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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I weant to the clays range today for some pracctice and the stations that routinely whip my but mercilessly are the ones with fast crossing shots. I seem to be slow to draw a bead on them then i cant get the timing even close. I will mot be able to get to the range for a couple weeks. Untill then are there any exercises i can do at home to become more coordinated at following these kinds of targets? I thought of just practicing swinging the gun following lines in the garage or something. Any ideas?
 

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John800 said:
I weant to the clays range today for some pracctice and the stations that routinely whip my but mercilessly are the ones with fast crossing shots. I seem to be slow to draw a bead on them then i cant get the timing even close. I will mot be able to get to the range for a couple weeks. Untill then are there any exercises i can do at home to become more coordinated at following these kinds of targets? I thought of just practicing swinging the gun following lines in the garage or something. Any ideas?
Three things in your post worry me:

1) "draw a bead"?? Forget the bead, forget the gun. Look only at where you want the shot to go. Your brain knows where the gun is.
2) "following these kinds of targets" You have no chance on these if you try to chase the clay. On crossers you need to start in front of the clay and stay in front and then everything seems to slow down.
3)"swinging the gun" An expression I dislike because it implies lack of control. All gun movement should be positive and relative to what the clay is doing. Use the back hand to hold the gun and body together as one and direct the gun movement with the front hand.
 

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BobK said:
You don't direct the gun movement with your hand. The "swing" is all hip movement and it works well IF your foot placement is correct for the shot.
Skeet maybe but not in sporting. This isn't simply my opinion, I'm quoting an ex sporting world champion and several time England sporting shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, ill ax differently. If i am having trouble with fast crossing shots, how am i supposed to be approaching them? Do most of you clay shooters swing through or hold a sustained lead? And what can i do at home to practice this kind of shot? Im looking for practice shooting crossing ducks, not so much to increase my score shooting clays.
 

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Two ways to shoot fast, short-window crossers, I'll use either depending on what the second target is:

1) Maintained, but start with your gun close(r) to your break-point, IOW well in front of your look point. Now your eyes have time to lock on the target before you start moving your gun and your total gun movement is shorter.

2) Use Swing-through and start with your gun at the machine, swing through the streak and trigger. Once mastered, it is maybe 80% as effective as #1 above.

Both however require trust in your ability and definitely no time to "draw a bead" -- you must shoot reactively with little conscious thought.

Practice for the above? I'd reco Ash's 3-bullet drill as it will help you mount to the desired point without having to look at your barrel and you'll gain confidence in where your barrel is pointed:
 

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Try your best to miss in front of them. You won't.
 

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What if the target fires out from behind a bush when you gun has gone beyond the bush to kill the 1st target:

You're going to have to chase that second bird , b/c it's beating you from the get-go. SO--you need to learn swing-thru. I also like swing thru when the target is flashing in and out of shadows. This keeps the gun moving and forces your head to stay on the stock and not lift to get a better look.

For birds above my head where there's plenty of time to see/acquire the bird , I'll use maintained or pull away , depending on the target.

learn them all.

Learn them on a skeet field where it's easy to see what the "leads" are for the different methods.
 

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John800 said:
Ok, ill ax differently. If i am having trouble with fast crossing shots, how am i supposed to be approaching them? Do most of you clay shooters swing through or hold a sustained lead? And what can i do at home to practice this kind of shot? Im looking for practice shooting crossing ducks, not so much to increase my score shooting clays.
Basically, the faster the target is transitioning across your field of fire, the more advantage there is to sustained lead. The problem with swing through and even pull away on such targets is lack of consistency due to the reliance on timing rather than seeing the gap.

Slow transitioning crossers and gentle quartering birds are another story and often lend themselves to swing through or pull away but always remember that one man's fast crosser is another mans medium crosser! Much depends on how well you see things, how good your reflexes and what you're familar with and practised on.
 

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Glad I didn't have to type that all out. Brilliant advice.

JacksBack said:
Two ways to shoot fast, short-window crossers, I'll use either depending on what the second target is:

1) Maintained, but start with your gun close(r) to your break-point, IOW well in front of your look point. Now your eyes have time to lock on the target before you start moving your gun and your total gun movement is shorter.

2) Use Swing-through and start with your gun at the machine, swing through the streak and trigger. Once mastered, it is maybe 80% as effective as #1 above.

Both however require trust in your ability and definitely no time to "draw a bead" -- you must shoot reactively with little conscious thought.

Practice for the above? I'd reco Ash's 3-bullet drill as it will help you mount to the desired point without having to look at your barrel and you'll gain confidence in where your barrel is pointed:
 

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Savannah said:
Glad I didn't have to type that all out. Brilliant advice.
Each to their own obviously, but I can't think of a single scenario involving a crossing target of any description where it's appropriate to start with the gun at the trap.
 

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Trickster said:
Savannah said:
Glad I didn't have to type that all out. Brilliant advice.
Each to their own obviously, but I can't think of a single scenario involving a crossing target of any description where it's appropriate to start with the gun at the trap.
Come shoot some targets at the bigger clubs out West -- and we learned to set them from the courses back East...
 

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JacksBack said:
Come shoot some targets at the bigger clubs out West -- and we learned to set them from the courses back East...
Good chance I'll be able to take you up on that in early 2018 if I can convince my wife that quite a lot of America is fairly civilised. :lol:
 

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The parts that are civilized are the ones in the rural areas - where all the good gun clubs are!!!!

but I can't think of a single scenario involving a crossing target of any description where it's appropriate to start with the gun at the trap.
I agree; if I do that, I am behind from start to finish
 

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This ^^^ is good advice. As a newer shooter, practicing on a skeet field you can move around and back up on will help get you confident on most all crossers and quartering shots under 35 yards you'll see on a clays course.
 

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For a fast crosser I've learned that the proper hold point is vital. Head up, eyes up, head on the stock, see the bird shoot the bird.

I understand the concept of both methods, and probably use a sustained lead due to the proximity and velocity of the bird.

I'm frequently asked how much lead to give crossers, and the truth is, I have no idea, since my focus is on a single point ( the bird).

I don't know how to measure lead with only 1 reference point ( the bird). Measuring lead would require 2 reference points, the barrel and the bird which can cause focusing issues on the target.

If your gun fits properly, trust your eyes and brain to guide you to the target.
 

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and when you miss ???
 
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