirits (paint thinner) into an old can such as a coffee can. Stand the breech end of the barrel in the mineral spirits and let it stay there for 15 to 20 minutes. Then work the extractor back and forth to get the mineral spirits down into the groove. The idea is to dissolve and flush out the old gunk. Let it stand a while longer in the mineral spirits.

Then remove and let dry completely. Once the barrel is dry, lubricate the extractor with Breakfree CLP or other good lubricant.

An alternative method would be to remove the extractor. Since I'm not familiar with that gun, I don't know what is involved, but it is probably either held in place by a screw or perhaps you push in and twist on the extractor at the same time to remove it. There should be a spring behind it to provide the power. You might want to replace the spring. Good luck and let us know how it goes. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Ulysses! You seem to be my number one answer man lately :)

Much appreciated, and I'll revisit the gunsmithing forum and tell how it goes, providing I don't screw it up. You know the old rule: if you do somethjing stupid, always look around first thing and see whether anyone noticed :lol:

Best,
 

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The Iver Johnson Champion is in the Firearms Assembly/Disassembly book.
Looks pretty simple. Pop the barrel off and it looks like you should be able to figure it out. Looks like a lever that acts almost like a trigger sear on the ejector. You should be able to move the lever and see the ejector pop out.
I can scan the pages if you need them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Slash--

I've been soaking it in paint thinner and will get around to looking at it later today. If I can't make any sense out of it, I'll post and let you guys know.
 
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