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As said, there was no Manhatten Arms Company. That was a "Trade Brand Name" used by several makers on shotguns made for and sold by wholesale sporting goods dealers, retail chain stores, independent retailers and importers in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The known makers were Neumann Freres (Belgium), F. Dumoulin (Belgian), J. P. Sauer & Son (German), Harrington & Richardson (USA) and Hunter Arms Company (USA). The largest seller was Schoverling, Daley & Gates a wholesale sporting goods dealer. If the gun was made in Belgium, there will be Belgian proof marks stamped on the bottom of the barrels consisting of the letters "ELG" in an oval with a crown on top. Most of the Belgian made guns were imported between 1880 and 1914 when World War One cut off exports from Europe. These guns were made using the technology and metallurgy of the times. They will have damascus barrels with 2 1/2 inch chambers designed for shells loaded with black powder and lead shot. They were not designed for modern 3 inch or magnum shells loaded with high pressure smokeless powder and steel shot. Since we can not see your gun to determine its condition, we err on the side of caution and say that it is not safe to shoot so hang it on the wall!
 

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Gentlemen: I have been researching to determine if a S x S, hammered shot gun left to me by my dad is worth restoring, not a lot of sentimental value as someone probably gave it to him somewhere along the line. In that research I came across this old thread which looks to end around 9 or 10 years ago. The gun is in less than perfect condition, worst of all someone down the line dovetailed a few extra inches to the stock adding a butt with what looks like a plate from an old 30-03. All the markings indicate that this was of Belgium manufacture, at least based on the advice from the conversation here. The only difference I see from some of the others is there is no serial number anywhere I can find. Advice? is it worth taking to a decent gunsmith? I live near NYC, so the gun was probably originally purchased locally over 100 years ago. If yes, any recommendations as to who is good with these old models? I appreciate any advice.
 

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As a connection with your father it is of course priceless.
It has very little practical value, may not be safe to shoot, and the cost of any restoration attempt would far exceed its worth.

Please check this thread for ID help
https://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewto ... 5&t=232252

We might be able to provide more information as to maker and DOM if you would post full size close up images of every mark on the rib, barrel flats and just forward of the flats, and action flats.
 

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Gentlemen,

Did he make it home from Afghanistan safely, anybody heard from him?

all the best,

Pine Creek/Dave
L.C. Smith Man
 
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