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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've decided to start shooting 410 again for sporting clays :D and I have about 16# of WC820 left over. I'm setting up a new PW conversion. I had written down some "load data" on one of my jugs and want to make sure that I have my old "data" correct and those of you that still use WC820 feel it's a "safe load". I know, you can't guarantee that the load is safe (insert your own disclaimer) but, if you guys are loading the same amount of powder, it'll make me feel better.

My bushing throws 14.5gr and I'm using 2 1/2" AAHS hulls, CB HS wads, Fiocchi 616 primers, 1/2 oz 8.5's. I had written down that 14.4gr = ~1270 fps.

It's been about 8 years since I've loaded 410's and my memory isn't quite what it used to be :eek:
 

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I am using 14.3 WC820 with a WW209 and everything else is the same as yours. There is a long thread about it under "Top Threads " at the top of the reloading section. Your Fio primers will not be as consistent

Sent from my Kindle Fire using Tapatalk 2
 

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PW in 410, touch base with John or myself if you have not been following our threads on tweaking the PW machine to solve powder migration problems and make the machine run like a dream in 410!!!

Improved Powder seal/bushing mods are almost mandatory to resolve the small grain powder migration problems, as well doing the mag insert on the hull seating post so you don't have to wait for the hull to settle before you can cycle the machine.

To get room between the wad ram and wad guide so the ram does not catch the top of the wad when you have the ram set to make the wad kiss the powder on insert, shim the inner wad ram down in the outer assembly with a O ring.

Finished shell knock out's without distorting the top of the sizer exposed hulls, polish the sizers so the ID's are gleaning, and add on a cleaning mop to the machine to keep the sizers fouling free to begin with.

Trust us, 20 mins up front doing the small mod's to get the machine ready for 410 with small grain ball powder, will save you a lifetime of migraines without such.
 

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Jim, here you go with PW mods for 410 all in the same place.

Lets start from the base and work up.
First off, inserting a magnet into the hull insertion post so the hull does not rock and you have to wait to cycle the machine.

The magnet I use is the Grade N42, disc 3/8" by 1/8" and having a lathe makes short work of this. Star of by chucking the hull inserting post in the lathe and center it so it running true. On the tail stock, add a chuck, and install a 3/8" center plunging end mill in the tail end chuck. Touch off the end mill to the face of the hull seating post, and zero out the dial or DRO for the tail stock. The magnet is .126" thick, we want the surface of the magnet to sit .006 recessed in the face of the hull post so the magnet only stops the hull from rocking, but that magnet does not have enough force to pull the hull back out of the sizer. Also, we will be gluing the magnet in place with fast setting tow part epoxy, so throw in a few more thousands for epoxy below the magnet and the channel as well (read you can always face the seating post afterwards if the recess is too much, but not the other way around since the magnet is going to destroy a end mill if you try to cut into it).

So .126 for the magnet + .006 for magnet face to recess below the top of the face of the post, +.004 for the epoxy to be on the safe side, and we are going to plunge channel the face of the hull seating post .136 with the 3/8 end mill. Once you have the chance plunged, just back the tail stock back since your going to be using it again. Take some 400 sand paper and every so gently, remove any ridge burs that the end mill causes with the seating post still turning , and give the channel to face edge about a .001 radius. Now break out Q tips and acetone, and clean up the channel of any cutting grease and debris so we can glue the degreased/debris magnet it place.

Again, two part fast setting epoxy is a good choice, and you don't need a lot of it. so just a light coat in the channel bottom and sides, drop the magnet in the channel, then bring the end mill back in place without the lathe chuck spinning to force the magnet all the way down into the channel and force out the excess epoxy from below it. Break out the acetone and Q-tips again, and clean epoxy from the top of the magnet and end mill, and by the time you have pulled the end mill and chuck out of the machine and put them away, you can go back and double check the magnet to insure that you have it recessed about .006 before the face of the post, and even do a post face cut if needed if the magnet is recessed too deep .


Sizers, the brand new sizers can be semi rough inside, but worse yet, the ID to top edge very sharp, which want to bite into the hull as it being ejected out of the sizers. With a lathe, you use a brake cylinder horning tool to clean up the inside of the sizers and just use 400 sand paper to raduis the ID to top edge about .001 when the sizers are spinning.

