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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Out at the gun club the other day saw an NSSF certified instructor teaching a young lady . Finished my round and went over to him and asked "You have time to help me?","Sure,let me finish with her". Next thing I know there are five men needing help.So we all drive down to the end field and start learning. That was an intense hour and half of learning.Amazing what I learned , what I was doing wrong , what to do right. Well worth the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hello Joe Skeeter:It was Early Piety.And he is always sure to tell you "Just like Early in the morning". Hell of a nice guy and it is amazing how a good instructor can see things you are doing wrong. Hello to dervari: We got 5 stand on the far left as you drive in then 10 skeet/trap fields. All this is in a straight line and club house is in about the middle.It is the oldest gun club in America.
 
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if I could start over and change just one thing it would be to never shoot skeet! But I'm in love with the game now. But I would go back and START with an instructer AND stay with the same instructer for at least three months.

Shooting skeet is really about the worst way to LEARN HOW to shoot skeet and takes more money and time than with a good instructer. If you try teaching yourself, odds are you'll learn a lot of bad habits and habits are hard to break (I'm still riding targets way too long at 3,4,5...I hit 'em, but it's killing my doubles game and it's just an old habit). You may bust a few, but do you why they broke or how to do it again. If you miss, do know why or did you see where your shot went?

Just shooting skeet with the good ole boys helping you out may seem like a good way to start. And bless their hearts the good ole boys are really trying to help! The problem is you'll hear 27 different ways to hit high 2...and they all work for the good ole boy telling you how to hit it...but you ain't him. One of the things I hear all the time is "You are behind it" and about half the time the shooter was not behind it (which brings up one of my pet peeves...if you can't or didn't see the shot string don't say squat! I've seen this happen way too many times...new shooter winds up shooting 18 feet in front of high 4). If you're gonna shoot with GOB's, pick one and listen only to him (now your instructer).

If you want to get good fast, get a good instructer fast! They are worth the money you spend in saved shells alone.
 

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Mismost: Excellent post. Most brand-new shooters shoot high/low; not behind, and many new shooters really do try to put excessive lead on high-house #2, as a result of well-intenioned advice.

Many clubs now post this sign: "DO NOT OFFER UNSOLICITED ADVICE", right along with their rules.

I got a certified instructor, when I started, and have stayed with him for just under two years. However, I wanted to experiment with the different styles, and I just needed a smart instructor to take me through the various styles of shooting, until I decided on one style for myself. In this respect, the instructor was invaluable, and mine did, in fact, understand the mechanics of the various styles.

I entered the market with 30 inch barrels popular, and I am now just discovering that I like the old 26 inch barrels for my style of low-gun, international skeet shooting.

It is all part of the passion for the sport, but I think a person does have to match his personality to the sport and choose a shooting style that pleases the personality, and still produces results. For example, sustained lead is favored right now, but there have been world champions that stuck the barrel in the window, and chased the clay down.

An instructor is a great aid, as you mentioned, but I do believe that a person has to develop a "style" which suits the shooter.
 
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