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I have found that eyes open works a lot better than eyes closed ❗ 😂


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I find it curious that two-eyed shooting is considered de rigeur for shotgunning yet it seems that trying to do it that way is where so many shooters' problems begin and where so many articles are trying to help shooters to do it. Assuming that most folks leave something on the table with regard to using two eyes effectively, exactly how much worse could one-eyed shooting actually be? You aim at the target, you pull in front the amount needed for the appropriate lead and you shoot. What could be simpler? No mumbo-jumbo. No trying to look at the target while pointing the gun in front of it. Of course you have to know where to aim, either intuitively, subconsciously or consciously according to your skill and experience. But that is true no matter how many eyes you use. So many variables taken out of the process.
Significant fallacies in your quote regarding 2 eyed shooters. No and I mean ZERO successful SC shooters close one eye. That should be sufficient to answer your questions.
 

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Significant fallacies in your quote regarding 2 eyed shooters. No and I mean ZERO successful SC shooters close one eye. That should be sufficient to answer your questions.
Define successful. You know the joke about two guys being chased by a bear? One guy says he doesn't have to beat the bear, just the other guy. That is what we have here. Are you saying no one-eyed shooter is better than you? Seriously? On any given day that is all that is required to be a successful SC shooter. Based on you being the one who posted the above, someone who shoots one-eyed doesn't have to beat Gebben Miles. He just has to beat you. Besides, your facts are wrong.
 

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Define successful. You know the joke about two guys being chased by a bear? One guy says he doesn't have to beat the bear, just the other guy. That is what we have here. Are you saying no one-eyed shooter is better than you? Seriously? On any given day that is all that is required to be a successful SC shooter. Based on you being the one who posted the above, someone who shoots one-eyed doesn't have to beat Gebben Miles. He just has to beat you. Besides, your facts are wrong.
I would define successful in this game as a pro in the top 20 or 30. Or as an amateur who has reached, and can legitimately maintain master class in the NSCA. Of course I don't think that I can beat every one eyed shooter. Only most. I'm only in A class, BTW. How about You?
 

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Significant fallacies in your quote regarding 2 eyed shooters. No and I mean ZERO successful SC shooters close one eye. That should be sufficient to answer your questions.
One of my friends shoots with one eye and I am guessing he is one of the top shooters in the country.
 

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I would define successful in this game as a pro in the top 20 or 30. Or as an amateur who has reached, and can legitimately maintain master class in the NSCA. Of course I don't think that I can beat every one eyed shooter. Only most. I'm only in A class, BTW. How about You?
Kim Rhode is one pro who shoots with one eyes closed. sera is a Master class amateur who occludes his weak eye. I don’t propose to know a bunch of names. As for me, I am irrelevant. The truth is independent of my practice and results.
 

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Kim Rhode is a TRAP shooter. Totally different discipline. Sera may be a wonderful shooter, and I doubt he totally patches his non-dominant eye.

As for you, I consider you relevant as it is you who touts the advantages of one eyed aiming. Wasn't it you who had a free lesson with David Radulovich and poo pooed his methodology? Very few accomplished shooters agree with you. With that in mind, your personal success becomes relevant.
 

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Kim Rhode is a TRAP shooter. Totally different discipline. Sera may be a wonderful shooter, and I doubt he totally patches his non-dominant eye.

As for you, I consider you relevant as it is you who touts the advantages of one eyed aiming. Wasn't it you who had a free lesson with David Radulovich and poo pooed his methodology? Very few accomplished shooters agree with you. With that in mind, your personal success becomes relevant.
Very few accomplished shooters agree with David either. I did not criticize David's methodology as a technique for others to choose if they wish. I simply chose not to use it for myself, just like most other shooters. Very few shooters shoot like David does. And very few coaches teach David's method. It is really quite unique. I seriously doubt you shoot like he does. But, of course, that's okay and yet, I am wrong to do what others do and seek a different method that suits me.