Without a lathe, then it gets a little harder.
To polish the inside of the sizers, SS wool wrapped around a nylon brush on the end of a cleaning rod in a hand drill to do spinning plunge/pull strokes instead. Same as using a lathe, you not trying to remove ID channel milling lines for a glass interior surface, but instead, your just trying smooth out the tops of the milling produced grooveing/chatter. As for breaking the ID surface to top of sizer edge, use a dowel with tape build on it to fit tightly in the sizers so you can just spin the entire sizer on a drill, and use the 400 sandpaper to .001 radius the edge like I do on the lathe.


Lowering the inner wad guide down in the outer guide so the ram will not tag/catch the wad as it cam's back over since you need to set the ram petty low to kiss the wad to the powder.
#12 O ring around the top of the inner wad guide before it put back in the outer wad guide. Also, if you have an older machine with the round O rings (not the square ones round that the new Plus machines use), they are #12 as well, so with a pack of then for around $3 from home depot, you can change then out at will when you are clean the top end of the machine.


We just spent time cleaning and polishing the sizers, so let's keep the clean as we are reloading on the machine as well. The new plus machine tool head has a socket that will accept the PW cleaning rod on the bottom of the tool head, so on these machines with the socket, just pick up the PW cleaning rod, and install a mop on it long enough that when the cross plate is all the way up, the bottom of the mop slightly clears the bottom of the sizer. My cleaning agent to use on the mop, a hint of BreakfreeCLP since it mostly a cleaning agent anyways.
If you have a older machine without the cleaning rod socket on the bottom of the tool head, then the cleaning rod can be attached via a plate, on the older B machines, you can just drill the tool head for a through bolt instead, or PW sells a clamp on cleaning kit for these machines as well.



Ok, solving fine grain powder migration at the top end.
Out the gate, your going to end up converting a powder bushing gear to a dedicated assembly, plan and simple. The problem here is no matter how well you flush a bushing out to gear, your still going to end up with a gap that it going to allow powder to drop into that gap to get past any seal.

The solution, once you have the bushing ID sized correctly for the needed drop and flush out to the gear, epoxy the bushing into the gear so there is no edge gaps. Either this, or you make a bushing gear with the ID channel instead

With the gear to bushing seamless, let's move onto the hopper plate.
If you have a new plus machine with the squared edge O ring, you may luck out and not need to improve that seal, but don't bank on it.
First off, in 410 with any small grain powder, you are never going to have a powder bushing with an ID large than .300, so there is no reason that the powder drop channel to the bushing has to be much larger that .300 as well. The smaller the surface area of the powder drop channel to the bushing, the easier it is to control the powder from getting past the seal. John idea to solve this, was to deepen the O ring channel in the hopper plate and install a Nylon washer on the bottom of the O ring to create the seal. I liked the idea, but just seem that keeping the nylon washer in place in the recess as you where installing a plate maybe a little time consuming, plus you had to mod the plate as well. I took a different approach, and instead came up with a insert that uses the plate un-mod'd.
Note here, PW is not consistent on the hopper plate ID channels, so each plate will need a one off seal to fit it correctly. I tried to make a few seal for guys without their plates in hand, and most ended up have to re-lathe the OD upper sections down to fit their plated afterwards.
The upper section of the new seal is made .001" smaller OD than the channel it seats in, while the O ring for tension rides in a channel in the insert. On the insert O ring, the O ring does not depend on the top of the plate O ring channel for overall pressure, but instead uses the edge of the upper channel for seal pressure instead. The O ring sits in a groove, and via teflon tape to shallow the O ring groove in the insert, you can adjust the tension of the seal to the Top of the gear since the deeper you allow the channel to be in the seal for the O ring , the more that the O ring can just compress into it to lessen the downward tension. It may seem dumb to do it this way, but as the bottom of the gear wears in say 40K round, you don' t have to make anther seal, and instead just add another wind of Teflon tape to the bottom of the O ring channel in the seal to increase the seal tension to now slightly lower gear in the gear housing.




And the amount of that I free set seal to apply to the gear that I use via the Teflon tape adjusted O ring groove. Again, the #12 O ring is not fully compressing top to bottom, but inwards in the seal channel off the inner edge of the O ring channel in the plate instead. So the tension amount of the seal equals that of what a standard O ring would apply to the top of the plate instead. It looks deceiving, but once you understand that the O ring is not being tight space compressed only up and down, but has room to expand in the seal O ring channel as well, then you understand why this much depth compression of the top plate being bolted back down does not lead up to a huge amount of pressure.


