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I was skeet shooting today. Today I was shooting my Superposed Skeet, a 1967 gun, no salt.

I have a Verona (good reviews here) a Remington 1100, A Sweet 16, and some Mossbergs. All nice guns.

But, nothing shoots or handles like the Superposed. No other action is as smooth or easy to use. No other gun points like it does, although that is of course subjective.

I don't know why I don't use it more. It's a great firearm.
 

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GMOUNTAIN: Yes a great gun designed by JOHN MOSES BROWNING. The last gun he designed,but did not live to see it go into full production. I have read & heard several not very nice or correct comments made about the barrel selector on the safety. When shooters/hunters are trying to select which barrel they want to fire 1st. That foreward/back, right/left barrel selector has caused some to revert to profanity. I have the same type selector on my EMILO RIZZINI o/u.
 

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Sometimes I leave my Sweet 16 home and take a 1965 20g Superposed skeet gun to the grouse woods... It's perfect for the quick shots. I think I'd shoot it better if it had a humped back though... :lol:...

 

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A500R said:
I have read & heard several not very nice or correct comments made about the barrel selector on the safety. When shooters/hunters are trying to select which barrel they want to fire 1st. That foreword/back, right/left barrel selector has caused some to revert to profanity.
I like it. Easier for me to use than a Beretta and surely way better than a Ruger's that feels like it is broke. The operation of the safety/selector was one of many reasons that drawed me to Browning o/u's in the first place. The same people that complain about it probably had a hard time of it learning potty training and tying their shoes... :lol:
 

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My ol' Super is pretty much a beater. I took it out a couple of weeks ago and despite it's 70 years of wear and tear, it still does it's job. Mine has "Twin Singles", so I don't have any problems with barrel selection! They have to be the ultimate trigger set up for a game gun.

Jim
 

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I've never had any problems with the safety/barrel selecter. Always worked fine. I have an SKB that has the selector on the trigger (push the button right and left to select). It has been known to double if the button has moved slightly and its always a big suprise. GJ
 

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That's a nice one, GEODUXX--I've got it's twin brother, down to the year and the factory pad, in my safe.
Hard to decide which one to take lots of days--The 20 Super or the Sweet 16--but the 16 usually wins, 'cause not much escapes that "sweet" pattern of IC # 8's...and I'm not that great a shot...
 

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The twin single not only doesn't have a selector, it can be equipped with sub gauge tubes without trigger modifications. Best of both worlds. By the way, my Super with first generation single trigger does not have the safety mounted selector and works just fine. My trigger plate mounted sliding selector may be locked in place for all I know, since I don't remember ever using it. Both barrels are fuller choke so no need to select.
 

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My twin single triggers are a blast to shoot! Once I trained my finger to move automatically, it was very natural. No worrys about which barrel to fire; the triggers could be made to fire whichever barrel you want, all though that has to done by a Browning qualified smith.
My 1932 is a "Light Weight" model, predating the Lightnings that came out in 1936; it has a slimmer forearm and NO rib, just matting down the barrell...all this at just 7 lbs...you can carry it all day in the field.
 

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Your "Lightweight" is probably a standard "Lightning" which you describe as the 1936 model. The "Lightning" has slim forend and ribless barrel. Your serial number may indicate 1932 but in reality, lots of Supers with low numbers were sent out later than the number would indicate. My "Lightning" is in the low 10,000 range but not shipped until mid 1940. My Midas Trap was supposed to be a 1932 gun by the serial number, but it was not shipped until 1936. By the way, my "Lightning" only weighs 6 1/2 pounds with 26" barrels.
 

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Yup, the shipping dept was never closely tied to the manufacturing line. The guns were all assembled in sequential number, but may have set around for 4-5 years before shipping. Other groups, only 20-50 serial numbers different, shipped in days.
I'll stick with Ned Schwing's book on this though. He says the first introduction of the slimmer forearm was 32-35, which fits my serial number, 328x. Plus, my matted barrell doesn't have the stripe down the middle the 36 Lightnings had.
I actually think my gun was made in 1930 or 31; serial numbers 4801-4900 were all received in the shipping dept in late late 31 and early 32. But Supers weren't sold in the US until 1931, so it probably sat in the shipping dept while everyone figured out how to sell a $107 gun as the Depression was really getting into high gear. They only sold 200 Supers worldwide in 1934, only one of those in the US. Tough times.
 

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How would we know what model it was except by comparing features or buying a letter? I've not seen a prewar Lightning (or Lightweight) marked as such. Do you have a Browning letter on your Lightweight?
 

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Nope, no letter as of yet. But my serial number predates the design of the Lightning, and if I compare the Lightning's striped matte rib, my gun does not have one. That and the fact I know the serial numbers 4800-4900 were built before the Lightning was introduced, I surmise my gun is the "Light Weight" as described in Schwing's book on pg 55.

Date of sale, and date of manufacture, can be very far apart. I don't know when mine was sold, but I feel confident it is about a 1931-1932 manufacture.
 
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