All I said was that shooting with only one eye open eliminated all the vision problems reported by many two-eyed shooters. I know it makes you uncomfortable that someone doesn't support your way of doing things. Nothing I can do about that.
 

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I find it curious that two-eyed shooting is considered de rigeur for shotgunning yet it seems that trying to do it that way is where so many shooters' problems begin and where so many articles are trying to help shooters to do it. Assuming that most folks leave something on the table with regard to using two eyes effectively, exactly how much worse could one-eyed shooting actually be? You aim at the target, you pull in front the amount needed for the appropriate lead and you shoot. What could be simpler? No mumbo-jumbo. No trying to look at the target while pointing the gun in front of it. Of course you have to know where to aim, either intuitively, subconsciously or consciously according to your skill and experience. But that is true no matter how many eyes you use. So many variables taken out of the process.
The less challenging the target, the better one-eyed shooters will shoot it, generally. Try to hit wild game birds, or bunker trap targets, with the one-eyed aiming you describe and all I can say is, good luck.

While there are people who have trained themselves to be excellent shots with one eye occluded, like Kim Rhode, who wears tape on her left lens, good luck finding one winning in a pigeon ring. Misses by accomplished shooters are generally not from failure to put the shot-cloud where they wanted it, they are from failing to select the proper place for the shot-cloud to go. Reading the target is critical to the endeavor, and two eyes are better at reading a target than one is. People sometimes try to retain as much binocular vision of the target as possible by using as small a dot as possible, but most have the experience of their off-eye seeing "around" the dot and "taking over," causing them to cross-fire, as it is called, so they end up going to bigger and bigger dots, and thereby losing more and more binocularity. Also, even with a small dot you are losing that binocular vision at the worst possible time -- right before you trigger. Being able to read the target with both eyes all the way to the trigger-pull gives a distinct advantage.

I tried hard to make you method work for several years, and I got pretty good. But I had to watch as other novices would suddenly rocket past me in shooting ability. They could hit even very fast crossers, or take clays right off the trap arm, lightning-fast, something my (your) method did not allow. I said, "I want to be able to shoot like those guys."

It took years to get there, because aiming is a bad habit that is extremely hard to break, but I finally did. For me it is a vastly better way to shoot. What I do now is coach beginners to shoot "the good way" from Day One. Some of them go from novice to "extremely good" in a few years, something no barrel-watcher I have ever seen ever does.
 

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The less challenging the target, the better one-eyed shooters will shoot it, generally. Try to hit wild game birds, or bunker trap targets, with the one-eyed aiming you describe and all I can say is, good luck.

While there are people who have trained themselves to be excellent shots with one eye occluded, like Kim Rhode, who wears tape on her left lens, good luck finding one winning in a pigeon ring. Misses by accomplished shooters are generally not from failure to put the shot-cloud where they wanted it, they are from failing to select the proper place for the shot-cloud to go. Reading the target is critical to the endeavor, and two eyes are better at reading a target than one is. People sometimes try to retain as much binocular vision of the target as possible by using as small a dot as possible, but most have the experience of their off-eye seeing "around" the dot and "taking over," causing them to cross-fire, as it is called, so they end up going to bigger and bigger dots, and thereby losing more and more binocularity. Also, even with a small dot you are losing that binocular vision at the worst possible time -- right before you trigger. Being able to read the target with both eyes all the way to the trigger-pull gives a distinct advantage.

I tried hard to make you method work for several years, and I got pretty good. But I had to watch as other novices would suddenly rocket past me in shooting ability. They could hit even very fast crossers, or take clays right off the trap arm, lightning-fast, something my (your) method did not allow. I said, "I want to be able to shoot like those guys."