Also to point out, this seal in installed in a old style hopper plate, but the same design will work just as well in the new square O ring low profile hopper plates too. You just end up with the top OD is just thinner walled to work in the Upper narrower channel and don't worry about the top of the new insert seal having to come all the way up to top of the powder plate drop channel like it does in these photo's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the tips Dano. I did the wad o ring and it works great! That one mod alone cut my time in half by allowing me to actually load and quit fussing with those tiny wads.

I'll have to study up on your powder mod and see if it's feasible for me to do. I may have to send you a pm or two if I decide to tackle it.

I don't have any issues with hulls wobbling so, I think I can skip that one for now.

At this time, the machine it's doing a GREAT job with the 410's.
 

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mooster1223 said:
Thanks for all the tips Dano. I did the wad o ring and it works great! That one mod alone cut my time in half by allowing me to actually load and quit fussing with those tiny wads.

I'll have to study up on your powder mod and see if it's feasible for me to do. I may have to send you a pm or two if I decide to tackle it.

I don't have any issues with hulls wobbling so, I think I can skip that one for now.

At this time, the machine it's doing a GREAT job with the 410's.
Trust me, the mag insert on the hull insertion post is a must.

With brand new once fired hulls, it keeps the hulls cleanly in line with the sizer above (wobbless) so you don't run into slightly crushing the mouths when they load into the sizers since the mouths are wide open.

When you get to the point that you are pushing the new hull up into the sizers to make sure that they load into the sizers right, instead of putting the hull on the insertion post instead, you will want the magnet mod.

The pushing the hulls up into the sizers happens about the same time you are trying to figure out why the machine is splitting the hull mouths when you are inserting a wad on brand new once fired hulls, even through you know for sure that you have the wad assembly set dead center on the hull (problem is happening way back at the hull insertion station, with the new once fired hull not feeding cleanly into the center of the sizers, due to a slight hull wobble as the cross plate come down, with an edge of the hull mouth catching the sizer off to one side since it every so slighlty wobbling as the cross plate comes down).

Plus, you think that you are getting the hulls on the hull insertion post fast now, you don't have a clue. With the magnet, get the hull close to the top of the insertion post cup, and they get sucked right down to stand there firmly and proud, with a Gail wind or you clubbing on the side of the machine not able to rock the hull on the insertion post.

For this reason alone, all my machines/ gauges got magnets installed in the hull insertion posts since I really don't need to look the hull insertion post as I load a hull on it (just get the hull close in the general area and the magnet will do the rest of the work) and can low fly reloading 410 quickly as well, since no fear of the hull every rocking to cause a miss feed into the sizer (why guys slow down when reloading 410's).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've developed a frustrating issue. When seating the wads, I am tearing the mouth of the shells. The Feed petals fit in to the mouth of the case but, when the wad pops in to the mouth, the guide seems to kick to the side and this occurs.



The hulls are not getting the mouth deformed in the seating stage so, that is not a contributor. This is happening on hulls that are being loaded for the second time. Of course, the PW will not tolerate a split in the crimp so, the hulls are basically worthless at this point...
 

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Really getting tied of loosing posts on this site. This is the second time in the same topic that I have hit submit, and lost an entire reply by having to re-logon.
So again, let retype it all over.

Start off be removing the inner wad guide, pull the wad fingers lock ring, and pull the wad guide.

With parts in hand, bent the end of inner guide springs end coils slightly outwards. The will prevent the end of coil from slipping over the coil below it to cause spring bind down the line.

Take the fingerless inner wad guide, and round the bottom channel edge of it so it radius about .003", hence not sharp as shown in your photo. When the guide comes down, it can not catch on a hull fold slightly flared out to start to drive the wad through the fingers before hull has seated against the inner O ring in the guide. Simply, the wad should not even begin to pass through the wad fingers until the top of the hull mouth is seated firmly against the O ring in the lower channel

Put the inner guide back together and now dry fit the inner guide to the main assembly. If needed, break out some 400 sandpaper and clean up the pass through ring in the main guide assembly so the inner assembly does not bind up in any fashion as it moving up and down in the outer assembly.

