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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2nd coat of Tru-Oil dried over night and it is a bit sticky to the touch still. I buffed before the first coat and between coats with 00 steel wool.

The coats are quite light.

Do I need to let it dry longer? Buff with 00 steel wool until it's no longer sticky?

I'd prefer a nice shiny finish when I'm done.

Thanks!
 

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I'm assuming that your Tru-Oil is fresh. Old Tru-Oil is sticky and doesn't dry nearly as well. Wait on this coat (and all others) a bit longer until it's completely dry.

I'd guess that this second coat went on a little thick, or that the first one didn't completely dry. I usually wait two days between coats, even the first one, just to make sure it's dry. All subsequent coats need to be THIN. Some people thin the Tru-Oil to get it to flow farther, I don't. I try to see just how little I can use and still fully cover the stock. I can usually dip/wet only the pad of one finger and get that to cover an entire stock. Did I say thin? STRETCH it into the previous coat, until it SCREAMS. When you are done with the application of each coat, the stock should be nearly dry to the touch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I let the first coat dry overnight and knocked it down with 00 wool before applying the second.

I'll let the gun dry longer and see what happens. The finish looks great, it's just not quite as hard as I wanted it.

I'm shooting on Thursday, maybe I'll just let it sit until then and go shooting. I wanted to have 3 coats on by then but I'd rather not gum up my nice finish. Hopefully the second will dry well by then.

Thanks!
 

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the driers in true oil seem to go bad quickly......if you're having trouble getting it to dry, throw the bottle out and open a fresh one.....it should dry to the touch in just a few hours.....I always buy true oil in small bottles since I can rarely use a whole bottle before it goes bad....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
mike orlen said:
the driers in true oil seem to go bad quickly......if you're having trouble getting it to dry, throw the bottle out and open a fresh one.....it should dry to the touch in just a few hours.....I always buy true oil in small bottles since I can rarely use a whole bottle before it goes bad....
The bottle was fresh off the stores shelf, I had to break the little foil seal before using it.

Who knows how long it sat on the shelf though...

I'll give it another 24 hrs or so and see what happens.
 

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I've made a stock drying box for when I do oil finishes. A lamp holder and bulb and one of these....

http://www.meyerhatchery.com/get_item_5 ... ooders.htm

You can make a box out of about anything. Tru-oil will almost never dry certian times of the year. And when youre applying 12 or more coats a drying box really speeds things along. With my box I can get 2 coats per day. WDO
 

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True oil has linseed oil in it and that can be a problem in drying.

I suggest you consider making your own hand rub finish of 1/4 pure tung oil, 1/4 marine spar varnish (alkyloyd), and 1/2 oderless mineral spirts. Put it on in several light coats the same way you do true oil. I will dry to a rock hard, permanent, glossy finish. Touch up later is very easy - just polish area with steel wool and reapply light coats until fixed area matches rest of stock. I have used this finish on both gun stocks and fine furniture for years with great results. Gives wood a great rubbed in shine appearance and the marine varnish component is practically invulnerable to anything.
 

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When you're using tru-oil, try not to leave the lid off, exposing it to the air. Also as you use more of the Tru-oil and the level goes down more air is locked in the bottle when the lid is replaced, and as it's an air dry product the Tru-oil will begin to dry in the bottle and you'll get a dry goo-ey scum inside.

A trick I picked up, right here on SWG, is to replace the Tru-oil that's used with marbles. As the level goes down, just add a marble to keep the level topped up. That way no air is trapped inside when the lid is replaced. Also, the marbles work great for mixing up the driers by shaking the bottle. -- :idea:

Try not to leave the lid off when using the Tru-oil as air will get in and start to activate the stuff. Usually I put a small amount into a plastic beverage bottle cap and put the lid back on the Tru-oil bottle. I've allowed quite a few bottles of Tru-oil to spoil before I picked up on the marble routine. -- :)

Regards:
Rod
 

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Be carefull with putting a stock in a warm or hot box to dry. IF will force air out of the pores and make bubbles in the finish. Better to warm it up before appying the finish. Then only keep it in a warm, not hot area, to dry.
 

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I personally like pure tung oil the best, but I have used True Oil and Linspeed too. I usually punch a small hole in the lid so that I get it out a drop at a time. I then screw in a drywall screw to plug the hole and store the bottle upside down. Actually. there are a lot of good suggestions in here, I like the marble idea. I beleive the trick is to keep air out of the product.
 

