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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I on my 3rd year of trapshooting, and after doing fairly well at 16 yards (3 25's, pretty consistent 22's & 23's), I'm now shooting 20 or 22 yards at various leagues. I seem to have trouble with the up/down aiming at the targets. At 16 yards with my 870TB, I put the front bead right on target, and it smokes. At 22 yards, I seem to be shooting over the bird with the same technique. Should I be adjusting my up/down aim at longer yardage? Or perhaps my gunfit is poor, causing my mid-teen scores? (there is quite a gap between the beads) Or, perhaps it is THAT much tougher 12-18 feet back? Any suggestions?
 

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Yes, I know exactly how you feel. Eventualy it will rub off on your 16 yd scores too. :cry: For me, I'm convinced it has to do with where in the rock's path I shoot. I'm not particularly fast in my target aquasition any more and I suspect on some targets I end up shooting over them because the rock has peaked out on it's flight and is falling by the time my shot gets there. I think I need to either shoot faster on all of them, (not likely) or let them all fall before shooting and give them more float before I do shoot. I'm still struggling myself! One team I shoot on won the club championship this last year. I told them that my main contribution is: "if it weren't for me, we would have had to shoot ALL our handicap targets from 27". But with MY score added in, they got to shoot from 24 and 25 instead! :wink: You may notice that when you DO crush a rock back at the fence, it is sometime longer between the time the gun goes BOOM and when the rock smokes than when you do it at 16. You got to allow for that time lag in your "sight picture". Shoot where the rock is going to be when the shot gets there, not where it is now! It is different than up close.

BP
 

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there wouldn't be any difference in hold as long as the bird is the same distance from the trap when you take it--are you waiting longer at 22 yards :?:

have a friend stand aside when you are shooting both yardages, see if that distance is different
 

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A gun is going to shoot higher the farther away a target is. Now, it may not be enough to change how much you float the bird but it is different.
 

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I don't think it is so much the gun shooting higher as it is that the rock is falling. But, that indeed could be far different between gun to gun comparisons. They are not all made the same, different geometry with barrels, ribs and stocks can do unusual things indeed. But generaly, a shotgun doesn't shoot far enough and the pattern is large enough that getting a theoretical higher point of impact the farther away the trarget is doesn't hold a lot of water. Now a rifle that shoots 1/4 mile with a scope mounted 1-3/4" above the bore and sighted in for 300 yd is a completly different tin of tuna!

BP
 

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To test your theory of too high would be to set the trap for straight away station 3 and shoot 3 shells at the 16 yard line and beginning backing up 1 yd after each 3 shots. Measure the hits. If you are shooting high the pieces of the targets will fly downward when hit. If by chance you are shooting low the target pieces will fly upward when hit. You should be able to see a change over the 8 yds of movement. Hopefully they are all centered and you decide that you just need to shoot the yardage just like the 16s. It isn't unusual for us trap shooters to take the yardage shooting too serious and aim instead of point and shoot. "Shoot yardage just like 16s".
 

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tripdog7 said:
At 16 yards with my 870TB, I put the front bead right on target, and it smokes. At 22 yards, I seem to be shooting over the bird with the same technique (there is quite a gap between the beads) Or, perhaps it is THAT much tougher 12-18 feet back? Any suggestions?
OK, if you are putting the bead right on the target at 16yds, your probably breaking the target with the lower portion of your pattern. Depending on your pattern, its probably "just" barely catching the target, but still enough to smoke it. With a large gap between your beads, it stands to reason that your hold is set up for a good pattern shooting over the bead. Thus the need to "float" the target over the bead. At 22 yards (and yes, it is that much tougher being 12-18feet back) as others suggested the bird may be level, or even dropping, so you would be "way" over the target.

Try floating the target, above the bead, or hold the gun so that the beads are in-line rather than the gapped figure 8, if you want to cover the target with your bead, as you are used to.

Just my take on it. :D
 

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"Shoot yardage just like 16s"
What he said is correct. Untill you get to the 23 or 24 yard line it is just like shooting 16's, its just messing with your head once you start getting back there. I have shot from 50 feet behind the 27 and been able to hit the birds fine with normal light loads. The bad thing about handicap in competition is people are always trying to hit the big money so thats on your mind alot. Thats not the case for me since I am a junior and get to pay half price if I dont play to options. Just keep the money and trophies out of your head untill your back at the fence.
 

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The best shooters in trap. The top guns that offer clinics, will generaly advise you to raise your point of impact as you earn yardage, 25 yards to the back fence. Your shot will start to drop and as the target get visually smaller by distance, it is more important to have the shotgun shoot higher. Allowing you to keep visual contact with the target though the shot process. Some will advise to have your POI at least 100% high to compensate shot drop and visual perception. "But" at the 20 or 22 yard line, shoot em like the singles. Don't change your form, your gun, your choke or your attitude. Simply crush the target. The only minor difference is...the move from the start position to target acquisition is less the farther back you stand. Don't jump at the target early because it farther away, stay smooth and follow through. Relax and stay smooth and follow through!

The more hadicap yardage, the more important it is to have your gun "in the center". You will also need more precision in your point. Work on centering first. This makes your gun feel forgiving. Like you can make minor pointing errors and still chunk the target. Handicap is rocket science compared to singles, but not at the 20.

Maltzie
 

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I agree with Maltzie. Your gun needs to shoot a bit higher at handicaps. If you are letting the target start to fall before shooting you are waiting too long to shoot.

Handicap trap is NOT the same game as 16 yd trap and the farther back you go the higher the POI should be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the advice. I am definetly pulling the trigger while the bird is still on the way up. If I float the target at 16 yards, it's a miss... I must bury the bird. The patterning board told me that the gun is 55/45, maybe 60/40... quite centered.
I'll just do what I do at 16 yards at 22 until I get things figured out. Those scores do hurt though, especially on a team league! (I do keep our squad closer though)
 

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60/40 will work on cap targets only if your timing breaks the bird on its peak while covering with the bead. Most shooters will trip the trigger earlier on caps than on singles, thereto be shooting a target that is more aggressively climbing. This requires a POI higher to center. Try adding one washer to the stock comb. Do not change anything with your form, anchor, or where and how you place your cheek on the stock. Just see the target clearly and move to it. A full choke will confirm where you are at with centering. Don't be happy until you can make dust bunnies on perfect shots.

Maltzie
 
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