Go ahead and reinstall the inner wad guide back into the outer assembly without any lube and give the top of the inner assembly a couple of finger taps downward. The inner guide should move (dance) very easy in the outer assembly, just with spring pressure returning it back up.

Now remove the wad ram, and the primer tray and chute from the primer assembly. Loosen the left main rod top large Allen bolt, remove the left main rod base outer crush set small Allen set screws front and back, then loosen the inner set screws.

Handle all the way down to cam the wad guide above a hull in the sizer below, and now since you can rotate the entire left main guide rod in the base/top plate, set the wad guide dead center over the hull (between the two end points of the guide rod index pin slop in the left main rod slot). One you go to re-tighten up the left main rod, start with the top bolt, then the base inner set screws, followed by the outer set screw ram nuts. If you start with the base set screw first, the it will just rotate the left main rod back to of index since the set screws will just try to reset in the old dents they made in the lower taper section of the rod base.

Now on the wad ram, I'm telling right from the start that the tip end of the wad ram is not true with its threads, so we are going to need to tweak it. Get the depth of the wad ram set first, then we are going to tweak the wad ram in line with the wad guide below it.

I have a long rod with a hole milled in it to tweak the wad ram straight to index it with the center line of the inner guide, but you can use the hole in the end of a crescent wrench instead. Tweak/tension the wad ram up at the end of the threaded section to true the lower end with the center of the now tuned wad guide assembly.

To sum it up, we have the inner wad guide now end of channel edge rounded so it will not catch a hull mouth slightly flared out as it being pushed down, have guide centered of the hull, the inner guide not binding up on the outer guide assembly, and the wad ram centered on the whole assembly as well.

If you still have problems with the was rod not staying center line of the wad guide assembly as you handle all the way down, then we need to go all the way back the beginning of a tune, and that is to correctly set the cylinder to the center index hub so the cylinder/sizers are all centered below and above the center line of the tool seating channels to begin with.

Let me know if you need photos if I have lost you along the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Dano523 said:
Let me know if you need photos if I have lost you along the way.
I finally found some time to get out and look at the press and I'm a bit ashamed to admit that I'm lost already... :oops:

Dano523 said:
Now remove the wad ram, and the primer tray and chute from the primer assembly. Loosen the left main rod top large Allen bolt, remove the left main rod base outer crush set small Allen set screws front and back, then loosen the inner set screws.
I know where the large bolt is but, I can't figure out where the "outer crush" and the "front and back" allen screws are.

Dano523 said:
Now on the wad ram, I'm telling right from the start that the tip end of the wad ram is not true with its threads, so we are going to need to tweak it. Get the depth of the wad ram set first, then we are going to tweak the wad ram in line with the wad guide below it.

I have a long rod with a hole milled in it to tweak the wad ram straight to index it with the center line of the inner guide, but you can use the hole in the end of a crescent wrench instead. Tweak/tension the wad ram up at the end of the threaded section to true the lower end with the center of the now tuned wad guide assembly.
Once I get the "guide centered" above the hull and move on to the above step, do I leave the wad guide in place when I "tweak" the wad ram? (I will be using the back of an adjustable wrench) I should also add that these mods are being performed on an 800+.

Maybe a picture or three would be the best...

Thanks, Jim
 

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The left main rod is retained in the base socket via two inner small set screws, then on top of the inner set screws, there are two more outer set screws that are used as jam set screws.

So remove the front and back small set screws on the base for the left main rod, then loosen the inner set screws from and back about three winds. At this point, with the top main rod large allen bolt loosened, the entire left main rod can be rotated to align the entire wad guide to the sizers (index of the left main rod slot to the machine, since the wad assembly cam bolt rides in that track).

On the wad ram, handle down a tad so the wad assembly cams over and the tip of the wad ram just starts to enter the inner guide. Now take a look on the tip of the wad ram to how it entering the inner wad guide. Next take the handle all the way down and take a look at the center line of the wad ram to sizer below.

Now before you do anything, we are going to rotate the wad ram 90* in the tool head and check again. If the wad ram is bent, then rotating the rod in the tool head should change the direction of the wad ram off center for both positions.
Note:If you have a lathe, then just chuck the wad ram in it, and check it to see if the ram is straight, and if not true ,then true it from the start.

