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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I visit many hunting sites on the net

I bought a small piece of property in a western state and planned to hunt on public land and what private land we can get permission on.

On this one site, I raised my thoughts on big pay hunting operations taking away oportunity for the folks who can't afford to pay the high rates of these operations. Also these operations are sucking up huge amounts of land from public accessability. When you take away opportunity, you drive people to other activities. Less people doing the sport, less of a voice we carry to Washington or our state capital

I got the, "I'm part of the problem" and that I should get out of the way.

Also, in so many words...I was told unless I buy enough land to hunt on or bring a thick wallet out. I'm not welcome.

Is this what our hunting is comming to?

IMO, I hope they put a stop to selling our game to the highest bidder. If not, we will end up like merry old England. Where the rich drove the average guy from the sport and thought their money & power would always carry them through.

They were wrong & the same people who once hunted, helped vote away their right to hunt their loved private exclusive untouchable(they thought) lands.

PAY HUNTING WILL BE THE DEATH OF OUR SPORT!!

More pubic access to huntable lands is where our future is
 

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If you want a lot of walk in public hunting look at Kansas for a state program to replicate.

Most counties have tons of walk in hunting and the money out of state hunters brings in helps a lot of people instead of just a few guides.
 

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I agree with what was said about Kansas. On opening weekend if you don't have reservations in any of the small town motels in pheasant country forget it. You won't be getting a room. When you go to eat breakfast opening morning you see a lot of orange hats. I went back to Kansas over the holidays. I still saw a lot of dog boxes in the motel parking lots. I spend a good part of my vacation time there every season as I am sure do a lot of other upland bird hunters from several states. They have the best public access program of any state I have ever hunted. No other state even comes close.
 

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Jiganator said:
More pubic access to huntable lands is where our future is
Just this evening, I read an article in a local paper that stated that Chuck Schummer (of all people) has introduced a farm bill that would distribute federal dollars to farmers that open their land to public access for hunting, fishing and birding!

Frank
 

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Frank Lopez Just this evening said:
Just proof positive that Chuck does not read the info that he introduces and votes on. Unfortunately, there are too many in office at all levels like that.
 

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Pay to hunt WILL be the death of the sport!! its that way in South Dakota for pheasants. the day of knocking a door to hunt are over!
 

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Up until recently I have never paid to hunt any property, some is private owned by friends and the rest is public. Now recently I joined a pheasant club for sportsman, fee was $20 a year and 5 land owners opened their property to the club to stock birds and give access to club members.

I have to admit this is heading in the direction of pay to hunt. The fee is small enough for the average guy to afford, and the club raises 600 pheasants for us to shoot. Roosters only like any public place, and normal daily bag limits apply. Here in Wisconsin its almost the only way to hunt pheasant, back in the 70's - 80's I remember hunting wild birds.

I work for a German company and like England that someone mentioned earlier its kind of the same way. You must rent land to hunt (expensive), own permits for your firearms (expensive), ammo is outrageous, and also special yearly shooting qualifications. We can only hope that none of this ever reaches our shores.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
kgpcr said:
Pay to hunt WILL be the death of the sport!! its that way in South Dakota for pheasants. the day of knocking a door to hunt are over!
It just so happens, the property I bought is out there & the people with poor aditudes are Pheasant guide/outfitters who visit the board.

Not to friendly..unless your waving cash in front of them.

I'll be happy just hunting some public hunting ground.
 

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Nebraska is heading down the road of pay to play. I have sen some of my favorite spots leased up by the Cabellas and other big operators. Most don't give a damn about anything but the money. I know several guys who run controlled shooting operations and most are just about as big a slobs and lawbreakers as you have ever seen. Some are pretty good but it pays to do your homework when booking hunts.

I'll second the thoughts on Kansas that is where I go and I live where it's suposed to be the best Pheasnt areas in nebraska.
 

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Hunting access has always been more about who you know than where you go.......

Nothing beats personal contacts no matter where you hunt.