It took years to get there, because aiming is a bad habit that is extremely hard to break, but I finally did. For me it is a vastly better way to shoot. What I do now is coach beginners to shoot "the good way" from Day One. Some of them go from novice to "extremely good" in a few years, something no barrel-watcher I have ever seen ever does.
The above mimics my experience. In my infancy, I was asked by several good shooters why I was "jerky" and always trying to catch up to the target. The answer, obvious to me now, is that I would look at the beads to aim, then the target. And back and forth ad nauseam. Herky jerky miss. I still see the barrels, but just a little. 95% of my hard focus is on the target when I'm shooting well. I've picked up 10 to 15 birds since this revelation. When I flinch (still happens on occasion) I check the gap or look at that metal.
 

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The less challenging the target, the better one-eyed shooters will shoot it, generally. Try to hit wild game birds, or bunker trap targets, with the one-eyed aiming you describe and all I can say is, good luck.

While there are people who have trained themselves to be excellent shots with one eye occluded, like Kim Rhode, who wears tape on her left lens, good luck finding one winning in a pigeon ring. Misses by accomplished shooters are generally not from failure to put the shot-cloud where they wanted it, they are from failing to select the proper place for the shot-cloud to go. Reading the target is critical to the endeavor, and two eyes are better at reading a target than one is. People sometimes try to retain as much binocular vision of the target as possible by using as small a dot as possible, but most have the experience of their off-eye seeing "around" the dot and "taking over," causing them to cross-fire, as it is called, so they end up going to bigger and bigger dots, and thereby losing more and more binocularity. Also, even with a small dot you are losing that binocular vision at the worst possible time -- right before you trigger. Being able to read the target with both eyes all the way to the trigger-pull gives a distinct advantage.

I tried hard to make you method work for several years, and I got pretty good. But I had to watch as other novices would suddenly rocket past me in shooting ability. They could hit even very fast crossers, or take clays right off the trap arm, lightning-fast, something my (your) method did not allow. I said, "I want to be able to shoot like those guys."

It took years to get there, because aiming is a bad habit that is extremely hard to break, but I finally did. For me it is a vastly better way to shoot. What I do now is coach beginners to shoot "the good way" from Day One. Some of them go from novice to "extremely good" in a few years, something no barrel-watcher I have ever seen ever does.
Coach, the binocular vision argument is specious. Binocular vision is superior to monocular with regard to depth perception only at distances of about 100X the shooter's intraocular distance (distance between the pupils). That distance is about 100X 6 cm or 6 meters. So after 20 feet perspective and depth perception are about the same using one or two eyes. All shotgunning is done at greater distance than that. Look it up.
 

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The above mimics my experience. In my infancy, I was asked by several good shooters why I was "jerky" and always trying to catch up to the target. The answer, obvious to me now, is that I would look at the beads to aim, then the target. And back and forth ad nauseam. Herky jerky miss. I still see the barrels, but just a little. 95% of my hard focus is on the target when I'm shooting well. I've picked up 10 to 15 birds since this revelation. When I flinch (still happens on occasion) I check the gap or look at that metal.
Tell you what the difficulty for me is knowing when I’m being jerky or moving too far back for the second bird or whatever the fault may be. If I had film of all my shooting I’d probably advance a good bit quicker!
 

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Tell you what the difficulty for me is knowing when I’m being jerky or moving too far back for the second bird or whatever the fault may be. If I had film of all my shooting I’d probably advance a good bit quicker!
I did this a while back and had a friend who teaches and had him break down what he saw that I needed to change-work on and was a BIG help because I probably wouldn't have noticed things he did.
 

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The less challenging the target, the better one-eyed shooters will shoot it, generally. Try to hit wild game birds, or bunker trap targets, with the one-eyed aiming you describe and all I can say is, good luck.