Center for both is the game plan here, so if the tip and center of sizer changed, then we know that we have a bent rod and it needs to be trued. Here if you did not lathe straighten the wad ram before, with the handle back down and the wad ram reset to the old depth position, use the tool to tweak the wad ram to center it/straight in while bolted in the tool head.

But lets go a step farther, and rotating the wad ram in the tool head did not change a thing, hence rod is straight, but the cylinder/sizers are not true indexed center line of tools instead.

Here, we need to center out the cylinder/sizers to the tools since it the problem at hand.

Start by loosing the wad ram assembly main cam bolt, and with hand pressuring the wad ram to one side (tip of the cam bolt tight against a side of the slot) loosen the index bolt just enough so the tip of the index bolt just clears the slot, but not enough that tip of the index bolt clears the nylon shim inside the wad guide assembly. Once the tip of the bolt just clears the left main rod slot, spin the wad guide assembly around to the left hand side of the machine without loosing the index bolt any more.

Now on the cylinder, there are two side channels, so loosen the set screws that hold the cylinder to the center hub in the side channel holes.
Note here, on older machines, there was a set of inner and outer set screws, while the newer plus machines just have inner set screws alone.

With the cylinder loose from the center hub, turn the cylinder one station either way against the statuary center hub so the set screws have fresh steel to bite into when they are tightened. Now handle up slowly and make sure that the wad ram guide enters into the sizer correctly (wad guide assembly is off to the side out of play so we don't have to worry about it). Now center the sizer center of the wad ram, and tighten up the cylinder set screws. Take the handle back down, spin the wad guide assembly back around, and hand tighten the cam bolt back up into the left main rod shaft slot. Note here, if the bolt will not spin back in by hand, you lost the index of the wad guide index bolt to the nylon shim void for it by backing the index bolt out too much. If this happens, then pull the bolt, break a flash light, and using a small pick tool, rotate the nylon shim inside the guide so it realigns its void to the cam both thread channel.

With the wad guide assembly back in action, loose the left main shaft again from the base and tool plate and now align the wad guide assembly to the rod again.

To point out, if you do have to re index the cylinder to the center hub, then you need to go back and check all the other tools. Most of the tools are easy to center since you just loosen up the tool head set screw for them, and hold the tool center of sizers as you tighten up the set screws back up. The crimper is easy as well, since you just need to loosen the crush bolt above the tool head, loosen the side tool head in the back for the crimper sleeve in the tool channel, then handle down so the tool self centers on the sizer and tighten the tool head set screw, then top crush nut back up afterwards.

Let me now if this make it clear, or if you still need photos.
 

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P.S. looking at the above photo and the wad ram and powder drop tube to the hulls, it does look like the cylinder needs to be reindexed on the center hub about a degree or two, counter clock wise.

So on that note, just spin the entire wad ram assembly out of the way on the left main rod as pointed out above so you don loose index of the index bolt to the nylon shim, and reindex the cylinder on the center hub so the sizers are centering on the tools from the start.

Once you have that cleaned up, then re-index the wad guide to the sizer afterwards.
 

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The magnet in the seating post is a wonderful thing. I was doing the stuff the hull up into the die trick - which means you can't use the cleaning brush. I think the cleaning brush is mandatory for the .410. Some like a CLP treated mop - I prefer a bronze bore brush. The bronze brush not only removes crud - but it polishes the die over time and makes for way less issues at the hull knock out station.

I do a slightly different magnet mod than Dano523 does. I use an 8 mm dia 3 m thick neodymium disk magnet set slightly below flush to the post. I counterbored the top of the post to a diameter slightly larger than the base of a primer so the seating post only contacts the hull and not the primer, that counterbore is maybe 1/32" deep or so. Then I drilled in the disk magnet and set it roughly flush to the counterbore. It was a tight fit in the hole and I didn't even bother to epoxy it in place.

For powder migration I epoxied the powder bushing into the powder gear and flattened the top surface on a piece of plate glass and wet/dry paper. I use an aluminum base plate for the easy fill hopper for the .410 - I took out the o-ring powder seal and cut the o-ring counterbore deeper by about 1/8". Then I put the o-ring back in and then I fit a 1/8" nylon washer to the counterbore. The o-ring now acts as a spring to keep the nylon washer pressed down to the powder gear. I get ZERO powder leakage with WC820 or W296/H110.
 

