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How much recoil do side by sides have comparred to an o/u in the same gauge, because on the websites it shows side by sides really light comparred to o/u's.
 

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They do kick more, and most of the cheapers ones don't have a recoil pad, just a butt plate.
 

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From my own personal experience I couldn't feal any noticable difference. Last year I hunted with two 20 gauge Beretta's, a Silver Pigeon O/U and a Silver Hawk SXS. Both felt the same in my book. But then I was shooting high brass 6, 2-3/4" field loads. My SXS won't take 3" shells.

It's a safe bet that a 3" 12 gauge SXS that tips the scails a little over 6 pounds will loosen your fillings. It comes down to what you would use a good SXS for. If it's going to be an upland gun and you aren't going to stoke it up with 3" magnums the kick shouldn't be a problem.
 

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Bushrod mentioned a good rule. Actually, "recoil" totally is a result of the load fired vs. the weight of a gun.

But "Kick" is what we feel. OK, call it "perceived recoil" if you feel better. Much of that depends on how the gun fits you, the shape of the stock, how much drop to the stock, shape of the comb, recoil pad, and if the gun has a way of "spreading" the time of recoil over a longer time, like a gas auto.

I have shot a LOT of both O/Us and SXS doubles, fortunately all that fit me well (with one exception). I haven't really noticed a difference in kick between them.

Now for the exception - it was an old SXS with an old-fashioned "crooked" stock with LOTS of drop at comb and MORE drop at heel! WOW! Would THAT gun kick! The comb would roll up and smack you in the chops every time you would pull the trigger. But a new stock on it with normal dimensions took that firebreathing tiger and turned it in to a pussycat!

BobK
 

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Assuming that the guns have the same weight and same stock dimensions then the felt recoil should be the same.

I've never been able to tell the difference between O/U or SxS if the weight and the stock dimensions are the same.
 

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FlyChamps said:
Assuming that the guns have the same weight and same stock dimensions then the felt recoil should be the same.
Not really. You may not notice it, but there is a difference. With a SxS, shooting the right barrel will have its rearward vector up and to the right, up and to the left for the left barrel. Shooting the bottom barrel of an O/U will have its force vector only slightly up, but directly in line with the axis of the gun (I'm assuming equal cast for both guns) and shooting the top barrel will have its vector up, but still in line with the axis of the gun.

The rotation caused by these forces will change the perceived recoil slightly. Maybe not enough for YOU to notice, but it is there. Now, if the stock dimensions were altered to compensate for these forces, as a well designed and fitted stock should be, then it becomes very difficult for even a senbsitive person to notice a difference.

Frank
 

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Yet the truth must be told, Frank is right. The more open choke (always the bottom barrel) of a O/U is going to provide the least recoil of any of the four barrels. Its recoil comes back on a stright line against the shoulder and is felt less than the recoil of a SxS whose barrels are higher and at a greater angle to accentuate recoil. The recoil from a SxS is always at an angle and that creates torque.
 

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Engstfeld said:
Yet the truth must be told, Frank is right.
Frank may be right in theory, but in actual practice the difference (if any) is so small I have never been able to detect it, and I'm sure most people can't. As far as I'm concerned, if the difference is not detectable, there isn't any.
 

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Well, physics aside, my 16ga LC kicks like a mule with Win 1oz Super X loads. I shoot it only occasionally.

However, my Laurona 20ga SxS is nice to shoot, but I only shoot 3/4oz reloads in it.

Perceived recoil matters most to the one on the perceiving end. 8)
 

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The rule of 96 permits a lot more recoil than most would like.

With the rule of 96, here's the formula for a 1 1/8 ounce 12 gauge, in lbs:

(1.125*96)/16 = 108/16 = 6.75

I can assure you, most shooters will find shooting any volume of 1 1/8 ounce loads through a 6.75lb gun to be an unpleasant experience.
 

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Good gunfit and choice of ammunition can help things.

Eley ferinstance make a 1 3/16"oz lead load called "Maximum" that is designed to be shot in lightweight 2 1/2" chambered guns. I use them for duck (legal in Scotland) with no bother in a 6lb 6oz 12 bore.

Mind you you wouldn't want to use the combination all the time, but a couple of dozen is fine.

Regards
Eug
 

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Seamus O'Caiside said:
...but in actual practice the difference (if any) is so small I have never been able to detect it, and I'm sure most people can't. As far as I'm concerned, if the difference is not detectable, there isn't any.
Seamus,

I'm not sure if it is the actual recoil, or the gun's reaction, but I certainly do notice a difference. I think that this is most evident on a skeet field (I know, I shouldn't be shooting a SxS there, but sometimes I just practice for bird season! :wink: ), particularly at the Low 7 bird. Firing the right barrel of the SxS will produce a definite up and to the right gun movement that is easily distinguishable from an O/U.

I can also see where repeated firing of the left barrel would cause a fair amount of ckeet slap, which may have some effect on the shooter over a long day. I really don't notice this as a problem, because when I shoot for practice for the bird season, I only use the left barrel for doubles.

You are absolutely correct in that if one does not notice a difference, there is no difference.

Frank
 

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Two guns both the same weight, stock dims and shooting the same load should produce an equal amount of recoil.

The recoil from a sxs will feel different to most people as the muzzle flip is off of verticle. This is why the sxs is not popular as a clay gun. It is harder to teach someone to shoot a sxs than it is an o/u as it is harder to control the muzzle rise which can make the second shot more difficult.

Leeboy
 
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