Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am about to go and shoot a round or two of sporting clays and last time i did vary poorly and hope to improve. i am going to swicth guns this time i am going to use my 870 instead of my 1100 my 870 will take chokes my 1100 will not. so what choke do i use and what kind do i get and were can i get one cheap and quickly what is a Lewis class. is this a good deal and should i take the class.

my shoot is at

Twin Lake Gun Club
3180 Duff Road, Twin Lake, Mi
June 14-28 July 12-26
10:00am to 3:00pm
$15.00 - 10 Stations, 50 Targets
Optional Lewis Class $5.00
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
It's not so much a matter of which choke to use as it is knowing what pattern is produced by each choke you own.

A 30" pattern is an ideal pattern size for a 12ga breaking clays. At 21 yards (average skeet shot) a skeet choke would be used to produce that size pattern. If you approach a sporting clays station where the shot is a 21 yard shot use a skeet choke. If the shot is a 40 yard shot you will likely have to use at least a modified shoke.

The key is knowing what choke you have in your bag that produces a 30" pattern at 40 yards. The only way to know that is to take a roll of paper to the range and pattern your gun with each choke you own at various ranges each. A modified choke in one gun may be different than a modified choke in another. No one can say with any certainty what your gun will do with each choke.

At very minimum you should have improved, modified, and full, and know what size pattern each will produce at various ranges.

That's the only way to be sure. Of course, that's just my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
I will go a different road here, all chokes produce a 30 inch pattern, it is just a question of the number/percentage of pellets in the 30 inches at a given distance. I think this is what the previous poster was saying by the way.

I'd go with an Improved Cylinder and take a Modified for longer shots, then you only have to worry about one close bird and one far bird as a pair. In this case, if you are a beginner, use the open (IC) choke, if you miss the close bird, take another shot at it. This latter rule of thumb is one way to get at least 50% BTW.

From the first post, I guess this is someone trying sporting clays so they may not be ready to go and pattern lots of chokes with different loads - yes the load makes a difference to the pattern,

Also, I think the issue with the 870 is not chokes but how good are you at shucking the pump ? If you get two birds in the air, either as a true pair, or close following or even some reports, the pump can be a disadvantage. Then again I know pump gunners who do not appear to move their front hand and can shoot as fast a any OU or Semi.

If you did badly with the 1100 it may be that your leads were too short, try doubling you lead when you miss, and see if that helps.

Good luck and enjoy the game, its fun !

Roger
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
Lewis class is not a course it is a classification system. When you join one of the shooting groups like ATA or NSSA you are classified based on your shooting ability and then you compete with those of similar ability. When you pay for the Lewis class you are putting money in for a trophy or prizes for placing within your classification or class. There should be a copy of the rule book and it should state on the shoot program how they are going to pay or distribute tropheys.

With sporting clays you are shooting in hunting like scenarios and are faced with optical illusions. Most courses are set at close range where either a skeet or an Improved cylinder choke will do for most of the course, ask how the course is set.

A big issue with sporting clays is that it can be overwhelming to a new shooter because the birds seem to move so fast and there are obstacles like trees to overcome or birds come from a dark background and then switch to blue sky. Reality is once you learn target focus and hold points, they move as fast as you can point the gun. Gun fit and form become very important, things like taking your head off the stock will cause you many lost targets. If there is an instructor at the course, find out what they charge and ask for one to help you with the course, you would be amazed at what you can learn. Your going to spend the money either way, with many lost targets and not knowing why or with someone that can help point you in the right direction. In some cases to cut cost you can have a small group of 2-3 shooters with one coach, this can be helpful as well because you can see what the other shooters are doing and how it is corrected.

Another thing to consider with the 1100 vs the 870 is the recoil. The 1100 is an auto so will be easier on the shoulder if you shoot a full 100 bird course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
Rick,

That is one of the best descriptions of sporting clays I have read !

"With sporting clays you are shooting in hunting like scenarios and are faced with optical illusions"

The better the target setter the more subtle or hidden the illusion and hence the difficulty.

Roger
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I agree the 1100 would be the preferable gun to use. What I got out of his post was that it has a tightly choke barrel. That is no big deal as new barrels can be had that accept RemChokes for around $150 bucks. It is a simple replacement procedure, if you are not familiar. No different than taking it apart for cleaning.

When I used a Remington 870, I always shot Improved Cylinder with very good success, for sporting clays. 80% of the targets will be pretty close. Most average folks don't even hit 50% at the courses I go to, so don't be discouraged. My first time I shot pitifully, too. Another tip, for the 870... buy yourself a recoil pad. Do a search on www.google.com for "Past Recoil Pad". They make several styles. And will save your shoulder. Believe me, if you are worried about the recoil, when you should be worried about target acquisition, you will have very poor results from flinching. I find that I shoot my best when I don't try to analyze what I am doing. I just follow the clay and pull the trigger. Add into that mix "Oh, this is going to hurt. here it comes... here it comes... it's gonna hurt... pull trigger.... ouch!" and you will do miserably. I guarantee.

Oh yeah...most important advice... have fun :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have no worries of recoil i have a good recoil pad on it it was the gun i started with when i moved from a .410 and have no major problems moving the pump i am just trying my 870 do to the fact my 1100 does not take chokes and is there any more on this lewis class how does it work and how do they group you. were could i find my self a cheap IC choke that will fit my 870 remington does it have to be remington
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Chad,
In your last post you asked for more info on the Lewis class.
Unless there is something I have missed over the years the Lewis class has nothing to do with the classification systems used by the ATA, NSSA or NSCA. These "registered" systems essentially group shooters based on their abilities (ie-skill levels)
and allow for movement upward or downward based on their scores over a period of time or on their earning "punches" by shooting scores which win their class at shoots where there are a certain minimum number of entries. The Lewis class that I am familiar with operates like this. A shoot advertises that it will be paying three Lewis classes with all ties broken by designated stations. This means that there will be money paid to only three shooters from those who paid to play this option.
At the end of the shoot the promoter will arrange the scores of all who played in numerical order. While there are different interpretations from this point on, essentially the scores are then divided into three equal groups with the score at the top of each group being the winner. From this it should be apparent that unless you are the best shooter your chances of winning (second or third-which, by the way, usually pay the same as first) are based strictly on luck. Some who play this option joke that it is their only chance of winning anything. Let's look at some figures. Say there are 30 shooters who play this option and pay $10 to do so. This means that there will be $300 divided equally between three classes or $100 per class.
Lets keep it simple and say that there are 30 different scores recorded. In this example the top score, the score ranked at #11 and the score ranked at #21 are the winners. It gets more complicated when there are scores which tie, odd numbers of entries, etc, so be sure you understand the rules before you pay your money. My advise to new shooters is to learn the game well before you wager on your abilities. If you simply can't resist, try getting together with your buddies and shoot for Cokes or something similar. This can let you know real quick how you react to pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Yes, it has to be a Remington brand choke, or one designed to fit Remington barrels. The term used is RemChoke system. Do a search on the internet for "Remchoke" and you will find many sources for choke tubes. If you have a sporting goods store, they should stock them, as well. You should be able to find them for $10-20 bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I would use a Light mod. 870 shotguns use the RemChoke System. A great one ist the Briley Spectra Series Extended Ported Light Mod Choke. It runs about 70$.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
well i went to walmart and got a IC choke and 100 rounds for my 12 gauge and was all ready for my shoot and what does it go and go it rains like no other so that one got rained out but my next chance is the july 12 so i am hoping i will do well let you know how i do
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top