Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm curious as to what you all consider a "sub gauge" shotgun. I personally think it's anything under (or should I say over) a 20 gauge. I know some people think it's 20 or under or even anything smaller than a 12. What do you guys think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,420 Posts
By most organized tournament definitions, it is anything smaller than 12ga. And no, shooting 7/8's or 3/4 oz of shot through your 12 is not the same as shooting a 20 or 28.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,653 Posts
Despite the usual definition (<12), I think of 28-410 as sub-gauge. In my mind a 16 is basically the same as a 12 and a 20 is a "small" gauge. I used to think of myself as a "sub-senior" too so what do I know?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
This is like the term MID-West, when it was coined in the 1800's the ture west was west of the missisipi river. From todays perspective mid-west could be the plain states west of and boradering the missispi. And might be since MIN & Iowa seem to be midwest included in midwest states today.

IN Correct or not I think 28/410 as subgauge and 20 to 12ga as GAUGE.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
566 Posts
If sub-gauge is <20 why are all sub-gauge events and tube sets defined as 20, 28, or .410? A full set of sub-gauge Briley or Kolar tubes includes 20, 28, and .410. That seems to be pretty definitive to me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
566 Posts
Lots of folks have adopted the 20 gauge as their choice in the 12 gauge event for skeet. This could be some of the logic that some people apply when thinking the 20 gauge is not in the sub-gauge category. It's just a thought. There are also folks who shoot the 28 gauge for all skeet events except for the .410 and doubles. Does this make the sub-gauge <28? I don't think so. I make these points only to shed a common sense perspective on this subject and don't mean to offend anyone by them. It's OK to think whatever a person wants to think when it comes to the sub-gauge subject. Shoot and have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,872 Posts
You can play on words as much as you want but "sub gauge" seems to be defined by clay competition as under 12 as the previous posts states. The 20 is about the smallest practical alternative to general use from a 12 for a variety of game. I hunt ducks, pheasant and grouse. Grouse are about the only bird that a 20 could be substituted for a 12 with little difference. For ducks the 20 is still loaded with adequate steel such that it is practical. The 2 3/4" 20 ga steel load is 3/4oz which makes it about like using a lead 28 load. Even in the days of lead I did not find the 20 a real powerhouse in the duck blinds. Nor has it been all that great on pheasant in the later part of the season. It is a subgauge tht requires more discipline to utilize in the field and is in no way equal to a 12. Really neither is the 16.

DP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Exactly, DP. It doesn't really matter what our opinions are. And there's nothing wrong with having an alternative opinion. But - as defined by this forum and the shooting sports, "sub gauge" means under 12.

Having said that, the effectiveness of each gauge for a particular application, and the choice of gauge among hunters is an entirely different discussion.

W
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,872 Posts
You can use whatever definitions you want and call a 20 a small bore, medium bore etc and the 28 and 410's small bore. My main point was that some of it is realtive in the field. Duck hunters generally consider the 20 a small bore where quail and dove shooters may look at it as a medium bore. Somewhat a matter of perspective.

DP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,506 Posts
12, 20, and 28 are all gauges....the 410 is a bore. So, in my mind only the 410 is a real sub gauge.

If 12 is the Gauge, then20,28, and 410 are sub gauge.

But who made the 12 the Gauge....why not 10 gauge? Now the 12 is also a sub gauge.

It all makes about as much sense as the shot sizing numbers, bigger is smaller!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
< 10 ga

Seriously over the years I have found that for most of my hunting that short of turkey and waterfowl 1oz of shot is enough so basically any gage that is readily available in std (non magnum) S
So I guess that Would generally mean <20 ga.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,824 Posts
Beancounter said:
< 10 ga

Seriously over the years I have found that for most of my hunting that short of turkey and waterfowl 1oz of shot is enough so basically any gage that is readily available in std (non magnum) S
So I guess that Would generally mean <20 ga.
What about the 28 gauge? It fits your defined parameters.

http://web.archive.org/web/20121205105259/http://www.bandpusa.com/extra-rossa-28-ga-max/

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/29...h-brass-ammunition-28-gauge-2-3-4-1-oz-6-shot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I think we have too many gauges to have just 2 categories. Just my personal opinion.

This is the way I break them out:

Big gauge : 10,12

Mid gauge: 16, 20

Sub gauge: 28, 410

Don't own a 10 gauge but have all the others covered. I tend to use my 12's for waterfowl and sporting clays and 5 stand. The 16 and 20 do the bulk of my upland hunting. The 28 is my Quail gun and also use it on chukars once in a while. The .410 I use on clays and sometimes on chukars.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top