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Bringing this thread back to life, as it might have the answers to my powder migration on a 800 plus. I have just started loading Vectan Prima SV, which is fairly fine-grained, and I'm experiencing significant powder migration.

My 800 plus has the plastic top plate. Will the methods described by Dano and John still work, or do I need the aluminum top plate.

I noticed that PW now offers an EZ-Seal top plate that is designed to deal with the powder migration issue.
https://www.reloaders.com/collections/a ... -top-plate

Does anybody have any experience with this item, and how it performs relative to the fixes from Dano and John?
 

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The EZ-Seal top plate is just the ticket, and does the same as my insert with O ring to add tension instead.

If push comes to shove and you still have a migration problem, then I can lathe you up a new spring insert for that plate, or just a nylon insert to add to the factory insert with a smaller OD if needed to resolve any last migration problem.

Hence both my and Johns tweaks where first to get a good power cutter that would not allow migration to begin with (better than just an O ring), and to reduce the ID of the channel so less powder was in play across the surfaces as well. In 410, the ID bushing size you use up using is less than .300", so you don't want the ID of the funnel channel above the powder bushing being much larger that that as well.

P.S, Glad to see that PW is paying attention to owner mods on the machines, and coming up needed factory improvements as well!!!!

Not sure on the ID of the insert, but if larger than needed, lot easier to add just an nylon type insert on the factory insert that could be pushed in place, then to have to lathe up something that some guys may not have lathes isntead.
Note, when you get it, mic the ID of the insert channel and post it. For 410 loads, ideally, the ID channel will be in the .310" rang, and as stated, push comes to shove, nylon reducer in the bottom end of the insert would solve the problem. Hell push comes to shove, would have been nice for the insert to have two bottom pieces that you could thread into it instead. Hence once with a ID of .310 reducer for 410 loading, and then a larger one for the larger gauges isntead.

 

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Dano, Thanks for the insights. I guess my current plastic top plate is not robust enough to make further mods on. You convinced me that the EZ-Seal top plate is the way to go. I'm currently focusing on developing loads with the Vectan Prima powders for 7/8 oz load, 12 gauge, so may not run into your concern of powder migration due to the insert opening being larger than the powder bushing ID. I can certainly get you the ID of the insert channel when I get the EZ-Seal.

I will eventually get back into 410, and see how well this setup performs with W296. In an unrelated note, I have a 900 Elite tooling in 410 and need to get the necessary parts to convert this to a 800 plus 410 tooling kit. I haven't checked with PW on the pricing yet, to see whether this is cost-effective.
 

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The larger drop ID of the insert should be fine for 12 gauge, since your going to be using a much larger powder bushing in 12.

As for the 900, you will be doing tool head tooling swaps, and not swapping out the entire tool head like you would on a 800.
Note, grated that you could get a 900 tool head and do swaps with it, but it gets a little tricky pulling the 900 head head, since you have to remove the center hub indexer bolt and sleeve to pull the entire tool head out with center rod. Hence when you pull the tool head with center rod, you have to semi hold the cylinder is place since it can drift when retained by the two side secure lugs before you load the new tool plate with center lug back in place to hold the cylinder in the correct postion (so you don't lose the indexing ball in the block on the bottom of the cross plate). So with some measuring tools and O rings to swap tools in the tool plate, it's just faster to swap the tools out in the tool head from gauge to gauge on the 900, then is it to change the entire tool head on a 800 isntead.

Truth is, when I was doing tool changes on my 900 tool head from gauge to gauge, it only took me about 4 mins, and was faster than changing out a 800 tool heads, since I didn't have to unbolt the primer tray and chute from the primer assembly each time swapping tool plates isntead.

As for when you decide to start loading 410 on the 900, let me know and can give you hand on doing the needed mods, including making you a new smaller ID channel insert for new hopper plate as well.
 

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I went ahead and picked up the EZ-Seal top plate and had a chance to try it out. After loading 100 shells with Vectan Prima SV, I removed the top plate to do an inspection and did not notice powder migration. There is a square o-ring at the bottom of the slider tube which provides a nice seal against the powder bushing and gear. The ID of the o-ring is 0.500 (ID of the slider tube = 0.512), so the powder drop opening is still larger than the PW F2 powder bushing I'm using (0.399).

This is a very limited test, but so far, I'm satisfied with the EZ-Seal top plate.

Good job PW! {hs#
 
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