While there are people who have trained themselves to be excellent shots with one eye occluded, like Kim Rhode, who wears tape on her left lens, good luck finding one winning in a pigeon ring. Misses by accomplished shooters are generally not from failure to put the shot-cloud where they wanted it, they are from failing to select the proper place for the shot-cloud to go. Reading the target is critical to the endeavor, and two eyes are better at reading a target than one is. People sometimes try to retain as much binocular vision of the target as possible by using as small a dot as possible, but most have the experience of their off-eye seeing "around" the dot and "taking over," causing them to cross-fire, as it is called, so they end up going to bigger and bigger dots, and thereby losing more and more binocularity. Also, even with a small dot you are losing that binocular vision at the worst possible time -- right before you trigger. Being able to read the target with both eyes all the way to the trigger-pull gives a distinct advantage.

I tried hard to make you method work for several years, and I got pretty good. But I had to watch as other novices would suddenly rocket past me in shooting ability. They could hit even very fast crossers, or take clays right off the trap arm, lightning-fast, something my (your) method did not allow. I said, "I want to be able to shoot like those guys."

It took years to get there, because aiming is a bad habit that is extremely hard to break, but I finally did. For me it is a vastly better way to shoot. What I do now is coach beginners to shoot "the good way" from Day One. Some of them go from novice to "extremely good" in a few years, something no barrel-watcher I have ever seen ever does.
Great post and great attached article, Coach. I coach young shooters too and have found exactly the same as you. I have one obviously talented shooter (he shoots pistol with USA Shooting), and the first time out shooting a shotgun, after going through the standard safety, stance, mount, etc. I took him to the sporting clay course. He was hitting straightforward targets, but understandably missing on more complex presentations. I reminded him "you are keeping both eyes open, right?". He wasn't. His pistol training was taking over and he was aiming down the barrel, trying to calculate the lead. I went through with him the discussion of the subconscious similar to your article. and he agreed to try it and trust it. He completely ran the next few stations, and laughing said "I can't believe that worked!". Now, when he misses, I remind him and it's always due to him shooting one-eyed.

I think your article nails it. Some people who want immediate solutions and answers aren't willing to put in the work to build up the mental inventory of shots to trust their subconscious. It takes commitment, hard work, and trust in something that can seem mysterious but has been proven over and over again. Even in my own shooting, when I can exclude every other visual or mental input besides complete focus on the target, the subconscious knows where to put the gun, even in some cases making last second, subtle adjustments for wind that I never could have made had I tried to "think" about it.

Great work with your young shooters!
 

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Great post and great attached article, Coach. I coach young shooters too and have found exactly the same as you. I have one obviously talented shooter (he shoots pistol with USA Shooting), and the first time out shooting a shotgun, after going through the standard safety, stance, mount, etc. I took him to the sporting clay course. He was hitting straightforward targets, but understandably missing on more complex presentations. I reminded him "you are keeping both eyes open, right?". He wasn't. His pistol training was taking over and he was aiming down the barrel, trying to calculate the lead. I went through with him the discussion of the subconscious similar to your article. and he agreed to try it and trust it. He completely ran the next few stations, and laughing said "I can't believe that worked!". Now, when he misses, I remind him and it's always due to him shooting one-eyed.

I think your article nails it. Some people who want immediate solutions and answers aren't willing to put in the work to build up the mental inventory of shots to trust their subconscious. It takes commitment, hard work, and trust in something that can seem mysterious but has been proven over and over again. Even in my own shooting, when I can exclude every other visual or mental input besides complete focus on the target, the subconscious knows where to put the gun, even in some cases making last second, subtle adjustments for wind that I never could have made had I tried to "think" about it.

Great work with your young shooters!
Very interesting. Please tell us how you coach him to push the gun ahead of the target when he is looking with two eyes only at the target. If the gun is mounted with his strong eye over the rib and he looks directly at the target, how does the gun not shoot behind the target but rather manufacture the lead his "mental inventory" tells him he needs? No question we know it happens, but what mechanism to make it happen do you teach? How does it happen?
 