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Scota4570 said:
Be carefull with putting a stock in a warm or hot box to dry. IF will force air out of the pores and make bubbles in the finish. Better to warm it up before appying the finish. Then only keep it in a warm, not hot area, to dry.
Never had a problem here. I've done around 100 stocks. :?:
 

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Any of your varnishes will keep better after they're opened if you simply store them upside down. The air is trapped in the top portion (bottom) when it's stored that way. Then when you open the bottle there is no hardened film to break through. OtH
 

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whitedogone said:
Scota4570 said:
Be carefull with putting a stock in a warm or hot box to dry. IF will force air out of the pores and make bubbles in the finish. Better to warm it up before appying the finish. Then only keep it in a warm, not hot area, to dry.
Never had a problem here. I've done around 100 stocks. :?:
You must be running a lower temp than I did. I made a thermostatically controlled hot box with a fan in it. I ran it at about 120 deg. That must have been too hot. I did find preheating the stock at a higher temp then shooting it helped. Basically have the stock cooling when the finish went on. When I did that the finish was getting sucked into the pores.

When I was doing lots of stock jobs I was using a "touch up" automotive airbrush. It was the type with the reservoir on top. I was shooting "bowling pin" type finishes, Fuller plast, conversion varnish and Glass-kote. The stock was filled with paste filler and stained. I basically had a dead smooth stock that was completely filled before finishing. I attached a broomstick to the stock as a handle so I could hold it and hang it. With those catalyzed finished I could do all the finish in one session. Glass-kote dried to the point it could be wet sanded in about an hour. Then I rubbed them out with rubbing compound. The finish was anything from Weatherby gloss to a matt Remington Mountain rifle looking effect. Customers really liked it. The best part is it is very fast. That counts when my time is worth money. Keep in mind these finishes are very toxic and you must shoot them outside and use a real APR respirator with the right cartridges. It is not hobby stuff.

I would highly recommend conversion varnish. It is not so noxious and dries very fast without skinning over. It is a very good way to seal a stock for an oil finish. Just sand back to the wood with 400 grit and apply your oil. Nobody can tell you did not apply a zillion coats of oil over a couple of months. In fact it can look much better. The zillion coats of oil can darken a stock too much and obscure the grain. By the way, spray can lacquer sanding sealer can be used for this too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the info guys. It was pretty dry when I took it out on Thursday and now is very close to being perfectly dry.

I'm going to thin it out a bit and stretch on a couple more coats that will hopefully dry up real nice.
 

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Quickshot said:
True oil has linseed oil in it and that can be a problem in drying.

I suggest you consider making your own hand rub finish of 1/4 pure tung oil, 1/4 marine spar varnish (alkyloyd), and 1/2 oderless mineral spirts.
Will this method darken the stock when applied? And if not does this dry any faster than Tru oil? I read somewhere in here that Shellac would make a good basecoat on older stocks. Any chance this would accelerate the dry time on wood that just seems to soak up the oil without ever getting a hard coating?
 

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Xerxes said:
Quickshot said:
True oil has linseed oil in it and that can be a problem in drying.

I suggest you consider making your own hand rub finish of 1/4 pure tung oil, 1/4 marine spar varnish (alkyloyd), and 1/2 oderless mineral spirts.
Will this method darken the stock when applied? And if not does this dry any faster than Tru oil? I read somewhere in here that Shellac would make a good basecoat on older stocks. Any chance this would accelerate the dry time on wood that just seems to soak up the oil without ever getting a hard coating?
The whole idea with oil finishes is to get the oil into the wood. The more that soaks in the better. It is sometimes maddening to keep applying coats of oil only to have them all soak in, but that is better than having them stay on the surface. Be patient. Let the coats of oil dry and harden before adding another. Dry to the touch does not mean hard!
BE PATIENT!! I can't emphasize this enough. If you let each coat dry eventually you will get a build of oil with a hard surface.
I have seen many oil wood finishing jobs botched because guys would steel-wool a soft (but dry to the touch) surface or used only 2 coats with a day in between and then waxed the surface.

Oil is very easy to use but it needs only one thing and that is extreme patience!

If you want a very fast job then you can seal with shellac, varnish, lacquer or anything. It might look good, but the oil is then all on the surface and none has soaked into the wood.

All my stocks (except for the Merkel) are oiled and they are all remarkably robust. Every once in a while I put another rubbed coat on them and they're good for another season. The Merkel stock had a varnish of some sort applied by the factory and altho it looks OK, in comparison to the real oiled stocks is inferior. I can't oil it because the varnish prevents the oil from penetrating - I shall have to strip it some day.

Frank
 
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