I spent one week in ND last Summer and made several new friends. One of those friends (a nonhunter) got me onto 5 different private farms and ranches while I was there this past fall.
 

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Yes the best time to get access is in the off season. Banging on doors durring the season is not the best was especailly with out of state plates.

In Nebraska you can tell the county the plates are from so if it's from the same county or a close one they are usually a lot more willing.

I often get permission but am told well after the kids come back or not on this weekend or that weekend. I also make sure I leave no trash even clean up somone elses and don't overhunt a spot. I prefer public land no strings attached and it's just more satisfying to get birds where others have pounded it. Kansas just has so much access it's amazing.
 

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I prefer public land too. I would rather have a so-so hunt on public land than to have a good hunt after driving around begging for a private place to hunt like a salesman. I have had very good hunts on public land in 5 states.
 

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I'm with jiganator on this one. Go to Texas and try to hunt something, if you want to see the future. Wild game has become de facto the personal property of the landowner. My advice to anyone who expects to hunt, is to get several like-minded people together and buy your own hunting land, because one way or another you're going to pay. Might just as well be paying on a mortgage. Strangely enough, I haven't been able to interest any of MY friends in this tho.
 

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mmckie said:
I'm with jiganator on this one. Go to Texas and try to hunt something, if you want to see the future. Wild game has become de facto the personal property of the landowner. My advice to anyone who expects to hunt, is to get several like-minded people together and buy your own hunting land, because one way or another you're going to pay. Might just as well be paying on a mortgage. Strangely enough, I haven't been able to interest any of MY friends in this tho.
I think it still depends on the state. Texas has been known to be a closed state for hunting for as long as I can remember. On the other hand North Dakota is still pretty much accessible.

I own land in Georgia. All it has on it these days are turkey and deer. I get to hunt it perhaps once every 3 years and since I'm not there to watch it I'm sure many others hunt it much more than I do.
 

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The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is a hunter's paradise. We have huge tracts of State and National forest land and much of the private land is owned by logging companies with open access. There's a big tax break for keeping private land open to hunting, and most land owners take advantage of it.

You can literally drive a few miles out of town, pull off on nearly any two-track road, and start hunting. Hardly any land is fenced or posted unless it's right near someone's house.

We don't really have many pheasants, but the hunting for grouse, ducks, geese, whitetails, woodcock, and turkey is great.
 

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In Arkansas, the timber companies have leased almost all their land out to private clubs. However, the AR Dept of Game and Fish leased a lot of it 2 years ago and opened it up for public access. It really pissed off some of the clubs that lost their leases but it opened up a lot of hunting for those who can't afford to join a club.
 

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The clubs are so shortsighted in this respect. Lose all the hunters lose hunting.
 

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Bud Tugly said:
The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is a hunter's paradise. We have huge tracts of State and National forest land and much of the private land is owned by logging companies with open access.
Hey, Bud, put a lid on it, will ya? This is the best-kept hunting secret in the whole country. Let's keep it to ourselves! :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have this same thread going over on a Waterfowl site.

I have taken a beating

These southern duck hunters have come on there and been in full attack mode.

Leasing & pay hunting is the standard there. They invented it, along with Texans. The only way to even hunt there is own, leases or pay hunt. Very little public land. IMO, it's like they don't like anybody being able to free-lance hunt. VERY PROTECTIVE of their property.

Atleast I know there's NO reason to plan a trip there.
 

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From what I have read, some of them think they own public land and water too, if their private land butts up against it. I read some horror stories last month on another site about some jerks flying kites from their land to prevent other hunters that were legally on public land from hunting that area. Those kite flyers must be some real great Americans...

I have never paid to hunt for wild game. Paying to shoot some stocked pheasants, yes. But I don't consider that hunting. Ask permission, shoot the farmers groundhogs, offer services, maybe get them a gift certificate to a nice restaurant. But absolutely not "here is $1000 if I can hunt this land but you keep everyone else out". That is so wrong, I can't even describe it in words.

Jeremiah
 
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