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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Shot a 20 from 16 yds. Pretty happy with that. It's my third round of trap ever, and I am liking this sport.

Remington 870 Wingmaster LC 12 ga with factory Remington 1 oz. 8 shot loads.

The 5 misses came mostly on left hand birds from the first two stations. I am a left-handed shooter, so I need to do some work on that side. I am open to suggestions on this from the experts on this site.
 

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Also make sure you are not looking at your barrel or beads when you call pull.
For me, looking at my beads while mounting the gun will cause me to bead check . . But on hard rights ( I’m right handed) my misses are usually because the gun is swinging away from my face and I don’t keep a solid cheek weld on the stock . Next reason is I sometimes don’t see those birds clearly and I lift my head to get a better look . . Ymmv
 

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The usual suspect with trap targets going away from your mount is what badabing noted. Lefty shooting right is driving the comb back into the face and mount making it easier and quicker to push past the target and keep the follow through going past the shot. Reverse, lefty going left is driving the gun away from the comb and mount, more likely to stop gun movement at the trigger pull losing follow through. Answer is ...... practice moving from the body and maintaining the mount during the shot. Try getting a practice field all by yourself and shoot 50 or more targets from post 1 trying to maintain form during all target presentations. The lefts are as easy as the rights.

Maltz
 

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Golden also noted holding wide of the trap house. There are those of us that tend to hold center trap house and follow the target by its angle. Others hold wide of the house and try to start from the center of the target presentation. Example post 1 ..... a foot or 2 to the left of the house, post 3 ..... hold just off center house, post 5 ..... wide right a foot or two.

The theory: Rather a proven winning theory of holding wide is based on all trap targets consistently rise and we develop our gun handling skills based on said rise. We develop more gun handling control for the target raise than chasing the angle. We short stop hard angles and tend to break the target faster than following from the center of the house.

Ive noticed over the years that wide - short stopping technique works better for those using a higher POI. Flatter shooting gun technique seems to work better for those following angles. Then again, let no one forget that trap targets always raise.

Maltz
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Shot a 17 or 18 with the 16ga from 16yds.

Not great, but it's a journey. I felt rushed and distracted at the start. Plus I changed a few things from last time with this gun: foot position, choke (today was modified, last time was full) and barrel (today was bottom, last time was top). Most of my misses were on station 1 on left birds, as usual for me. Thanks to my puller, John.

On the other hand, it was a great day for shooting with overcast and milder temps. Looking for the first 25!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Today was a practice round. James, my puller, gave me some good suggestions - thanks James!. We worked on straight birds from short distance, standing directly behind the trap and also to the left, where I need practice. It helped alot. I shot an heirloom Iver & Johnson single shot 20 gauge, as much for nostalgia as to see if it would be a preferred gun. I think I will save the 20 gauge for small game, and stick with the 870 12 gauge and Citori 16 gauge for trap.
 

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I found that I broke more at the corners (#1 & #5) if I consciously left daylight between my barrel and leading edge of the extreme breaking target (hard left from #1 & hard right on #5) as I followed and swung through the target. You'll never get a chip off a target when you are shooting behind them.
 

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Some of us tend to rush the hard rights/hard lefts because they appear to be moving faster/getting away from us. They aren't.
In fact, their velocity is the same AND they are moving AWAY from the shooter even more slowly than a straightaway target.
So, we have even more time than usual to get on the bird.
I've found that I miss fewer hard rights/lefts if I consciously slow the shot down just a bit for them.
 

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Beretta 682x trap, Maxus GC
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Some of us tend to rush the hard rights/hard lefts because they appear to be moving faster/getting away from us. They aren't.
In fact, their velocity is the same AND they are moving AWAY from the shooter even more slowly than a straightaway target.
So, we have even more time than usual to get on the bird.
I've found that I miss fewer hard rights/lefts if I consciously slow the shot down just a bit for them.
And pivoting from the waist will help you, don't count on arm swing to make a good follow through!
 
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