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Coach, the binocular vision argument is specious. Binocular vision is superior to monocular with regard to depth perception only at distances of about 100X the shooter's intraocular distance (distance between the pupils). That distance is about 100X 6 cm or 6 meters. So after 20 feet perspective and depth perception are about the same using one or two eyes. All shotgunning is done at greater distance than that. Look it up.
You're talking theory. In the real world nobody's eyes work flawlessly 100% of the time. We get little "twitches and glitches" that throw our focus off at times. It one of those hits you when you are seeing with only one eye, you just lost the bird. For a 2-eyed shooter, the image from the other eye carries the ball.

Also, the subconscious uses BOTH images to aim the shotgun, not just the one over the rib. Using both is not only a backup for the main one, but also provides a more accurate interpretation of what the target and the gun are doing.
 

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Great post and great attached article, Coach. I coach young shooters too and have found exactly the same as you. I have one obviously talented shooter (he shoots pistol with USA Shooting), and the first time out shooting a shotgun, after going through the standard safety, stance, mount, etc. I took him to the sporting clay course. He was hitting straightforward targets, but understandably missing on more complex presentations. I reminded him "you are keeping both eyes open, right?". He wasn't. His pistol training was taking over and he was aiming down the barrel, trying to calculate the lead. I went through with him the discussion of the subconscious similar to your article. and he agreed to try it and trust it. He completely ran the next few stations, and laughing said "I can't believe that worked!". Now, when he misses, I remind him and it's always due to him shooting one-eyed.

I think your article nails it. Some people who want immediate solutions and answers aren't willing to put in the work to build up the mental inventory of shots to trust their subconscious. It takes commitment, hard work, and trust in something that can seem mysterious but has been proven over and over again. Even in my own shooting, when I can exclude every other visual or mental input besides complete focus on the target, the subconscious knows where to put the gun, even in some cases making last second, subtle adjustments for wind that I never could have made had I tried to "think" about it.

Great work with your young shooters!
Thanks very much, Eric, and good luck answering fof's question! ;)

The other proof of what you said is the many times I have seen a brand new shooter show up and shoot amazingly well, and then 6 months later they are not hitting half as many birds as they did that first day. They are frustrated, and know they are not shooting nearly as well, but they have no idea why.

You could tell easily tell them why. I do if they ask.
 

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Thanks very much, Eric, and good luck answering fof's question! ;)
Are you suggesting that you can’t answer a simple question like that yourself?
You're talking theory. In the real world nobody's eyes work flawlessly 100% of the time. We get little "twitches and glitches" that throw our focus off at times. It one of those hits you when you are seeing with only one eye, you just lost the bird. For a 2-eyed shooter, the image from the other eye carries the ball.

Also, the subconscious uses BOTH images to aim the shotgun, not just the one over the rib. Using both is not only a backup for the main one, but also provides a more accurate interpretation of what the target and the gun are doing.
Of course you are discounting the complication of two different images running along the barrel, a problem the one-eyed shooter doesn’t have. With one eye there is no confusion caused by intrusion of the barrel into the picture at all.

You have brought up some new concepts in favor of using two eyes, but you have not addressed the fact that the most commonly given reason for using both eyes, better depth perception, is false.
 

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Are you suggesting that you can’t answer a simple question like that yourself?
No, but you appeared to be asking Eric the question. If you want to read how I do it, read my blog article. The process is fairly involved and I have already typed it once. :)

Of course you are discounting the complication of two different images running along the barrel, a problem the one-eyed shooter doesn’t have. With one eye there is no confusion caused by intrusion of the barrel
A more accurate depiction would be that with one eye the barrel is almost never NOT intruding into the picture, though there are exceptions, like most of the one-eyed Olympic competitors.

You have brought up some new concepts in favor of using two eyes, but you have not addressed the fact that the most commonly given reason for using both eyes, better depth perception, is false.
Yes, I have never really bought the "depth perception" argument myself. However, in low light a shooter can have a very difficult time seeing a target at all, and the shooter trying to see it with only one eye will be at an ever bigger disadvantage.
 
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