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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a lightly used Merkel 1620 and one side of the grip has started to fade, appears that the stain has worn off so it is lighter than the other side and the rest of the stock. Is this something that I can address myself or better to send off to someone? Will Truoil or Clenzoil do the trick?



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This needs to be restained and finished and recut the checkering. Best for a professional.
Adding finishes will not match the color.

CT
 

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Agreed. I tried to touch up some scuffed checkering on an AL391 with a matte poly finish - it worked insofar as the wood is sealed/protected, but doesn't look as clean as original.
 

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It really doesn't look like the checkering is worn. It does look like someone applied Truoil to the stock and didn't properly protect the checkering.

I would do the following as a first attempt at a fix,
  • clean all of the checkering with mineral spirits using a soft toothbrush. Be thorough as gun oil often accumulates in the grooves along with other grime.
  • let it dry
  • in a small container, mix Truoil with mineral spirits in about a 1:3 ratio.
  • apply the mixture to the checkering with the soft toothbrush, sparingly, one time.
  • let it dry at least overnight and check your results

You do not want to fill the checkering grooves with undiluted Truoil. Also, use real mineral spirits from a can typically labeled as paint thinner. Odorless mineral spirits is not what you use. If that simple process does not get results, have the checkering re-cut, etc., etc.

Also, Clenzoil is a CLP product not a wood finish.
 

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You could recut the checkering and apply 1 coat of either Laurel Mountain Forge Permalyn Sealer, or one coat of Birchwood Casey Gunstock sealer and filler. I started re-checkering some of my used guns about 5 years ago. It is not difficult (just tedious), as long as the original checkering can be re-traced (yours looks straightforward). I have never just cut the checkering without refinishing the wood. I suppose it can be done, but may not match the finish -as mentioned. I usually put several coats of finish on the stocks/forearms, but only apply one coat of sealer to the wood, including the checkering (I stain and seal the entire stock/
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forearm, but no other finish is applied to the checkering). Just started re-checkering a Weatherby model 92 forearm with a deep scratch - see attached
 

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are you, or the previous owner left handed? I've seen checkering worn more on one side, than the other. I do know you will be very pleased with re-cut checkering if you choose that path, and would recommend both sides. Not sure what the impact of re-sale value would be, depending on the work you have done. Use a magnifying glass and see if the checkered diamonds are worn down, or are still sharp. If sharp, then the recent cleaning post is the way to go. If those "diamonds" are worn down, only re-checkering can bring them back
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great thank you for the replies. Checkering seems to be in good shape, more of a finish issue. I will try the cleaning recommendation above, or may just go ahead and send off to someone.
 

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IMO the checkering does not need recut. The borders are intact as well as the diamonds.

I would clean as others have suggested with a toothbrush and mineral spirits. Let it dry completely and then I would use Timberluxe in the checkering at full strength. It does not need to be cut like TruOil does for that purpose.

Blot out any excess with a Kleenex or the like and after 2 days of drying look at it and redo if necessary. I think Timberluxe will blend those slightly darker areas in nicely. Good luck
 

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I too would clean it as suggested. However BLO would be my choice with a couple of very light coats with a toothbrush a few weeks apart.
 

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BLO offers little to no water protection and is used for indoor furniture. Tru-oil or timberlox would get my vote. Also BLO takes forever to dry unless you add japan dryer.
 
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